Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Stevens or search for Stevens in all documents.

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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
he hill near Mitchell's Ford occupied by the two generals. When the sudden increase of fire broke out, which marked the arrival on the field of Bee and Bartow, Johnston seemed so restless that Beauregard was moved to despatch a staff-officer, Maj. Stevens, with a half-dozen couriers, under orders to ride rapidly, learn the situation, and send back a messenger every ten minutes. Not a word of information had yet come from the left, except what I had seen from the signal station. About 11.30 A. M., Stevens having gone less than a half-hour, there came a further access of fire both of musketry and artillery. It was doubtless due to the attack of Sherman and Keyes upon the flank of Bee and Bartow. No one who heard it could doubt its import. No messages from the left were needed now. All paused for a moment and listened. Then Johnston said, The battle is there! I am going. Walking rapidly to his horse, he mounted and set off at a gallop, followed by his own staff, as fast as they c
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
in. no pursuit. Centreville turned. affair at Ox Hill. Stevens and Kearny. casualties. the ammunition supply. Gen. Ls advance was being made. With this storm on their backs, Stevens's division of Reno's corps, the 9th, charged the approachi his battle, and Kearny's division of the 3d corps came to Stevens's assistance. Stevens was shot through the head. Kearny,Stevens was shot through the head. Kearny, riding into the Confederate lines in the dusk, was also shot dead, as he tried to escape capture by wheeling his horse and dook refuge within the fortified lines about Alexandria. Stevens and Kearny were both prominent and distinguished officerse few fruits of their victory. Indeed, at the moment when Stevens fell, bearing the colors of a regiment which he had taken ties in Washington were about to supersede Pope, and place Stevens in command of the now united armies of Pope and McClellan.k was well acquainted with his military attainments. Both Stevens and Kearny were favorites in the old army, had served most
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
roops engaged in active operations under Gen. Pope, but that his command was limited to the immediate garrison of Washington. At that time Pope himself had already been adjudged incompetent, and the decision would surely have been made to place Stevens in command had he been alive. But the death of Stevens, and the disorderly retreat of Pope's forces within the fortifications, had demoralized the government. McClellan alone was supposed to have the confidence of the army. It was the day oStevens, and the disorderly retreat of Pope's forces within the fortifications, had demoralized the government. McClellan alone was supposed to have the confidence of the army. It was the day of his triumph, and one of humiliation to both Lincoln and Halleck. Yet McClellan was out of place. He would have been an excellent chief of staff, but was unfit for the command of an army. He was as utterly without audacity, as Lee was full of it. His one fine quality was his ability to organize and discipline. He constructed a superb machine, which, being once constructed, would fight a battle with skill and courage if only let alone. McClellan, during the Seven Days, let it alone, abse