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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 102 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 94 2 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 80 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Charles P. Stone or search for Charles P. Stone in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
him, and, rough as I was — just out of the woods — attended, that night, a very pleasant party at the house of a lady, whose name I cannot recall, but who is now the wife of Captain Arnold, Fifth United States Artillery. At this party were also Mr. and Mrs. Frank Howe. I found New Orleans much changed since I had been familiar with it in 1853 and in 1860-61. It was full of officers and soldiers. Among the former were General T. W. Sherman, who had lost a leg at Port Hudson, and General Charles P. Stone, whom I knew so well in California, and who is now in the Egyptian service as chief of staff. The bulk of General Banks's army was about Opelousas, under command of General Franklin, ready to move on Alexandria. General Banks seemed to be all ready, but intended to delay his departure a few days to assist in the inauguration of a civil government for Louisiana, under Governor Hahn. In Lafayette Square I saw the arrangements of scaffolding for the fireworks and benches for the aud
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 19 (search)
line, which reached nearly to the ever-to-be-remembered Sandtown road. Then, by further thinning out Thomas's line, which was well intrenched, I drew another division of Palmer's corps (Baird's) around to the right, to further strengthen that flank. I was impatient to hear from the cavalry raid, then four days out, and was watching for its effect, ready to make a bold push for the possession of East Point. General Garrard's division returned to Decatur on the 31st, and reported that General Stone, man had posted him at Flat Rock, while he (Stoneman) went on. The month of July therefore closed with our infantry line strongly intrenched, but drawn out from the Augusta road on the left to the Sandtown road on the right, a distance of full ten measured miles. The enemy, though evidently somewhat intimidated by the results of their defeats on the 22d and 28th, still presented a bold front at all points, with fortified lines that defied a direct assault. Our railroad was done to th
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 22: campaign of the Carolinas. February and March, 1866. (search)
h, I rode to the head of General Howard's column, and found that during the night he had ferried Stone's brigade of Woods's division of the Fifteenth Corps across by rafts made of the pontoons, and trd on a log, watching the men lay this bridge; and about 9 or 10 A. M. a messenger came from Colonel Stone on the other side, saying that the Mayor of Columbia had come out of the city to surrender t, and asking for orders. I simply remarked to General Howard that he had his orders, to let Colonel Stone go on into the city, and that we would follow as soon as the bridge was ready. By this same the limbs of the trees, reminding us of a Northern snow-storm. Near the market-square we found Stone's brigade halted, with arms stacked, and a large detail of his men, along with some citizens, enar by, piles of cotton bags filled with corn and corn-meal, partially burned. A detachment of Stone's brigade was guarding this, and separating the good from the bad. We rode along the railroad-tr