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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 37 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 18 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 2 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 3 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for T. H. Stevens or search for T. H. Stevens in all documents.

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Commander T. A. M. Craven; the Manhattan, Commander I. W. A. Nicholson; the Winnebago, Commander T. H. Stevens; and the Chickasaw, Lieutenant Commander G. H. Perkins--were already inside the bar, anake command of the Chickasaw, and did his duty nobly. The Winnebago was commanded by Commander T. H. Stevens, who volunteered for that position. His vessel steers very badly, and neither of his t Charles F. Blake, Ensigns Cassel and Sigsbee, with their assistants, Master's Mates Duncan and Stevens — fought their guns nobly and well. The powder division, under Acting Ensign Utter, could noar-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron, Mobile Bay, Ala. Report of Commander T. H. Stevens. U. S. Monitor Winnebago, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. To Rear-Admiral D. G. FarragutI am indebted for valuable assistance. I have the honor to remain, your obedient servant, T. H. Stevens, Commander. U. S. S. Winnebago, Mobile Bay, Aug. 5, 1864. sir: I have the honor to infor
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 87.-the campaign in Florida. (search)
y, independent battalion of Massachusetts cavalry under Major Stevens, and Elders's horse battery of First artillery, pushed ition. I omitted to mention in the proper place that Major Stevens, of the First Massachusetts cavalry, was with company C the condition of the camp, that officer, together with Major Stevens, of the Independent Battalion, went forward and examine of Captain Elder's flying artillery. Colonel Henry and Major Stevens placed themselves at the head of the battalion, and at back. His office was in a house just beyond the camp. Major Stevens walked into the room and seized the fellow by the throa The Independent Massachusetts cavalry battalion, with Major Stevens at its head, and for its company officers such men as Cant in company C, accepted the opportunity to accompany Major Stevens as volunteer aid. He recently received his commission a command, the battalion of Massachusetts cavalry, under Major Stevens, the Fortieth Massachusetts mounted volunteers, and to
e, the skirmishing commenced at the time our advance-guard crossed the railroad. The Fortieth Massachusetts cavalry, Colonel Henry, the Independent battalion, Major Stevens, and the Seventh Connecticut infantry participated in this preliminary action. Our skirmishers were halted till Captains Hamilton and Elder, with their battermediate neighborhood, also, were the Fortieth regiment Massachusetts mounted infantry, Colonel Henry; the Independent battalion of Massachusetts cavalry, under Major Stevens; and the artillery, consisting of Captain Hamilton's, Captain Langdon's, and Captain Elder's batteries, as well as a section of the Third Rhode Island artillere, consisting of the Forty-seventh, Forty-eighth, and One Hundred and Fifteenth New-York regiments. The column in the centre was made up of the cavalry, under Major Stevens; the mounted infantry, under Colonel Guy V. Henry; the Seventh Connecticut, Colonel Hawley; and the Seventh New-Hampshire, Colonel Abbott. The left was comman
unted for on the ground that General Banks was menacing Alexandria, and they decided to sacrifice one of the two places to hold the other. The troops have already reembarked, and are on the way to Alexandria. Fort De Russy takes its name from Colonel De Russy, who formerly commanded in this vicinity, and lives not far distant. Lieutenant-Colonel Bird was in command, though he reported to General Walker, whose headquarters were at Alexandria. The following officers are prisoners: Captains Stevens, Morran, Wise, Wright, Laird, and King; Lieutenants Denson, Fuller, Fogarty, Claydon, Trumbull, (Eng.,) Burbank, Hewey, Assenheimer, Fall, Hauk, Ball, Little, Barksdale, Spinks, Bringhurst, and Stout. From various sources we gather that the rebels here have about abandoned the idea of defending any of their navigable streams. When asked to account for their apparent neglect of so important a fort, they reply that this was considered merely as an experiment in engineering, (certainly
ed on the Brook turnpike, a few miles from the city. This was about ten o'clock A. M. They were gallantly met by a detachment of battery-troops, commanded by Colonel Stevens. After an engagement of some thirty minutes with light fieldpieces, they were driven off and retired in the direction of the Meadow Bridges, on the Central ramage. It was reported last night, that this column had encamped about five miles from the city, on the Mechanicsville road. In the fight on the Brook road, Colonel Stevens had one man killed and seven wounded. This force of the enemy is variously estimated at from one thousand to five thousand cavalry, and a battery of artilleryompletely successful defence of the city of Richmond, and its rescue from the ravages of the invader. The enemy was gallantly repulsed on the north side by Colonel Stevens's command, and on the west by Brigadier-General G. W. C. Lee's troops. Their conduct is entitled to the highest praise and credit. To Colonel Bradley T. J