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James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 96 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 69 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 60 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 49 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 38 2 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 33 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 24 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for A. P. Stewart or search for A. P. Stewart in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
ree, Fla., where the Federals suffered defeat. In the defense of Charleston he was an important factor, and during the Federal assault upon Fort Wagner, on July 22, 1863, he arrived with his regiment just in time to reinforce the garrison and crush the Federals. When Fort Wagner later had to be given up, he went to Christ Church Parish with his command and assisted the garrison at Sumter until 1865. After reaching the rank of Brigadier General, he continued to command a brigade of A. P. Stewart's corps during the campaigns in the Carolinas. At this time he was only 23 years of age, and was the youngest Brigadier-General in the Confederate Army. He was wounded three times, twice at John's Island and once at Olustree, where his horse was shot from under him. For some time he was in command at Florence, S. C., where he built a stockade for Federal prisoners and had charge of about 25,000. He made many friends among the captives for his humane and kind treatment of them, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.54 (search)
r's Division of the 2nd Corps, under Major-General Bragg, composed of Anderson's, Gibson's, Pond's, Chalmers' and J. K. Jackson's Brigades. The artillery of both corps followed their respective lines by the Pittsburg road. The 1st Corps, of not more than 8,500 bayonets, under Major-General Polk, was drawn up in a column of brigades deployed in line about 800 yards to the rear of Bragg. It was subdivided into divisions of two brigades each, Clark's Division, formed of Russell's and A. P. Stewart's Brigades; Cheetham's Division, of B. R. Johnson's and Stevens' Brigades, and, with the special reserve of three brigades under Brigadier-General Breckinridge, about 6,000 bayonets, constituted a reserve for the support of the attacking lines as might be needed on either flank. The cavalry, about 4,300 strong, was distributed for the most part to guard the flanks. With the exception of Forrest's and Wharton's (8th Texas) Regiments, lately regimented, insufficiently armed and wholly