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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charles Stevenson or search for Charles Stevenson in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
ng Third Assistant-Engineer McEwan, amputation arm; Acting Master's Mate R. P. Herrick, slightly; Acting Ensign W. H. Heginbotham, severely, (since dead;) Wilder Venner, landsman, leg; Adolphus Pulle, seaman, severe flesh wounds, legs; Hiram Elder, seaman, right leg; R. Dumphery, coal-heaver, both arms; Wm. Thompson, ordinary seaman, one leg; E. Johnson, boy, contusion, side; Walter Lloyd, boy, leg; M. Forbes, captain mizzen-top, contusion, side; Wm. Stanley, seaman, contusion and on leg; C. Stevenson, boy, contusion; F. Campbell, seaman, contusion; Wm. Doyle, boy, contusion, side; Auguste Simmons, landsman; Peter Pitts, boy; Michael Fayal, landsman; David Ortin; Wm. Trask, left leg; Charles Dennis, both arms; Thomas O'Connell, right hand off. Total, twenty-three. Congratulatory letter to rear-admiral Farragut. Navy Department, Washington, August 15, 1864. sir: Your despatch of the fifth instant, stating that you had, on the morning of that day, entered Mobile Bay, passing b
amin Harper, seaman; James B. Osgood, ordinary seaman; Adolphus Pulle, seaman; Thomas Bayne, ordinary seaman; John C. Scott, ordinary seaman; Thomas Stanton, seaman; James Alexander, landsman; Henry Clark, first-class boy; Wm. E. Andrews, Captain After-Guard; Frederick Munsell, landsman; George Walker, landsman; Thomas Wildes, landsman; George Stillwell, nurse; David Morrow, Quarter-Gunner; Peter Duncan, coal-heaver; Andrew E. Smith, coal-heaver; Francis Campbell, second-class fireman; Charles Stevenson, second-class boy; David Curtin, landsman. Severely Wounded — Wilder Verner, landsman; M. C. Forbes, Captain Top; Michael Fanya, landsman; James S. Geddis, landsman <*> Wm. G. Trask, ordinary seaman; Wm. A. Stanley, seaman; Thomas O'Connell, coal-heaver; James R. Garrison, coal-heaver; E. E. Johnson, first-class boy; George E. Fleke, first-class boy; Charles Dennis, (colored,) landsman; Auguste Simmons, ordinary seaman; William Thompson, first ordinary seaman; Peter Pitts, (colored,
When General Rosecrans took command of the army in Kentucky, it was massed at Bowling Green and Glasgow. The base of supplies was then at Louisville. A few days later it was advanced to Nashville, which was made a secondary base. After the battle of Perryville, and our pursuit to Mount Vernon, as stated in my last report, the rebel army retreated across the Cumberland Mountains, leaving a force in Cumberland Gap; then moved down the Tennessee Valley to Chattanooga, and thence by Stevenson and Tullahoma to Murfreesboro, a distance of four hundred miles, while our army had marched to Nashville, a distance of only a little over two hundred miles. On the twenty-sixth of December, General Rosecrans advanced against Bragg, whose forces were at that time somewhat dispersed along the road. On the thirtieth, our army, after heavy skirmishing en route, reached the vicinity of Murfreesboro, and took up a line of battle The left, under Crittenden, crossed next day to the east side
divisions by way of New-Market, Larkinsville, and Bellefonte, while I conducted the other two divisions by Decherd, the Fourth division crossing the mountains to Stevenson, and the Third by University Place and Sweiden's Cave. In person I proceeded by Sweiden's Lane and Battle Creek, reaching Bridgeport at night of November thirt before by the withdrawal of Walker's division, which was sent to the right, leaving only Stevenson's and Cheatham's divisions behind, both under command of General Stevenson. General Cheatham arrived on the ground late in the afternoon, having just returned to the army. Up to the time of his return, his division was under the cohe confederates were steadily pushed back from the moment the infantry opened fire until late in the evening, when General Breckinridge went to the assistance of Stevenson with a brigade. The Federals, who had driven the confederates slowly around the north face of the mountain to Craven's house, and thence around almost to the ro