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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nevada, (search)
7 Frank Bellacting Sept. 21, 1891 Roswell K. Colcord, Repassumes officeJan., 1891 John E. Jonesassumes officeJan., 1895 Reinhold Sadierassumes office April 10, 1896 United States Senators. Name. No. of Congress. Term James W. Nye39th to 43d 1865 to 1873 William M. Stewart39th to 44th 1865 to 1875 John P. Jones43d to —1873 to — William Sharon44th to 47th 1875 to 1881 James G. Fair47th to 50th 1881 to 1888 William M. Stewart50th to — 1888 to — Jones and Stewart still in Senate. 7 Frank Bellacting Sept. 21, 1891 Roswell K. Colcord, Repassumes officeJan., 1891 John E. Jonesassumes officeJan., 1895 Reinhold Sadierassumes office April 10, 1896 United States Senators. Name. No. of Congress. Term James W. Nye39th to 43d 1865 to 1873 William M. Stewart39th to 44th 1865 to 1875 John P. Jones43d to —1873 to — William Sharon44th to 47th 1875 to 1881 James G. Fair47th to 50th 1881 to 1888 William M. Stewart50th to — 1888 to — Jones and Stewart sti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stewart, William Morris 1827- (search)
Stewart, William Morris 1827- Legislator; born in Lyons, N. Y., Aug. 9, 1827; educated at Yale College; went to California in 1850 and discovered the famous Eureka gold deposits in Nevada county; studied law in 1852; became attorney-general of California in 1854; settled in Virginia City, Nev., in 1860; was engaged in the development of the famous Comstock lode; was elected United States Senator in 1864, 1869, 1887, 1893, and 1899. In 1900 he was chairman of the Senate committee on mines and mining.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Stony Point, capture of (search)
columns, the van of the right, consisting of 150 volunteers, led by Lieutenant-Colonel De Fleury; that of the left, 100 strong, also volunteers, commanded by Major Stewart. These composed the forlorn hope. They moved to the attack at two different points simultaneously, with unloaded muskets and fixed bayonets, followed by the l,—The fort and garrison, with Colonel Johnson, are ours. Our officers and men behaved like men determined to be free. At dawn the next day the guns of the Major Stewart's medal. fort were turned upon the works at Verplanck's Point, on the opposite side of the river, but Howe did not make the attack in time to dislodge the garr British repossessed themselves Stony Point on the 20th. Congress gave the thanks of the nation to the brave actors in this event, and voted a gold medal to Wayne and a silver medal to Stewart and De Fleury. The capture of Stony Point was regarded as one of the most brilliant as well as the most important achievements of the wa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Theosophy, (search)
ia, Australia, and New Zealand. The central office of the organization is at Point Loma, San Diego, Cal. The officers are: Katherine A. Tingley, leader and official head; Frank M. Pierce, secretary-general; E. Aug. Neresheimer, treasurer. Theosophical Society in America. The headquarters of the Theosophical Society in America are at Point Loma, San Diego, Cal. President, E. Aug. Neresheimer. American headquarters, 11 East Fifty-ninth Street, New York City. Eclectic Theosophical Society. An independent international body, with headquarters in New York City. John M. Pryse, president, 17 West Ninety-eighth Street, New York City. American Theosophical Association. President, Dr. J. D. Buck, of Cincinnati; vice-president, secretary, and treasurer, Dr. Stewart, of New York; executive committee, G. E. Harter, Chicago; William Main, New York; Gen. William Ludlow, Rhode Island; A. P. Buchman, Fort Wayne, Ind.; W. P. Phelps, New York; and J. D. Bood, Fort Wayne, Ind.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trials. (search)
after the battle of Monmouth; found guilty of, first, disobedience of orders in not attacking the enemy; second, unnecessary and disorderly retreat; third, disrespect to the commander-in-chief; suspended from command for one year, tried......July 4, 1778 John Hett Smith, for assisting Benedict Arnold, New York, not guilty......1780 Maj. John Andre, adjutant-general, British army, seized as a spy at Tappan, N. Y., Sept. 23, 1780, tried by military court and hanged......Oct. 2, 1780 Stewart, Wright, Porter, Vigol, and Mitchell, Western insurgents, found guilty......1795 William Blount, United States Senate, impeached for misdemeanor......1797 William Cobbett, for libelling the King of Spain and his ambassador, writing as Peter Porcupine in Porcupine's gazette, July 17, before Supreme Court of Pennsylvania; acquitted......1797 Thomas Cooper, of Northumberland, Pa., convicted under the sedition act of libel on the administration of President Adams in Reading Advertiser