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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for T. H. Stevens or search for T. H. Stevens in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 34: (search)
Paulding. Wachusett, for the purpose of joining his command, which he had passed on the way up; when General Franklin telegraphed him that he was attacked by a superior force and desired the assistance of the gun-boats--that he wanted immediate support, etc. At this moment the gun-boat Maratanza was engaged. two miles below. in endeavoring to haul the gun-boat Marblehead off a shoal. Receiving Captain William Smith's orders to go on board the Maratanza and bring her into action. Stevens took a boat from the Wachusett and joined his vessel. The Wachusett and Sebago went into action with some batteries that had been posted on hills to prevent the advance of the Union Army. The gun-boats shelled the Confederate artillery for nearly an hour with their heavy rifled guns, when the enemy retired. It was the opinion of General Franklin's officers that the rapid and accurate fire of the gun-boats was greatly instrumental in saving the Army from severe disaster, if not defeat.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
ove up to the northwest front of the fort, with his division, for the purpose of making a diversion, while the remainder of the divisions were ordered to close up and wait for the order to advance upon the southeast point. The intention of Commander Stevens was to wait until he had the full benefit of Lieutenant Higginson's diversion; but mistaking his movement, no doubt, as a general one, and with a true spirit of emulation and gallantry, many of the other boats dashed on to the fort. Findinhe pulled toward it, but found that all its crew had been removed or were drowned. Upon returning to the fort, he examined the sea-face and gorge wall; he observed all the boats retreating, and, on inquiring from one of them, was told that Commander Stevens had given the order to retreat. Ensign Wallace could obtain no information upon which to act, and seeing no boats between him and the fort, he pulled back to the flag-ship, where he first learned that Lieutenant Remey, with his boat's crew
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
s, but displayed in the action the steadiness of veterans, fighting their guns almost as coolly as if they were at an ordinary exercise. Lieutenant Thomas L. Swann, the ordnance officer, had everything ready, and the working of his department was admirable; he was principally occupied during the action with the bowchasers. The other division officers--Captain Houston, of the marines, Lieutenant Charles F. Blake. Ensigns Cassell and Sigsbee, with their assistants, Master's-Mates Duncan and Stevens, fought their guns nobly and well. The powder division, under Acting-Ensign Utter, could not have been conducted better. Chief-Engineer Kellogg's department worked beautifully. Doctor Maulsby was fully prepared for the wounded, and extended to those unfortunates all the solicitude and care that a generous nature could dictate. Ensign Pendleton, my aide and signal officer, afforded me great assistance, being always prompt and active in his duties. To our pilot, Mr. Christopher