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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 102 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 94 2 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 80 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain. You can also browse the collection for Charles P. Stone or search for Charles P. Stone in all documents.

Your search returned 41 results in 5 document sections:

George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 2: Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights—Darnstown, Maryland.--Muddy Branch and Seneca Creek on the Potomac—Winter quarters at Frederick, Md. (search)
f co-operating from Harrison's Island; but General Stone, in his official report, does not claim thd to Harrison's Island to assume command. General Stone says in his report that he was anxious to m-spring road. Colonel Baker was to judge, so Stone says, of the sufficiency of the mode of crossind all the troops of his own brigade. And General Stone continues: I left it to his discretion, afnecessary to retire upon Edward's Ferry, where Stone was then operating. As Baker formed his line n worthy the cause they were serving, says General Stone in his official report, officers and men, he flying Rebels. Hence the letter to me that Stone was in Leesburg, with very little fighting. Aowed. Instructions delivered on the road from Stone met General Hamilton: these were, to repair toself on the way to Baltimore with sixty men of Stone's Division as bad as his own, in charge of Liefor the day. At this time came the news of General Stone's arrest and confinement in Fort Lafayette[24 more...]
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 3: through Harper's Ferry to Winchester—The Valley of the Shenandoah. (search)
sing this gateway to the enemy. Our force was as follows: We had the brigades that wintered with us at Frederick, commanded by Generals Hamilton, Williams, and Abercrombie. This force was increased by the division formerly commanded by General Charles P. Stone, at Poolsville, and consisted of three brigades, commanded by Generals Gorman, Burns, and Dana. Only the first two were with us, and these were commanded by General Sedgwick, to whom, after Stone's removal and incarceration, the divisioStone's removal and incarceration, the division was assigned. We had also a force of some six thousand men commanded by General Shields, formerly Lander's force, which was ordered to report to Banks. Then there were about fourteen hundred nen, commanded by Colonel Geary, not serving with any brigade. This made up the whole of Banks's command. Banks's command, including railroad guards, etc., numbered 38,484, -made up of Banks's division, 15,398; Lander's (Shields's) division, 11,869; Sedgwick's division, 11,217. Without guards, etc.
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 6: battle of Winchester (continued)—Federal retreat across the Potomac to Williamsport. (search)
h many are coming in daily, who having been compelled to halt from exhaustion, after recovery found their way in by different routes. On the 24th, Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews reported his total loss to have been 3 killed and 17 wounded. Banks also reported that there were 189 men of Williams's division sick in hospital at Strasburg, and that 125 of them were left in the hospital at Winchester, and 64 not removed from Strasburg,--left there with two surgeons and attendants. At Winchester, Dr. Stone of the Second was left in charge. In addition to these surgeons, there were eight others who fell into the enemy's hands. General Shields, when he marched for Fredericksburg, left 1,000 sick and disabled men at Strasburg. Banks says, Surgeon King, division surgeon, exhibits the disposition of them, but does not say what it was. Of material, Banks makes the following statement: All our guns were saved. Our wagon-train consisted of nearly five hundred wagons, of which number fifty-fiv
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 8: battle of Cedar Mountain (continued). (search)
borne mortally wounded from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's arm was shattered; Major Cook was wounded, and a prisoner. In the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, Colonel Knipe was twice wounded, and was carried from the field; Lieutenant-Colonel Selfridge's horse was shot under him; Major Mathews fell, dangerously wounded: of its twenty company-officers who went into action, 17 were killed, wounded, or missing, and 226 of its rank and file. In the Fifth Connecticut, Colonel Chapman, Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, and Major Blake were missing, supposed to have been killed. In the Third Wisconsin, Lieutenant-Colonel Crane was killed, pierced with several fatal wounds, and great havoc was wrought among officers and men by a terrific fire of musketry which, falling upon their flank from the underbrush and the woods, swept the companies engaged with great destruction. Official Records, War of the Rebellion, series i. vol XII. part II. Official Reports of Generals Williams, p. 145, and Craw
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Index (search)
mander under Banks, 276, 277. Wounded in the battle of Cedar Mountain, 319. B Baker, E. D., Colonel of the First California Regiment, 67. Is ordered by General Stone to assume command at Ball's Bluff, 71; obeys the order, 72. Forms his line of battle, 73, 74. Urges on reluctant men to battle, 75. Confesses to Colonel Lee Jackson, 199, 200, 203, 235. Higgles over a point of military etiquette, 250. Stockings, peculiarity of, sent from Boston to the Second Mass. Regiment, 82. Stone, Lieut-Colonel of the Fifth Connecticut, in battle of Cedar Mountain, 305. Stone, Charles P., commands Federal forces in Civil War, 64. Directs military operatStone, Charles P., commands Federal forces in Civil War, 64. Directs military operations leading to the battle of Ball's Bluff, 65 et seq. His official report quoted from, 71, 72, 77, 79, 80. Is arrested, and confined in Fort Lafayette, 99. Strasburg, Va., occupied and fortified by Banks's corps, 173,174. Banks's retreat from, to Winchester (Va.), 201-224. Strother, Mr., his Recollections of a Campaign in