Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. H. Stevens or search for W. H. Stevens in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Officers of Gen. R. E. Lee's staff. (search)
November, 1862, to November 4, 1864, Lieutenant Colonel A. A. & I. General to April 9, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel E. Murray, A. A. & I. General, September, 1863, to November 4, 1864. Major Giles B. Cooke, A. A. & I. General, November 4, 1864, to April 9, 1865. Captain Henry E. Young, Judge Advocate General, September, 1863, to November 4, 1864, and Major A. A. & I. General to April 9, 1865. Lieutenant Colonel Wm. P. Smith, Chief of Engineers, September, 1863, toβ€”β€”, 1864. Colonel W. H. Stevens, Chief of Engineers,β€”β€”, 1864, and Brigadier General in April, 1865. Captain Samuel R. Johnston, Engineer Officer, November, 1862, and Lieutenant Colonel in April, 1865. Others in the Medical Department: Surgeon Joseph E. Claggett, in charge of Hospital. Surgeon E. J. Breckinridge, Medical Inspector. Surgeon T. H. Wingfield. Surgeon James C. Herndon. Surgeon Samuel M. Bemiss. Surgeon E. D. Newton. Others who served on General Lee's Staff: Allen, John M., Captain a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
of Anderson's, Gibson's, Pond's, Chalmers' and J. K. Jackson's Brigades. The artillery of both corps followed their respective lines by the Pittsburg road. The 1st Corps, of not more than 8,500 bayonets, under Major-General Polk, was drawn up in a column of brigades deployed in line about 800 yards to the rear of Bragg. It was subdivided into divisions of two brigades each, Clark's Division, formed of Russell's and A. P. Stewart's Brigades; Cheetham's Division, of B. R. Johnson's and Stevens' Brigades, and, with the special reserve of three brigades under Brigadier-General Breckinridge, about 6,000 bayonets, constituted a reserve for the support of the attacking lines as might be needed on either flank. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, was distributed for the most part to guard the flanks. With the exception of Forrest's and Wharton's (8th Texas) Regiments, lately regimented, insufficiently armed and wholly without drill, the nature of the scene of operations rendered the c