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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 102 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 94 2 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 80 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Charles P. Stone or search for Charles P. Stone in all documents.

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Gray, and Lang embodied resolutions which were adopted by those present, expressing their desire to contribute to the relief of families of volunteers of the city of New York who are now serving in defence of government and law, and resolving that a committee be appointed to solicit contributions of pictures or other works of art, to be disposed of at public auction; said committee to have power, also, to receive moneys presented in aid of the fund. Messrs. Gray, Lang, Hubbard, Huntington, Stone, and Baker were named the committee, with full power to forward the plan proposed.--N. Y. Evening Post, May 7. The Ithaca (N. Y.) volunteers arrived in New York on their way to the seat of war. They number one hundred and fifteen men, and are commanded by the following officers:--Captain, Jerome Rowe; First Lieutenant, James Tischner; Ensign, William O. Wyckoff; Orderly Sergeant, William Godley; Second Sergeant, Edwin C. Fulkenson; Third do., Edward Atwater; Fourth do., Dr. Tolbo; Firs
ns proceeded with the District troops, and about forty of the Second Texas cavalry went in the same direction. In addition to camp equipage and intrenching tools, they were provisioned for twelve days. Large trains of wagons crossed into Virginia at the Government Ferry at Georgetown throughout the day, indicating, it is supposed, that one or more regiments on that side have received orders to march. One of the Ohio regiments, it is expected, will soon take up its line of march to follow Col. Stone's column.--Hon. John Cochran of New York was authorized by the Secretary of War to have mustered for immediate service, under a United States Commission, for three years, a regiment of infantry, to be commanded by himself as Colonel.--Washington Star, June 10. The Fourth Connecticut Regiment over 1,000 strong, completely armed and equipped, left Hartford, Conn., for Jersey City on board steamers City of Hartford and Granite State. Four military companies turned out to escort them, and
A signal balloon was seen at a considerable elevation over beyond the chain bridge, on the Leesburgh Road, at night; supposed to have been sent up by the rebels, for the purpose of communicating intelligence to secessionists in or near-Washington.--Washington Star, June 15. A Little fight occurred near Seneca's Mill, on the Maryland side of the Potomac, 28 miles above Washington. Lieut.-Col. Everett, in command of three companies of District Volunteers, 200 men, (a detachment of Col. Stone's column,) started in canal boats from Georgetown, D. C., and were obliged to leave after a few miles up, the rebels having cut the dam. At Seneca the detachment was fired upon by 100 cavalry, on the Virginia side of the river. Col. Everett marched his men into the dry bed of the canal, and, sheltered by the opposite bank, returned the cavalry fire. Shots were exchanged for some time across the Potomac, a distance of seven-eighths of a mile. None of Col. E.'s men were injured. Two Virg
failed to gain support.--The good behavior of the soldiers is having an excellent effect upon the townspeople. Many of the families were prepared to leave on the arrival of the army, but are now going to remain, feeling that their property and persons are secure.--Three members of the New York Ninth Regiment yesterday arrested Lieut. Harlett, of the rebel cavalry force, while secreted in a house here. This officer is said to have commanded the troops that fired from Harper's Ferry upon Colonel Stone's brigade when passing opposite that point.--The jail where John Brown was imprisoned, and the scene of his execution, are constantly visited by our volunteers. Captain McMullen's Rangers have found numerous secreted arms.--A mail bag belonging to our army, and filled with matter, has been found here. Indications show it to have been stolen, while on the way to Martinsburg, a week since.--Major Ledlie, of the New York Nineteenth Regiment, this morning at 1 o'clock, was fired on, when m
The Senate of the United States confirmed numerous army appointments. Among them are Major-Generals McClellan, Fremont, Dix, and Banks; and Brigadier-Generals Hooker, Curtis, McCall, Sherman, Lander, Kelly, Kearney, Pope, Heintzelman, Porter, Stone, Reynolds, Hunter, Franklin, Rosecrans, Buell, Mansfield, McDowell, and Meigs.--Philadelphia Inquirer, August 5. The Twenty-ninth Regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, under the command of Colonel John K. Murphy, left Hestonville, West Philade, was published.--(Doc. 158.) The First Regiment of New Hampshire State Militia, under the command of Colonel Mason W. Tappan, passed through Philadelphia on their return from the seat of war. This regiment composed part of the command of Col. Stone, and marched to Harper's Ferry, Va. They have been principally on guard duty, and had a skirmish with the rebels at Harper's Ferry. The men have performed marches on foot to the extent of one hundred and sixty miles since they left Washington.
