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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 50 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 42 12 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 38 6 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 29 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 21 5 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 17 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 16 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 13 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Carter L. Stevenson or search for Carter L. Stevenson in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
eral Rosecrans, had crossed the mountains to Stevenson and Bridgeport. His force of effective infnter's ferry, the most accessible point from Stevenson. By a direct route he was now as near our meral A. W. Reynolds, and also to Major-General Carter L. Stevenson, asking their influence to that rom none of these except the one sent to General Stevenson. That officer approved of the applicati Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's hourse, could be done without orders from General Stevenson, whose division was yet on the Ridge, fi commander on that part of the field, Major-General Stevenson, had six brigades at his disposal. Ule and other points through Generals Lee and Stevenson, for materials to secure the immense raft co resolved upon a personal interview with General Stevenson, so ordering my horse, a rapid ride brou[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ements preceding and following that important event, the following narrative is submitted: On the 20th of August, it was ascertained certainly that the Federal army from Middle Tennessee, under General Rosecrans, had crossed the mountains to Stevenson and Bridgeport. His force of effective infantry and artillery amounted to fully 70,000, divided into four corps. About the same time, General Burnside advanced from Kentucky towards Knoxville, East Tennessee, with a force estimated by the Gewithdrawn, and the enemy commenced a movement in force against our left and rear. On the last of August, it became known that he had crossed his main force over the Tennessee river, at and near Carpenter's ferry, the most accessible point from Stevenson. By a direct route he was now as near our main depot of supplies as we were, and our whole line of communication was exposed, whilst his was partially secured by mountains and the river. By the timely arrival of two small divisions from Missi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
on the 2d August, 1863, he wrote to Brigadier-General A. W. Reynolds, and also to Major-General Carter L. Stevenson, asking their influence to that end. He made an application likewise to General Joending it through the regular channel. He heard from none of these except the one sent to General Stevenson. That officer approved of the application, and sent it to General Hardee's headquarters ing been left at Morton, Miss., and sent to General Bragg. The application was returned to General Stevenson, through General Longstreet's headquarters. General Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant StillGeneral Stevenson sent it by Lieutenant Stillwell of Corput's battery, to General Johnston's headquarters at Meridian, Miss. The General's Adjutant referred him to General Hardee, who told him he had nothing to do with the section; but at the e the field we should be captured. Nothing, of course, could be done without orders from General Stevenson, whose division was yet on the Ridge, fighting the enemy. About 7 P. M. he moved off the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
ourth one came, striking the bank about the same place; but the last one came so very near his head that he concluded to beat a retreat, being convinced that a picket in a tree top, not far distant, was taking deliberate aim at him. When, on the 4th of June, the New Hope line was abandoned for the Lost Mountain line, and that afterwards for the Noonday Valley line, the Third Maryland took part in every movement. On the 22d, at Marietta, the battery was ordered out on the field with General Stevenson's division, to charge the right wing of the enemy's line. It was placed on a hill half a mile from the Federal force, there to await further orders; but it was not sent forward. Stevenson's division was repulsed, with the loss of a thousand men killed and wounded. The Maryland battery lost none, though under a severe artillery fire the whole time. On the night of the 4th of July the battalion was ordered to the Chattahoochee river; thence on the 9th to within eight miles of Atla
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge. (search)
new development in that direction, I returned towards the left, to find a heavy cannonading going on from the enemy's batteries on our forces occupying the slope of Lookout Mountain, between the crest and the river. A very heavy force soon advanced to the assault and was met by one brigade only, Walthall's, which made a desperate resistance, but was finally compelled to yield ground; why this command was not sustained is yet unexplained. The commander on that part of the field, Major-General Stevenson, had six brigades at his disposal. Upon his urgent appeal, another brigade was dispatched in the afternoon to his support—though it appeared his own forces had not been brought into action, and I proceeded to the scene. Arriving just before sunset, I found that we had lost all the advantages of the position. Orders were immediately given for the ground to be disputed until we could withdraw our forces across Chattanooga Creek and the movement was commenced. This having been suc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
s. The first time I ever saw Vicksburg was in April before the siege. As the engineer officer in charge of the fortification at Snyder's and Hayne's bluffs, I had been making requisitions on Mobile and other points through Generals Lee and Stevenson, for materials to secure the immense raft constructed across the Yazoo river, opposite the seige guns of Snyder's Bluff. The raft was about to give way from the pressures of at least 6,000 tons of drift wood accumulated on its upper side. In my anxiety to secure the raft I resolved upon a personal interview with General Stevenson, so ordering my horse, a rapid ride brought me to headquarters in the now famous city. The air was full of rumors of the great strength and scientific dispositions of the defenses of Vicksburg, and with faith I accepted the statement that no force could take the city. About the middle watch of the night the belching of a cannon in one of the water batteries awoke the city from its easy slumbers. Offic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the Third Maryland Artillery. (search)
w weeks since, have been destroyed. The officer in charge of the battery will be held accountable for the loss. Every effort is being made to get shoes for the command, and the artillery shall have its proportion as soon as received. Clothing can be obtained on proper requisition in a short time. Let the quarter-master make requisition for salt for horses. General Order No. 17 prescribes the quantity of transportation to batteries and no more can be obtained. By command of Major-General Stevenson, G. A. Haywood, A. C. C. head-quarter's Rowan's battery, near Dalton, Ga., April 10th, 1864. Major,—I respectfully submit for your consideration a few facts in regard to the feed furnished the stock of this battalion. I have been in the Tennessee army since last November and can truly say during the whole of that time the stock of my command has not been half fed. In some instances the horses going for two days at a time without anything to eat. Rotten corn, half rations at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 72 (search)
n Lebanon pike. It will be remembered that General Joseph E. Johnston had been placed in command of this Confederate department, but did not engage in active field operations, and that also, not anticipating any attack from the enemy, had sent Generals Morgan and Forrest with their cavalry in different directions—the first to destroy Rosecrans's communications in Kentucky, the latter to harrass, cut off, and destroy Grant's line of communications; and also a division of infantry under General Stevenson had been sent to our army in Mississippi. Battle of Murfreesboroa. On the night of the 30th, the writer having a short time before resigned his commission in the line and accepted that of Assistant Adjutant General on General Walthall's (just promoted) staff, who at this juncture was on sick leave in Virginia, and his brigade temporarily commanded by General Patton Anderson, recently deceased, we received instructions that by early dawn the next morning the left under Hardee (h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 78 (search)
e force, exclusive of cavalry, was 35,000. (Official report of the battle of Chickamauga, by General Bragg, page 1.) having a passage of the river at various points The main force crossed at Carpenter's Ferry, the most accessible point from Stevenson. (Ib. page 3.) and seizing important gaps, and threatening Chattanooga by the pass over the point of Lookout Mountain, Bragg was again forced to retreat, The enemy, by a direct route, was as near our main depot of supplies as we ourselves weretreat out of Tennessee by fording the river at Decatur, Ala., and thus almost completely cutting off the supplies of Rosecrans's army. We occupied the entire south side of the river, from Lookout to Bridgeport; and as the latter place, with Stevenson, was supplied from depots at Nashville and Louisville by a single railroad, and the river road on the north side rendered unsafe by the unerring fire of our sharp-shooters, it necessitated the hauling of supplies by the enemy a distance of sixt