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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Dugald Stewart or search for Dugald Stewart in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
te and enlarge the faculties, and form deep and thorough thinkers. Never was this so completely and so generally effected as it now is in Germany; and, as the object is attained, why should we complain or regret that it is not done by the means which we have usually considered indispensable? As to the peculiar character of these metaphysics, you will get all the information necessary from Mad. de Stael. They are undoubtedly very different from the metaphysics taught by Locke, Reid, and Stewart. The Germans reproach the English with treating such subjects psychologically, or, in other words, not sufficiently distinguishing the difference between ideas and sensations; and the English reply that the Germans are unintelligible idealists. The difference between the two is very great, and, moreover, it is, I think, a natural and constitutional difference. In England, from the character of the people and the nature of the government, which for a thousand years have been continually
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ter,—the good old Dr. Anderson, as Southey calls him in the Quarterly; Jeffrey, who was everywhere, in all parties, dances, and routs, and yet found time for his great business, and was, on the whole, rather pleasant in his own house; Dr. Brown, Stewart's successor, an acute man, but foolishly affecting a dapper sort of elegance, and writing poetry just above thread-paper verses; Dr. Brown sometimes in his lectures introduced passages of poetry, which he recited so beautifully that the studeor what occurred if a new coat made its appearance, exclaimed, Gott bewahre! such a thing never happened! Thomson, an elegant gentleman and scholar; and Morehead, at whose house I twice saw Dr. Alison, a dignified, mild, and gentlemanly man. Dugald Stewart was in Devonshire for his health, both mental and bodily; and, after him, I have but one person to mention, and him I must mention separately. I mean Walter Scott. He is, indeed, the lord of the ascendant now in Edinburgh, and well deserv
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
s somewhat excited by John Randolph in the House; but in the main I was rather dreary and homesick. April 25.—Yesterday we had quite a pleasant time at Menou's. French Minister. He has bought a small cottage, and after nearly rebuilding it and fitting it altogether in French style, he has made it a pretty little snug place for a bachelor. Mr. Webster dined there, General Van Rensselaer, M. de St. Andre, Prince Lieven, my old classmate Hunt, See ante, p. 7. Judge Johnstone, and General Stewart of Baltimore. We had a nice little dinner in the library, and a nice little time altogether. Afterwards William and I spent an hour with General Van Rensselaer, at the Livingstons, Mr. Edward Livingston and his family. See ante, pp. 350, 351. very gayly. All Washington looks rather trite to me. The divisions of party have infected social intercourse. . . . . The whole thing is much less gay and amusing than it was when we were here together. I have been very happy in my visit
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
a fair exchange, and if his guest had anything to say, he was sure to have an opportunity. Miss Edgeworth wrote, in 1835, After a visit made by Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor at Edgeworthtown. to a friend of Mr. Ticknor, thus:— I have been acquainted, and I may say intimately, with some of the most distinguished literary persons in Great Britain, France, and Switzerland, and have seen and heard all those distinguished for conversational talents; Talleyrand, Dumont, Mackintosh, Romilly, Dugald Stewart, Erskine, Sir Walter Scott, Sydney Smith, and Mr. Sharpe, the fashionable dinner-lions of London. I have passed days in the country-houses and in the domestic intimacy of some of them, and after all, I can, with strict truth, assure you, that Mr. Ticknor's conversation appeared to me fully on an equality with the most admired, in happy, apposite readiness of recollection and application of knowledge, in stores of anecdote, and in ease in producing them, and in depth of reflection not in
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
113. Stackelberg, Count, 460. Stael, Baron Auguste de, 128, 138, 139, 151, 155, 312; letter from, 313; writings, 314 and note. Stael, Mad. de, work on Germany, 11, 98; opinion of Lady Davy, 57; work on England, 60, 61, 119, 126-130, 132, 133, 136, 138; death of, 151, 189, 213, 430; anecdote of, 497, 498. Stanley, Hon. Edward (Earl of Derby), 408 note. Stanley, Hon. Mr., 424. Stapfer, P. A., 130. Steinla, Moritz, 490. Stephens, Mr., 248. Sternberg, Baron, Ungern, 460, 483. Stewart, General, 381. Stolberg, Countess, 125. Stolberg, Leopold, 125. Story, Judge, Joseph, 40, 316 note, 339, 340, 361; letter to, 392. Stroganoff, Count, 462, 464, 465, 468, 491. Stroganoff, Countess, 462, 486, 487. Stuart, Lady, Dudley, 446 and note. See Bonaparte, Christine. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, 446 and note. Subaltern, by Gleig, 380. Sullivan, Richard, 12. Sullivan, William, G. T. studies law with, 9, 11, 12, 20, 40, 381. Switzerland, visits, 152-160. T Tagus River,