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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 35 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 29 5 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 11 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 11 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stone or search for Stone in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

lant young Frenchman, as devoted to the cause of the Confederacy as he had been, nay, as he still is, to the Bourbon Lilies Polignac had lately joined Taylor's army and had been put in command of a brigade of Texas infantry. The territory is one of numerous watercourses, treacherous rivers interspersed with more treacherous bayous. Recent rains had made the roads, already bad, impassable for the movement of troops. Polignac, with a small force of infantry, under Colonel Taylor and Lieutenant-Colonel Stone, cavalry under Captain Randle, and Faries' battery, had so skillfully handled his men that the expedition was made practically a useless exhibition of force. He was gallantly assisted by Capt. T. A. Faries, of the Pelican (Louisiana) battery, against the flotilla, whose main damage had been done by firing not less than 1,000 rounds out of 24 and 32-pounders, and by shelling, out of 12-pounder Parrott rifles, the banks between Trinity and Harrisonburg, as well as the two towns. It
roughout the campaign as his military adviser. None better could he have had than this soldier—as prudent as he was daring, as successful as he was prudent. About the middle of November Bragg advanced to Murfreesboro. From this point he planned to lay distant siege to Nashville. Rosecrans' own objective was Chattanooga, as had been Buell's, but his first aim was to sweep Bragg from his front. Bragg, who had gone into winter quarters, was quickly aware of Rosecrans' purpose. It was on Stone's river (December 26th to January 5th) that the army of Tennessee and the army of the Cumberland met for the mastery of the fields of Tennessee. If we read the rival reports both commanders lay claim to victory. In his losses, Bragg showed rather better than the enemy, having lost 10,000 out of 47,000, against the other's 12,000 out of 48,000. Adams' brigade—the Thirteenth and Twentieth consolidated, under command of Colonel Gibson; the Sixteenth and Twenty-fifth consolidated, under Colon
ters and pelted. Some of the enemy crawled up the bank and voluntarily surrendered themselves to escape the deadly stoning. By this time the men had warmed to the work. A fresh assault of the Federals, in formidable array, came up to the railroad. Major Barney, commanding the Twentyfourth New York, rode gallantly up to the very bank, on a fine bay horse. As he came close to it, and the horse had planted his four hoofs squarely on the embankment, the major was shot through the heart. Stone pelting had swiftly turned tragical. At his fall, his command became demoralized and fled in confusion. The bay, half dazed by the clamor, was finally captured. He was ridden by Lieutenant-Colonel Nolan, and remained with that brave soldier until his death on Culp's hill. He became next the property of Father Hubert, soldier-priest known and dear to every man in the army of Northern Virginia. Martial tradition has it that under Father Hubert the warrior bay learned to care no more for t
ile, capturing prisoners, guns and colors, and stopping only when darkness compelled a cessation of hostilities. On December 31st at the battle of Murfreesboro or Stone's river, Adams' brigade was detached from Breckinridge's division of Hardee's corps, and under orders from General Polk made a desperate charge against the FederaColonel Gibson in terms of the highest praise, and ends by saying, I will recommend Colonel Gibson, for skill and valor, to be brigadier-general. At Murfreesboro (Stone's river) he commanded the Louisiana brigade in the latter part of December 31st and in the memorable charge of Breckinridge's division, January 2, 1863. After thed by General Liddell captured arms, prisoners and colors, together with the papers and baggage of General McCook of the Union army. In the battle of Murfreesboro (Stone's river) his brigade was in the division of Major-General Cleburne, which bore such a conspicuous part in that grand wheel of one wing of the Confederate army, whi