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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
apt. John H. Gallager; 7th W. Va., Lieut.-Col. Isaac B. Fisher. Third division, Brig.-Gen. Gershom Mott. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. P. Regis de Trobriand: 20th Ind., Maj. William Orr; 1st Me. Heavy Art'y, Col. Russell B. Shepherd; 17th Me., Capt. William Hobson; 40th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Madison M. Cannon; 73d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Michael W. Burns; 86th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Nathan H. Vincent; 124th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Charles H. Weygant; 99th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Peter Fritz, Jr.; 110th Pa., Capt. William Stewart; 2d U. S. Sharp-shooters, Maj. James E. Doughty. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Byron R. Pierce: 1st Mass. Heavy Art'y, Maj. Nathaniel Shatswell; 5th Mich., Col. John Pulford; 93d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Benjamin C. Butler; 57th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Lorenzo D. Bumpus; 84th Pa. (4 co's), Capt. Samuel Bryan; 105th Pa., Capt. James Miller; 141st Pa., Col. Henry J. Madill; 1st U. S. Sharp-shooters (2 co's), Capt. Benjamin M. Peck. Third Brigade, Col. John Ramsey: 11th Mass. (batt'n), Lieut.-Col. Char
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
's Mate, J. H. Mallon; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistant, Wm. Doyle; Acting-Second-Assistant, Bernard Martin; Acting-Third-Assistants, R. G. Watson and Henry James. Sciota--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, J. H. Magune; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, R. P. Sawyer; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, B. H. Franklin; Acting-Ensign, Chas. A. Cannon; Engineers: Second-Assistants, Wm. F. Pratt and Daniel Dod. Sam Houston--Fourth-rate. Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, Martin Freeman; Acting-Master, Wm. Stewart. Port Royal--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Thomas M. Gardner; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, L. R. Boyce; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, F. K. Moore; Acting-Master, Wm. Hull; Acting-Ensigns, E. W. Snare and F. S. Hopkins; Acting-Master's Mate, E. V. Tyson, S. S. Bumpers, W. A. Prescott and Wm. Campbell; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Henry Moyles; Third-Assistant, W. C. F. Reichenbach; Acting-Third-Assistant, T. B. Brown. Tallahatchie--Fourth-rate. Acting-Master, Thos. J. Le
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
r our line of communication interrupted, but throughout the siege all kinds of supplies, whether of commissary, quartermaster, or ordnance stores, continued safely to be brought up to our advancing line. To the members of my staff I have occasion to renew my grateful acknowledgments for their habitual zeal, activity, and devotion in furthering my views throughout the siege. Col. T. E. G. Ransom, inspector-general of the reserves; Col. F. Anneke, chief of artillery; Maj. J. J. Mudd, Maj. W. Stewart, Maj. E. S. Jones, Capt. W. Rives, Capt. H. C. Freeman, engineer, and Lieut. H. P. Christie, all members of my staff, were unceasing in their efforts to obtain information and advise me of the successive movements, positions, and purposes of the enemy, and several times risked their lives by their near approach to his lines. Our reconnaissance particularly deserves to be noticed, in which on the second day before the evacuation Major Stewart and Captain Rives pushed their advance so
nstantly put spurs to his horse, and dashing over four miles of frightful roads, passed infantry, artillery, and cavalry, and, with only his staff for body-guard, entered the main street of Strasburgh just as Gen Bayard, commanding the advance brigade of McDowell, rode in. The First New-Jersey cavalry, Col. Halstead, came up shortly afterward, and with his regiment and the rest of his force, Gen. Bayard was ordered to press forward as rapidly as possible on the rear of the flying enemy. Stewart's Indiana and Sixth Ohio cavalry, under Col Zagonyi, who arrived very soon after, were also sent on, and in a few minutes Buell's and Schirmer's batteries, and the rest of the light artillery under Col. Pilsen, as fast as it could be brought to the front, were hurried ahead at full gallop. After a brief conference with Gen. Bayard, Gen. Fremont rode on with his staff. The morning for once was clear and beautiful, and the pursuit had every element of interest and excitement. The troops
rebels in this war occurred on Friday evening last, a short distance from this place. It was another of those desperate efforts they have from time to time put forth to recover lost opportunity and atone for past defeats. The surprisal of Banks by Jackson, though of a more formidable and successful character, was not more complete, sudden, and unexpected than the one experienced in this department. A part, some say a whole regiment, of the First Virginia cavalry, under the command of Gen. Stewart, crossed the Pamunkey from Prince William County, a few miles above this place, at a point known as Garlick's Landing. There they commenced a series of depredations, which had they been as successful throughout as they were at the beginning, would have resulted most disastrously to our cause in this quarter. With a fiendish ferocity, more akin to devils than men, the rebels began murdering all who came in their way. Men, women, and some say even children, black and white, were, without
