hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 35 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 29 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 11 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 11 3 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stone or search for Stone in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 2 document sections:

lped several of the Federal wounded and dead, for which ample apology was made at the time. Regimental History. In General Bragg's battles at Murfreesboro and Stone's river, North Carolina had engaged these regiments: Twenty-ninth, Thirty-ninth and Sixtieth Col. R. B. Vance, after the death of Gen. J. E. Rains, commanded the Sin the cedars. The movement was successful, and the brigade remained that night on the field. Colonel McDowell makes this report of his regiment in the action at Stone's river on the 2d of January: On Friday, in the afternoon, we occupied Stone's river, and formed line of battle in rear of Hanson's and Pillow's brigades to supporStone's river, and formed line of battle in rear of Hanson's and Pillow's brigades to support them in the advance. About 4 o'clock we were ordered to advance, which we did in good order; engaged the enemy, and kept driving him before us until sunset, when it became apparent that he was strongly reinforced and flanking us, and we were ordered to fall back. The North Carolina losses in these battles were 10 killed, 144 wo
giments. On the Federal side, Biddle faced Pettigrew and part of Stone's brigade, and Meredith fronted Brockenbrough. Stone's men faced bStone's men faced both north and west, and were in formidable position on a ridge and behind a stone fence. To his right was Cutler, and then Baxter and Paul. wn forward on Iverson's flank, and also by a more distant fire from Stone's men. So long as Stone held his position, his line with that of CuStone held his position, his line with that of Cutler and Robinson's division constituted what is known as a demi-bastion and curtain, and every force, says Doubleday, that entered the anglent uncovered Daniel's front, and he went into direct action against Stone and his reinforcements; but sent Colonel Kenan with the Forty-thirdwen with the Fifty-third, to aid Iverson and his own left. Some of Stone's men were advantageously posted in a railroad cut, and were assistor wounded, and Rowley's division suffered in the same proportion. Stone reported that two-thirds of his brigade had fallen. Hardly a field