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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 2: preliminary rebellious movements. (search)
isintegrating poison, known as the .doctrine of Supreme State Sovereignty, into the public mind of the Slave-labor States, for the purpose of meeting a contingency which he contemplated as early as the year. 1812. The now [1865] venerable Rear-admiral Stewart, in a letter to George W. Childs, of Philadelphia, relates a conversation between himself and Mr. Calhoun, in Washington City, in the winter of 1812:--You in the South, said Stewart, are decidedly the aristocratic portion of this Union; yoStewart, are decidedly the aristocratic portion of this Union; you are so, in holding persons in perpetual slavery; you are so, in every domestic quality; so in every habit of your lives, modes of living, and action. You neither work with your hands, head, nor any machinery, but live. and lave your being, not in accordance with the will of your Creator, but by the sweat of slavery; and yet you assume all the attributes, professions, and advantages of Democracy. Mr. Calhoun replied:--I admit your conclusions in respect to us Southerners. That we are. esse
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 12: the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the Ideas and policy of the Government. (search)
as also informed that supplies must go into Sumter peaceably, if possible, if not, by force, as the Governor might choose. Mr. Fox arrived in the city of New York the second time, on his important errand, on the evening of the 5th of April, and delivered to Colonel H. L. Scott, of the staff of the General-in-Chief, a copy of his instructions. That officer ridiculed the idea of relieving Sumter,.and stood as an obstacle in the way as far as possible. The plan was highly approved by Commodores Stewart and Stringham; and, as Mr. Fox's orders were imperative, he performed his duty in spite of all official detentions, and with that professional Gustavus Vasa Fox. skill, untiring industry, and indomitable energy which, as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, he displayed throughout the entire war that ensued, he fitted out the expedition (having made some previous preparations) within the space of forty-eight hours. He sailed on the morning of the 9th, with two hundred recruits, in the s
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
by citizens of Baltimore. The mob was quieted by four o'clock in the afternoon, when they had placed the city in the hands of the secessionists. At that hour a great meeting of the dominant party was held at Monument Square, where General George H. Stewart (who afterward joined the insurgents in Virginia General Stewart's abandoned mansion and beautiful grounds around it, at the head of Baltimore Street were taken possession of by the Government, and there the Jarvis Hospital, one of tGeneral Stewart's abandoned mansion and beautiful grounds around it, at the head of Baltimore Street were taken possession of by the Government, and there the Jarvis Hospital, one of the most perfect of its kind, was established for the use of disabled soldiers during the war. It was one of the most beautiful situations in or near Baltimore. It was on an eminence that overlooked a large portion of the city, the Patapsco, the harbor, and the land and water out to Chesapeake Bay. The mansion was built by the father of Brantz Mayer, a leading citizen of Baltimore.) had paraded the First Light Division with ball cartridges. Over the platform for the speakers floated a white f