our line of communications interrupted, but throughout the siege all kinds of supplies, whether of commissary, quartermaster's, or ordnance stores, continued safely to be brought up to our advancing line. To the members of my staff I have occasion to renew my acknowledgments for their accustomed zeal, activity and devotion in furthering my views throughout the siege. Colonel T. E. G. Ransom, Inspector-General of the reserves, Colonel F. Anneke, Chief of Artillery, Major J. J. Mudd, Major W. Stewart, Major E. S. Jones, Captain W. Rives, Captain H. C. Freeman, Engineer, and Lieutenant H. P. Christie, all members of my staff, were unceasing in their efforts to obtain information and advise me of the successive movements, positions and purposes of the enemy, and several times risked their lives by their near approach to his lines. Our reconnoissance particularly deserves to be noticed, in which, on the second day before the evacuation, Major Stewart and Captain Rives pushed their adv
ination, until paroled, at which time the enemy had buried their dead, and sent off most of their wounded. I herewith append a list of Federals killed and wounded, furnished me by Dr. W. T. McNees, Assistant-Surgeon of the Seventh Kentucky cavalry. killed.--Thomas Ware, U. S. Commissioner, Cynthiana Home Guards; Thomas Rankin, Harrison Co. Home Guards; Capt. Lafe Wilson, do.; Jesse Current, do.; Wm. Robinson, do.; Nathan Kennedy, Home Guards; James Atchison, do.; Simpson Eaton, do.; Wm. Stewart, do.; Lafayette Reading, Co. E, Eighteenth Kentucky volunteers; Wm. Preston, Co. I, do.; John Crawford, Seventh Kentucky cavalry; Jerry Lawson, do.; Samuel Plunkett, do.; Lewis Wolff, Newport, Ky., Home Guards; Wm. S. Shipman, do.; Thomas Hartburn, Cincinnati, Pendleton Guards. wounded.--Capt. S. G. Rogers, Co. I, Eighteenth Kentucky, slightly; Thos. S. Duval, Home Guards, arm amputated; Hector Reed, Home Guards, left side; J. W. Minor, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, left lung; Jacob Carver
Captain Taylor being on picket-duty; these constituted all the Captains from Franklin county, with the exception of Captain Stewart, who is mentioned in your report as having ably seconded you in the capacity of Aid on the retreat. In addition I bon, William Pettigrew, Alex. S. Kerr, Franklin Priest, Isaac Summers, Ben. F. Clifton, Calvin Rail, William Halsted, William Stewart, (fifer,) John F. Farner, Thomas Moffit. Robert Northern, William A. Kerr, Wm. O. Kerr, Jesse B. Stevens, Adam Pettn P. Hamilton, Jacob M. Davis, Benjamin Johns, Wm. Moffitt, Joseph McFerrin, John McFerrin, Joshua Small, John Strong, Wm. Stewart, James H. Smith, Isaac W. Cahill, Stephen Crandell, Jas. Heller, F. B. Cox, J. M. Stone, John Strong, Jacob Reynolds, s as well as the skirmishers, by firing from the house and out-houses, also from the woods near the house. I ordered Lieut. Stewart, who commanded a section of battery B, Fourth artillery, to come forward and open fire upon the house. He moved forw
is and Tate, and I believe, Captain Wylie, Captain Taylor being on picket-duty; these constituted all the Captains from Franklin county, with the exception of Captain Stewart, who is mentioned in your report as having ably seconded you in the capacity of Aid on the retreat. In addition I beg to mention Lieut. Bull, Davidson, RobinGeorge W. Turner, Ira Hudson, Alonzo Allison, William Pettigrew, Alex. S. Kerr, Franklin Priest, Isaac Summers, Ben. F. Clifton, Calvin Rail, William Halsted, William Stewart, (fifer,) John F. Farner, Thomas Moffit. Robert Northern, William A. Kerr, Wm. O. Kerr, Jesse B. Stevens, Adam Pettis, Wm. D. Hasper, Benj. F. Miller, Wm. H.illingsly, John H. Brin, John Conoway, John P. Hamilton, Jacob M. Davis, Benjamin Johns, Wm. Moffitt, Joseph McFerrin, John McFerrin, Joshua Small, John Strong, Wm. Stewart, James H. Smith, Isaac W. Cahill, Stephen Crandell, Jas. Heller, F. B. Cox, J. M. Stone, John Strong, Jacob Reynolds, left in hospital at Lexington, Ky.; Elijah
y B, Capt. Dudley, as flankers, to protect our left flank. We moved slowly and cautiously, but steadily forward. The skirmishers were soon fired on, but pressed forward with caution. On arriving near a house on our extreme left, surrounded on the south-west and north by timber, I discovered a large number of the enemy in and around the house. They had been annoying us as well as the skirmishers, by firing from the house and out-houses, also from the woods near the house. I ordered Lieut. Stewart, who commanded a section of battery B, Fourth artillery, to come forward and open fire upon the house. He moved forward his section of two pieces and threw several splendid shots, the first of which took effect in the upper story, causing a general stampede of their forces from that point, enabling us to go forward more rapidly and with less loss from their sharp-shooters. Their skirmishers opened a sharp fire upon ours, which made it necessary for us to push forward. We then opened f
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