Sept. 6. To-day the National Guard at Conrad's Ferry, on the Potomac, discerned a body of rebels at work across the river, which, on inspection with glasses, proved to be the erection of a two-gun battery. Word was sent to General Stone's Headquarters, and a section of a battery was soon provided. The rebels discharged two shells without effect, which were responded to with spherical-case shot, causing a splendid specimen of racing by the rebels. The distance between the two batteries was not less than three-quarters of a mile.--National Intelligencer, Sept. 12. This morning at eleven o'clock, General Grant, with two regiments of infantry, one company of light artillery, and two gunboats, took possession of Paducah, Kentucky. He found secession flags flying in different parts of the city, in expectation of greeting the arrival of the Southern army, which was reported three thousand eight hundred strong, sixteen miles distant. The loyal citizens tore down the secession
he New York, Massachusetts, and Michigan regiments, were sent from Richmond, Va., to Castle Pinckney, in Charleston harbor. Among them were Colonel Wilcox, of the Michigan First; Colonel Corcoran, of the New York Sixty-ninth; Lieut.-Colonel Neff, of the Second Kentucky; Major John W. Potter, of the Thirty-eighth New York; Rev. G. W. Dodge, Chaplain of the Eleventh New York; Rev. H. Eddy, Chaplain Second Connecticut; Surgeons Griswold, of the Thirty-eighth New York; Grey, United States Army; Stone, United States Army; Connelly, Second New York; Harris, Second Rhode Island; Captains Downey, Eleventh New York; Fish, Third New York; Farish, Seventy-ninth New York; Drew, Second Vermont; Shurtleff, Seventh Ohio; L. Gordon, Eleventh Massachusetts; Whitington and Jenkins, New York Twenty-fifth; Lieutenants Fay, New York Twenty-fifth; Hamblin, son of the actor of that name, Thirty-eighth New York; Underhill, Eleventh New York; Worcester, Seventy-first New York; Dempsey, Second New York; Wilco
October 21. Twenty-one hundred men of the Fifteenth and Twentieth Massachusetts, the First California, and the Tammany regiments; the First U. S. Artillery, and Rhode Island battery, with five pieces of artillery, crossed the Potomac at Harrison's Island or Ball's Bluff, under command of Colonel E. D. Baker, to support reconnoissances above and below, under the general direction of Brig.-Gen. Stone. At about four P. M., they were suddenly attacked by a body of five thousand rebels under the Confederate General Evans. Unable through the disparity of numbers to hold their position, they were driven back to the river, and there, as no adequate means to pass the stream had been made, they were driven into it, or slaughtered on the bank. National loss: Killed, one hundred and fifty; wounded, one hundred and fifty; prisoners, five hundred.--(Docs. 35, 99.) The gunboat Conestoga having made a reconnoissance up the Tennessee River as far as the State line, returned to Cairo, Ill
scat. The steamship Ella Warley, formerly the Isabel, from Nassau, ran the blockade, and arrived at Charleston, S. C., at daylight this morning. She was chased and ineffectually shelled by the blockaders. She brings a valuable assorted cargo and passengers, including Mr. Bisbie, formerly a delegate in the Virginia Legislature from the city of Norfolk. Mr. Bisbie is a bearer of important dispatches from Mr. Yancey, and has started for Richmond.--Charleston Mercury, January 3. General Stone, at Poolesville, Md., issued an order cautioning the troops under his command against encouraging insubordination and rebellion among the slaves, and threatening punishment to such as might violate his orders.--(Doc. 3.) An experiment was tried this morning for the purpose of determining whether the rebel battery at Cockpit Point, on the Potomac River, could be attacked, and if so, in what manner with the greatest hopes of success. At ten o'clock, the gunboat Anacostia approached t
and, could be thrown a distance of three and a half miles--the time of flight being thirty-one seconds, and the recoil of the gun-carriage about two feet. Filled with powder, the shells could be thrown much further.--(Doc. 31.) Brigadier-General Charles P. Stone was arrested in Washington this morning, at two o'clock, by a posse of the Provost Marshal's force, and sent to Fort Lafayette, New York harbor. The charges against General Stone are: First, for misbehavior at the battle of Ball's General Stone are: First, for misbehavior at the battle of Ball's Bluff; second, for holding correspondence with the enemy before and since the battle of Ball's Bluff, and receiving visits from rebel officers in his camp; third, for treacherously suffering the enemy to build a fort or strong work, since the battle of Ball's Bluff, under his guns, without molestation; fourth, for a treacherous design to expose his force to capture and destruction by the enemy, under pretence of orders for a movement from the commanding general, which had not been given.
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