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ard to Summersville, eight miles distant. As our scouters ascended from a little valley to the crest of a mound, which looks down into the village, a party of mounted rebels were discovered flying down the road. A few wild shots were sent after them, without effect, excepting to increase their speed. We were now informed that McCoslin's Thirty-sixth Virginia regiment had retreated toward the rebel camp on Gauley River scarcely six hours before. Shortly after our column halted, a party of Stewart's Hoosier Cavalry captured a brace of rebel dragoons, after an exciting chase down the Charleston road. We now advanced with extreme caution. We had no definite information concerning the rebel position, and were liable to fall into an ambuscade or masked battery. Benham's skirmishers flanked the road on either side, sweeping every foot of ground, and scouts were sent forward to scour the jungle. Five or six miles below Summersville, Schaumberg's Chicago Dragoons and a small detachmen
Ferry, I directed General Gorman to throw across the river at that point two companies of the First Minnesota under cover of a fire from Rickett's battery, and sent out a party of thirty-one Van Alen Cavalry under Maj. Mix, accompanied by Captain Chas. Stewart, assistant adjutant-general, Captain Murphy, and Lieutenants Pierce and Gouraud, with orders to advance along the Leesburg road until they should come to the vicinity of a battery which was known to be on that road, and then turn to the l see the enemy, and his cowardly discharges were thinning our ranks; still most of the men stood firm and acted bravely. The enemy's volleys and yells increased in loudness, and it was evident that reinforcements were pouring in to his aid. Captain Stewart, General Stone's adjutant, came on the field with the cheering statement that General Gorman would shortly support us. At a quarter to six P. M. we held a council of war, and resolved to stand our ground, General Baker ordering me to go for
ch, and when endeavoring to pass where we were posted our men were ordered to fire, which they did, causing the enemy to retreat. Previous to their retreating, which was caused by a well-directed fire from the left wing, under command of Captain John Falconer, the enemy fired on us, killing one, private John Downie, of the eighth company. At the same time the right wing captured a prisoner, who was wounded, and who had on when captured a Major's shoulder straps. His name is Hobbs, of Colonel Stewart's Cavalry regiment. Having successfully accomplished the mission we were ordered on — the prevention of the pickets at Lewinsville being reinforced — and the enemy having retreated, and the alarm being sounded in all the enemy's camps in the neigh-borhood, we left our position, and arrived in camp by way of Langley at half-past 10 o'clock A. M. The lowest estimate of the enemy's loss is four killed, two wounded, and one prisoner. Much of the success of the expedition is owing to the
the honor and reputation of other regiments may be involved, as from such statements not only great injustice may be done, but ill-will, most prejudicial to the good of the service, is certain to be engendered. By order of Brig.-Gen. Stone. Chas. Stewart, Asst. Adj.-General. Lieutenant Bramhall's report. at Thomas Oxley's House, near Conrad's Ferry, Md., Oct. 24, 1861. Captain T. B. Bunting, commanding Light Battery K, detached Ninth Regiment New York State Militia: sir: I beg to ng plainly the cause of its disappearance. At this time there was but one cannoneer (Carmichael) by the piece. The piece was brought into position by the aid of General Baker, Colonel Coggswell, Colonel Lee (I think that is his name) and Captain Stewart, of General Stone's staff. Assisted by these gentlemen, the firing was resumed, and maintained until they were obliged to leave and go to their several commands. I then called for volunteers, whom I soon obtained from the infantry. I woul
P. M., and had not proceeded over half a mile on the Greenville road, when the enemy was discovered in front of us by Capt. Stewart, whose vigilance and untiring energy during the whole march were conspicuous. Col. Ross, whose regiment was the lee enemy were pursued by our troops for several miles, until the approach of night induced me to recall them to town. Capt. Stewart, however, with his squadron of cavalry followed them until late in the night, and brought in several prisoners. One n found. I herewith append the reports of Cols. Ross, Marsh, Hovey, Baker, Lieut.-Col. Pennabaker, Maj. Schofield, Capt. Stewart, and Lieut. White, to which I would respectfully refer you for the operations of their respective commands. Before, to march toward Greenville, and took my place in line in rear of the Seventeenth Illinois--being third in position, Capt. Stewart's squadron of cavalry leading the march. The march had continued scarcely a mile when the column was halted and info
c. 101. reconnoissance from Edwards' Ferry, Va. Major Mix's report. Headquarters Van Alen Cavalry, camp Bates, near Poolesville, Md., Nov. 4, 1861. Capt. Chas. Stewart, Assistant Adjutant-General, Headquarters Corps of Observation: sir: I have the honor to submit the following report of my reconnoissance on the 21st ultf Brigadier-General Stone, I crossed the Potomac at Edwards' Ferry, about seven o'clock A. M., with a party of three officers and thirty-one rank and file, Capt. Charles Stewart, Assistant Adjutant-General, accompanying the party. A line of skirmishers, consisting of two companies of the First Minnesota, commanded the line of the as shot, another stumbled and fell, leaving two men almost in the ranks of the enemy. These men were rescued and brought back in a most gallant manner by Captain Charles Stewart and Lieutenant George E. Gour, and were quickly mounted, when we formed for a charge, but the enemy had deployed to the right and left of the road and aga
suing from them, surrounded as they were, the famous pivot gun Lady Davis was turned loose upon them from this side, and Stewart's and smith's batteries opened fire from a position on this side of the river, opposite them. The Lady Davis fired two pon the gunboats, whenever they showed themselves around the bend above. It was plain that several of our balls from Major Stewart's battery struck the boat, but the amount of damage was not known at the time. These gentlemen now bring the report,our line--one piece near my tent. Hamilton's artillery replied to the boats, and they soon moved out of range, when Captain Stewart, with his Parrott guns, went two miles up the bluff and opened on the boats. Most of his guns threw over the boats, and the enemy's balls did not reach us. Adjutant Hammond and I were with Captain Stewart, and helped the men to place the guns in position a number of times. They were just going to fire one of the guns, when Hammond and I retired some ten or twel
suing from them, surrounded as they were, the famous pivot gun Lady Davis was turned loose upon them from this side, and Stewart's and smith's batteries opened fire from a position on this side of the river, opposite them. The Lady Davis fired two pon the gunboats, whenever they showed themselves around the bend above. It was plain that several of our balls from Major Stewart's battery struck the boat, but the amount of damage was not known at the time. These gentlemen now bring the report,our line--one piece near my tent. Hamilton's artillery replied to the boats, and they soon moved out of range, when Captain Stewart, with his Parrott guns, went two miles up the bluff and opened on the boats. Most of his guns threw over the boats, and the enemy's balls did not reach us. Adjutant Hammond and I were with Captain Stewart, and helped the men to place the guns in position a number of times. They were just going to fire one of the guns, when Hammond and I retired some ten or twel