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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 102 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 94 2 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 80 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 51 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 32 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 19 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 13 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Charles P. Stone or search for Charles P. Stone in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 4 document sections:

under General Butler from toward Baltimore, and of those under Colonel Stone up the Potomac from Washington. The staff departments of his cence and mine. Mansfield, in command at Washington, notified Colonel Stone, on the Potomac line, that the Confederates were evacuating Harared Johnston might advance on Washington. On the 16th he informed Stone that the large force reported at Manassas Junction was probably thaght of having Patterson march from Hagerstown to Frederick and join Stone in a movement down the Potomac, from Leesburg, to meet one by Mc-Doained, and then move toward Charlestown, to which point he believed Stone was advancing from toward Washington, by way of Harper's Ferry; andly, toward Manassas Junction, promised reinforcements and said that Stone was in supporting distance, with all his force, opposite Harper's Fht to go at once to Shepherdstown, Charlestown, or Harper's Ferry. Stone suggested that from the latter place they could best threaten Johns
ection of that city and of the coming inauguration of Lincoln, both of which, he was led to believe, were threatened with violence. As the result of this, Col. Charles P. Stone was appointed inspector-general for the special purpose of reorganizing and arming the volunteer militia companies of the District of Columbia, in such a wers, and McDowell says it frustrated, for the time, a more important movement, which Ewell learned was to have been an attack on Manassas On June 10th, Col. Charles P. Stone began, with the District of Columbia volunteers, what is known as the Rockville expedition, having for its object the holding of the line of the Potomac frkirmishes near Seneca mills on the 14th, at Conrad's Ferry on the 17th, at Edward's Ferry on the 18th, at Harper's Ferry July 4th, and at Great Falls July 7th. Colonel Stone was reinforced from time to time with other volunteer troops from Washington. His headquarters were opposite Harper's Ferry July 6th, when he marched, with mo
opposite side of the Potomac; to keep up a connection with the Confederate force in the lower Shenandoah valley by a good turnpike that led from Leesburg across the Blue ridge, and to save for his army the abundant supplies of the fertile county of Loudoun. On the 15th of October General Banks' division of the Federal army was located at Darnestown, Md., about 15 miles due east from Leesburg, with detachments at Point of Rocks, Sandy Hook, Williamsport, etc.; while the division of Brig.-Gen. C. P. Stone, composed of six companies of cavalry, three of artillery, and the infantry brigades of Gens. W. A. Gorman and F. W. Lander and Col. E. D. Baker, was located at Poolesville, 8 miles north of east from Leesburg. The object in this disposition of so large a force was, not only to guard the right of the big Federal army that General McClellan was gathering at Washington, but especially to cover the important approaches from the northwest to Baltimore and the Federal city, particularly
on's ford. Quiet prevailed on the 30th; but the enemy made some demonstrations along the Opequon on the 31st, which were met by the cavalry. On that day Anderson moved back to near Winchester, and Rodes marched to Martinsburg and back, on a reconnaissance. Quiet prevailed September 1st, but on the 2d the enemy was reported as moving in force from Harper's Ferry and Charlestown toward Berryville. Early marched three divisions of infantry, preceded by cavalry, across the country to near Stone's chapel, on a reconnoissance, Vaughn's brigade of cavalry, which had been left at Bunker Hill, having been stampeded by Averell's, the enemy was enabled to get on Johnson's flank and rout the whole command, capturing wagons, etc. Rodes, who had been left at Stephenson's, learning of this attack, moved forward rapidly and drove the enemy back to Bunker Hill. In the afternoon, in consequence of this attack, Early returned to camps in the vicinity of Brucetown and Stephenson's, McCausland mov