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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 58 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 2 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for C. H. Stevens or search for C. H. Stevens in all documents.

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and await further orders from me. The officer in command of the regiment at that time, Lieutenant-Colonel Stevens, (Colonel McConnel being unwell, but on the ground,) immediately executed that order, is regiment deployed in line of battle, and in another position. I immediately inquired of Colonel Stevens the reason of their position being altered. He told me that Colonel Miles had directed this movement. I asked him why? Col. Stevens replied, I do not know, but he had no confidence in Col. Miles. I inquired the reason why? Col. Stevens answered, Because Col. Miles is drunk. That closeCol. Stevens answered, Because Col. Miles is drunk. That closed the conversation. I sent Col. Stevens back with his regiment, to form close column by division, as at first. I then reported to Capt. Alexander that I had been interfered with in my disposition ofCol. Stevens back with his regiment, to form close column by division, as at first. I then reported to Capt. Alexander that I had been interfered with in my disposition of the troops during the day, and I could not carry out Gen. McDowell's orders as long as I was interfered with by a drunken man. Capt. Alexander then answered that Gen.McDowell now vested the whole dis
ath of Gen. Bee. He has been regarded as one among the best military appointments, and has won opinion in every act of his military life. He was first in the field to sustain our leading column at every succeeding crisis of the contest. He was present at the passage of the turnpike; at the gallant charge of the Hampton Legion; at the storming of the batteries; and at last fell near the fatal spot where also had fallen the gallant Bartow. Of his aids were Gen. Gist, Col. Shingler, and Major Stevens, who was slightly wounded, shared his pains, and remained to the further fortune of the contest. Nor is less sympathy experienced for the sufferings of Gen. Smith. He came to stem the current of our backward fortunes, and leading his brigade to the very head of the flanking column, fell almost at the first fire, pierced through the breast with a grape shot. Hopes, however, are entertained for his recovery. On his staff were our townsmen, Col. Buist and Capt. Tupper, who were with h
Doc. 43.-Second regiment Wis. Volunteers. The following are the officers of the regiment: Field and Staff.--Colonel, S. Park Coon; Lieutenant-Colonel, H. W. Peck; Major, Duncan McDonald; Quartermaster, H. E. Pame; Adjutant, E. M. Hunter; Aid to Colonel, rank of Captain, Henry Landes; Surgeon, Dr. Lewis; Mate, Dr. Russell. Captains of Companies.--Captain Colwell, La Crosse Light Guard; Captain Mansfield, Portage Light Guard; Captain Bouck, Oshkosh Volunteers; Captain Stevens, Citizens' Guard; Captain Strong, Belle City Rifles; Captain Allen, Miners' Guard; Captain McKee, Grant County Rifles; Captain Randolph, Randall Guard; Captain Ely, Janesville Volunteers; and Captain Langworthy, Wisconsin Rifles.--National Intelligencer, June 26.
he loan bill, in the House of Representatives, July 10, 1861. Mr. Stevens moved that the House resolve itself into Committee of the Whole be concluded in one hour. Mr. Burnett desired to know whether Mr. Stevens intended to afford reasonable opportunity for discussion. Mr.Mr. Stevens replied that he proposed to allow one hour for debate, because he knew some gentlemen on the other side wanted to make speeches. He (Stevens) would be equally accommodating on some other bill. Mr. Stevens' motion was agreed to. Mr. Colfax (Rep., Ind.) was called to Mr. Stevens' motion was agreed to. Mr. Colfax (Rep., Ind.) was called to preside over the Committee. Mr. Stevens, (Rep., Pa.,) from the Committee on Ways and Means, reported a bill for the support of the army foMr. Stevens, (Rep., Pa.,) from the Committee on Ways and Means, reported a bill for the support of the army for the fiscal year ending with June next, and for arrearages for the year ending 30th of June last; also a bill making appropriations for the iana, at whose instance the Holman gag was yesterday adopted. Mr. Stevens made no remarks, though the rules allowed him an hour to do so,
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 125.-Southern Bank Convention. (search)
W. A. Caldwell; Bank of Yanceyville, Thomas D. Johnston; Bank of Clarendon, John D. Williams; Commercial Bank of Wilmington, O. G. Parsley; Bank of Washington, James E. Hoyt; Miners' and Planters' Bank, A. T. Davidson. South Carolina.--Bank of the State of South Carolina, C. M. Furman; Bank of South Carolina, C. V. Chamberlain; State Bank, Wm. C. Bee, Geo. B. Reid, Robert Mure, and Geo. M. Coffin; Union Bank of South Carolina, W. B. Smith; Planters and Mechanics' Bank, J. J. McCarter, C. H. Stevens, and C. T. Mitchell; Bank of Charleston, J. K. Sass and George A. Trenholm; Southwestern Railroad Bank, Jas. Rose, J. G. Holmes; Farmers' and Exchange Bank, John S. Davies; People's Bank, D. L. McKay and James S. Gibbes; Merchants' Bank of South Carolina, at Cheraw, Allen Macfarlan; Bank of Georgetown, J. G. Henning; Bank of Chester, George S. Cameron. Tennessee.--Bank of Tennessee, G. C. Torbett; Branch Bank of Tennessee, Memphis, Jos. Lenow; Branch Bank of Tennessee, Knoxville, J. G
earnestly to him to permit me to command my division, and protested against the faulty disposition of the troops to resist an attack. He replied by taking command himself and relieving me. Col. Richardson states a conversation with Lieutenant-Colonel Stevens, of his command. I never saw Colonel Stevens to my knowledge. I never gave him, or any one, the order to deploy his column: the order must have emanated from some one else, and hence my misfortune; for on his impression that I was druColonel Stevens to my knowledge. I never gave him, or any one, the order to deploy his column: the order must have emanated from some one else, and hence my misfortune; for on his impression that I was drunk, those not immediately connected with me rung it over the field, without inquiry or investigation. This is all that is proper for me to say at this time, as I have called for a court to investigate the whole transaction. Those who have read Richardson's report will confer a favor to compare this statement with it; the discrepancies are glaring, the errors by deductions apparent. L. S. miles, Colonel Second Infantry.
been ordered to march into Virginia in the morning, and had positively refused to obey. Colonel Stevens had been with them during the day, endeavoring to restore peace, but his exertions were of ne extending to the base, and at an angle with the horsemen. The command was then given by Colonel Stevens to the Seventy-ninth to fall in, and was obeyed with some reluctance. The line was formed f the meadow. The lines having been formed, General Porter and his staff, accompanied by Colonel Stevens, rode up to the centre. After a moment or two of delay, an aid of General Porter read the y be distinguished. Immediately behind his aid was General Porter, firm and self-possessed. Col. Stevens was in front of his own regiment, endeavoring to quiet his rather nervous horse. In the rearstol range, by any of the officers. After the orders had been read, General Porter said to Colonel Stevens, Point out the leaders. A squad of men were detailed from the battalion to accompany the c