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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 102 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 94 2 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 80 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1.. You can also browse the collection for Charles P. Stone or search for Charles P. Stone in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 6: Affairs at the National Capital.--War commenced in Charleston harbor. (search)
e the laws. The President, under better counselors, seemed disposed to do his duty boldly. It was evident that plans for the seizure of Washington City and the Government were fast ripening. Lieutenant-General Scott was called into cabinet meetings for consultation; and measures were taken for the military defense of the Capital, by the organization of the militia of the District of Columbia, and the concentration at Washington of a few companies of artillery, under the charge of Captain Charles P. Stone, of the Ordnance Department. It was also resolved to strengthen the garrisons of the forts on the coasts of the Slave-labor States, particularly in Charleston harbor. For the latter purpose, the naval force at hand was totally inadequate. The steam-frigate Brooklyn, which had lately arrived at Norfolk, after a three years cruise, was the only armed vessel of any importance on the Atlantic coast, the conspirators having managed to procure the dispersion of the Navy in distant seas
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 20: commencement of civil War. (search)
s. Two days afterward, May 27. he was succeeded by General McDowell, of the regular Army, who was appointed to the command of all the National forces then in Virginia. Colonel Wilcox, who was in command at Alexandria, was succeeded by Colonel Charles P. Stone, who, as we have observed, had been in charge of the troops for the protection of Washington City during the latter part of the winter and the spring of 1861. Stone was soon recalled to the District, and was succeeded by the veteran ColStone was soon recalled to the District, and was succeeded by the veteran Colonel S. P. Heintzelman, of the regulars, who, by order of General Scott, took special care for the protection of the estate of Mount Vernon from injury, and the tomb of Washington from desecration. It is a pleasant thing to record, that while the soldiers of both parties in the contest during the struggle were alternately in military possession of Mount Vernon, not an act is known to have occurred there incompatible with the most profound reverence for the memory of the Father of his country.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 22: the War on the Potomac and in Western Virginia. (search)
-enforcements had been sent, and that he was organizing, for a diversion in his favor, a small side expedition, under Colonel Stone, of about two thousand five hundred men, including cavalry and artillery, who would take post on the Potomac, oppositough Harper's Ferry; and to send all available forces to cross the Potomac near the Point of Rocks, and, uniting with Colonel Stone at Leesburg, be in a position to operate against the foe in the :Shenandoah Valley, or to aid General McDowell when hrmy entered Martinsburg, where he was joined on the 8th by the Nineteenth and Twenty-eighth New York Regiments, under Colonel Stone, and on the following day by the Fifth and Twelfth New York Regiments, under General Sandford. Thus strengthened, Patterson immediately issued orders for an advance on Winchester, when it was found that the troops of Stone were too weary and footsore to be of efficient service. The order was countermanded, and on the following morning July 9, 1861. Patterson he