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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 62 0 Browse Search
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soon as our men, composed of Stevenson's and Stewart's divisions, advanced, a brisk fire ensued beg on the right of Hindman's, Stevenson's, and Stewart's divisions. There were four lines of battle fighting on Brown's line, of Stevenson's and Stewart's divisions, was long and desperate. Captain in a few seconds Hindman's, Stevenson's, and Stewart's men were pouring in a well-directed fire. nd Sixty-third Virginia. Neither Hindman nor Stewart had need of their reserves, as the charges ofhe greatest fury and determination possible. Stewart had already repulsed him three times, and Stethe first volley, than one of the brigades of Stewart's division broke, compelling the others to faod cut him off from the Dalton road. While Stewart was making his movement a peremptory order reemphatically that of Generals Stevenson's and Stewart's divisions, for although Hindman was engagedarmy closely, and pressed us all the day, but Stewart's division has kept him at bay so far. This e[12 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
before aid could be sent to the Rapidan. Perhaps a division, or a portion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Suffolk, on the fourth of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson. Hooker's and Lee's forces. Up to the meeting of Congress, Hooker had made no report to General Halleck, and official data is out of the question. But information is at hand from which an approximation can be made. Lee's Army. New York Tribune, May 18, 1863, estimates 50,000 New York Tribune, March 26, 1861, estimates 49,700 New York Herald, March 26, 1864, estimates 64,000 Southorn history (Pollard's) gives 50,000 Hooker's Army. New York Times
Rappahannock. During the presence of Longstreet's wing at Suffolk, Lee, with Jackson's wing, was confronted by the army of Hooker. Hooker was advised of every change in my front, and assured that I would hold Longstreet as long as possible in order that he might destroy Lee. He was urged to strike before aid could be sent to the Rapidan. Perhaps a division, or a portion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Suffolk, on the fourth of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson.
unboat Tacony, were despatched to Little Washington. At an early hour on Tuesday morning, the nineteenth instant, despatches were received from General Wessels and Commander Flusser, announcing an attack by a rebel land force, on the afternoon of the seventeenth instant. This was the first information received from General Wessels subsequent to the sixteenth instant, when the Tacony was sent back as above stated. The latest information received, through a contraband, the servant of Captain Stewart, A. . General, General Wessels' staff, is to the effect that early on Tuesday morning the ironclad had complete control of the Roanoke River, and in conjunction with the floating iron battery--the Cotton plant --was attacking the town in rear, while the land forces were engaging our troops in front. From this statement it will be seen that the enemy had complete control of the Roanoke River, within a very few hours of the time I received General Wessels' despatch of Sunday night, the
cook two miles east of town; are now playing smash with the railroad. Our cavalry have hard and continuous fighting, but are driving the enemy all the time. July 28--Clear. Resting. July 30--Wet. July 31--Clear. Daylight start; marched to Darksville. Roberts, Smith, and Wear to hospital; about the hottest day I ever experienced; in charge of picket of twenty men at White Sulphur Springs. All quiet. August 1--Clear. Got a good breakfast; bought Starr's repeating pistol from Stewart on General Gordon's staff; price--, No. 9,010; pleasant and shady out here; would like to stay on duty. Buttermilk and pork for dinner. 5 P. M., relieved by Clark's battery men; slight rain this evening. August 2--Dull. Slight rain; how I do wish it would come down for a twenty-four hours stretch. Yanks said to be cautiously advancing; all of them across the Potomac. August 3--Clear. General inspection; preaching yesterday; slight shower; orders to cook two day's rations and move
at Hardee's and Lee's corps commenced arriving at Jonesboroa early this morning, leaving in Atlanta Stewart's corps, and the militia. The merest tyro, by looking at the map, can see the dangers of tprevalent in our army, to be true. During the afternoon, specific orders for the withdrawal of Stewart's corps and the militia were issued, and about sunset the latter were withdrawn from the trenches. When they were fairly on the road, Stewart's corps followed, all being en route by midnight, except the cavalry, a brigade or two of infantry, and the pickets. These latter remained until the aap. It came across on the double-quick, and checked the enemy. While Hardee attacked in flank, Stewart's corps was to attack in front directly out from the main works, but fortunately their attacks ns, which accounted for the sounds so plainly heard by us, and which were yet unexplained; that Stewart's corps was then retreating toward McDonough, and that the militia had gone off toward Covingto