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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
ement to General Hardee's right, on the left of General Polk's corps, while the remainder of General Breckinridge's division moved to the support of the extreme right. It was thus that the Kentucky troops found themselves in one of the most stubbornly contested parts of the field, being pitted against the command of General Sherman, where was found the most stubborn resistance. In the first assault Lieutenant-Colonel Anderson and Major Johnston, of the Third Kentucky, were wounded, and Captains Stone, Pearce and Emerson, Lieutenant Bagwell, commanding company, and Acting Lieutenant White, of that regiment, were killed; while Captain Bowman, Adjutant McGoodwin and Lieutenants Ross and Ridgeway were wounded. Later the brigade had a prolonged contest with a heavy force of Ohio and Iowa troops, and drove them with a charge, the Kentucky troops singing their battle song, Cheer, boys, cheer; we'll march away to battle, and driving everything before them. The loss was heavy, Captains Ben
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
was driving the enemy. The movement was a counterpart of Cheatham's attack at Perryville, on the left instead of the right. Polk's corps had its right resting on Stone's river This river, which is erroneously called by the Federals Stone river, was named from Uriah Stone, who, in company with James Smith, Joshua Horton and WiUriah Stone, who, in company with James Smith, Joshua Horton and William Baker, explored that region in 1766. An account of the remarkable occurrences in the life and travels of Col. James Smith, etc., written by himself, Lexington, Ky., printed by John Bradford, Main street, 1799. with its left swung out in alternate fields and cedar brakes upon ground nearly level. Cleburne had struck Gen. A. Def was the battle of Murfreesboro. General Rosecrans' alignment was now somewhat the two sides of an isosceles triangle, with the railroad cut for one side, and Stone's river, with its rocky banks unfordable except at good intervals, for the other, and with its acute angle pointing to our center. He was thus unassailable on eit
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
hed for bravery and steady fighting, and are frequently mentioned in the official reports. It was late in the year when Colonel Hanson was exchanged. On the 13th of December, 1862, he was commissioned brigadier-general in the provisional army of the Confederate States. On the 31st of the same month came the tremendous battle of Murfreesboro, in which Hanson commanded the Kentucky brigade of Breckinridge's division. On the 2d of January Bragg noticed that Beatty's Federal brigade east of Stone's river enfiladed Polk's line in its new position. Bragg ordered Breckinridge to take his division and dislodge these troops. Lieut.-Col. S. C. Kniffin, of the staff of the Union General Crittenden, says: In the assault that followed a brief cannonade, Hanson's left was thrown forward close to the river bank, with orders to fire once, then charge with the bayonet. On the right of Beatty was Col. S. W. Price's brigade, and the charge made by Hanson's Sixth Kentucky was met by Price's Eight