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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 38 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 35 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 34 2 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 29 5 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 20 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 11 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stone or search for Stone in all documents.

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response from our friends across the water. Gen. Stone is directing the movement. The tenth and el did not design throwing either the force of Gen. Stone or Gen. Banks over the river; and that all that was really intended by Gen. Stone was to accomplish a reconnaissance in some force, without fighr or five thousand which the enemy had between Stone's command and Leesburg had been withdrawn, as ant of transportation. The order given by General Stone to Col. Baker was picked up with his hat, hought to have been killed, and 120 wounded. Gen. Stone telegraphs this evening, however, that many ; Minnesota regiment. The regiments composing Stone's command, and forming the right-wing. Theo 10,000 men. Col. Baker took command. Gen. Stone gave him 7,000 men, being Col. Baker's own bday, finding all quiet, and the commands of Gens. Stone and Banks in excellent condition, and fine ject of the movement (crossing the river) of Gen. Stone, was to secure the command of the Virginia s[3 more...]
response from our friends across the water. Gen. Stone is directing the movement. The tenth and el did not design throwing either the force of Gen. Stone or Gen. Banks over the river; and that all tr or five thousand which the enemy had between Stone's command and Leesburg had been withdrawn, as that account. A dispatch received from Gen. Stone's command just as we go to press, reduces thrned to Washington and that Generals Banks and Stone, intimidated by the threatening front presenteant of transportation. The order given by General Stone to Col. Baker was picked up with his hat, hought to have been killed, and 120 wounded. Gen. Stone telegraphs this evening, however, that many ; Minnesota regiment. The regiments composing Stone's command, and forming the right-wing. Theo 10,000 men. Col. Baker took command. Gen. Stone gave him 7,000 men, being Col. Baker's own bject of the movement (crossing the river) of Gen. Stone, was to secure the command of the Virginia s[3 more...]
y.--Major Palmer had an escort of six cavalry.--He was shot at four times, and what is remarkable, each of these four shots struck the same man and horse in the escort. One ball struck the horse, a second the saddle, a third the man, and a fourth the horse. None of them inflicted any serious wounds, the range being too long. The city has been filled to-day with the most absurd and frightful rumors I was told to day at Willard's by gentlemen who really believed what they said, that General Stone had been drowned, Gen. Banks taken prisoner, and that Gen. McClellan had ly escaped a similar fate by the most desperate riding. Then I was told that ten thousand men had crossed the Potomac at M thias Point, and were marching up to take Baltimore. Of course there was no foundation for either of these stories, but yet they were generally believed. Since the closing of the Potomac by the Confederates, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad is necessarily making extensive arrangements for