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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 138 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
re also made by Generals McCook, Garrard, and Stoneman to cut the remaining railroad communication w Under the directions of General Thomas. General Stoneman concentrated the commands of Generals Burected to send a cavalry expedition, under General Stoneman, from East Tennessee, to penetrate South the feasibility of this latter, however, General Stoneman was to judge. Sherman's movements, I hadct and facilitate the execution of this. General Stoneman was so late in making his start on this e now about starting from East Tennessee under Stoneman, numbering 4,000 or 5,000 cavalry, one from Vhburg or into North Carolina. I do not think Stoneman should break the road until lie gets into Vir; the other from East Tennessee, under Major-General Stoneman, toward Lynchburg-and assembling the r in Vol. XLVII. The expedition under General Stoneman from East Tennessee got off on the 20th oed to Slatersville. Subordinate reports of Stoneman's expedition and Canby's operations against M[1 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
rmy Corps. Brig. Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. Joseph Hooker in temporary command of the Twentieth Army Corps. July 27-31, 1864.McCook's raid on the Atlanta and West Point and Macon and Western Railroads, with skirmishes near Campbellton (28th), near Lovejoy's Station (29th), at Clear Creek (30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
Allatoona Pass all my available cavalry, General Stoneman to secure the east end and General Garraralry operated with General McPherson, and General Stoneman with General Schofield. General McCook loeneral Garrard's cavalry on the left, and General Stoneman on the right, and General McCook looking ross the Chattahoochee, and I also pushed General Stoneman's cavalry to the river below Turner's. ges and roads leading across the river. Generals Stoneman's and Mc-Cook's cavalry had scouted wellavalry acted with General McPherson, and Generals Stoneman and McCook watched the river and roads bs. At the very moment almost of starting General Stoneman addressed me a note asking permission, afved back to Conyers, where, learning that General Stoneman had gone to Covington and south on the eas position on our left. It is known that General Stoneman kept to the east of the Ocmulgee to Clinte of the enemy. He could hear nothing of General Stoneman, and finding his progress east too strong[7 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 8 (search)
. For special reasons no horse artillery was organized, but suitable mounted batteries, equipped as lightly as possible, were selected for service with the cavalry, and were assigned to, and served through the campaign with, the divisions of Stoneman, Kilpatrick, Garrard, and McCook. The cavalry commanders, and the army chiefs of artillery give these batteries, in their several reports, a high reputation for endurance and dash, praise which entitles them to the more credit since their organquently and necessarily were in unusually exposed positions, and not unfrequently upon the actual skirmish line, the guns were always served with steadiness and effect, and in no instance, except in the battle of July 22 and the cavalry raids of Stoneman and McCook, on which occasions there were special exculpatory reasons, were guns abandoned or the enemy suffered to make captures. A manifest improvement was observable throughout in the use and selection of projectiles and in the judicious exp
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
ow, and then returned to Trickum. Brig. Gen. Ed. McCook was ordered to concentrate his cavalry division and take post on the left of General Schofield until General Stoneman's cavalry could arrive and relieve him. From a prisoner captured at Buzzard Roost we learned that the force defending the passage of the gap amounted to 11,0epair the road through the gap so as to facilitate the passage of infantry and wagons. On the 11th it was decided to leave one corps (Howard's), supported by Stoneman's and McCook's divisions of cavalry, and move to Snake Creek Gap with the balance of the army, attacking the enemy in force from that quarter, while Howard was kl Schofield commanding. Wood's division, of Howard's corps, on the left of Schofield's command, with Johnson's division, of Palmer's corps, on the left of Wood; Stoneman's division of cavalry holding a hill to the left of Johnson, and then McCook's division of cavalry holding the road leading from Burnt Church to Marietta, via Go
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
ourth Corps made preparations to remain near Buzzard Roost Gap for the purpose of holding the enemy at Dalton, if possible, while the rest of the army, excepting Stoneman's cavalry, was moving through Snake Creek Gap to turn the enemy's flank. May 11 the troops of the corps were disposed as follows: General Stanley to hold the gap, General Newton to hold Rocky Face and the roads leading around the north end of it, with General Stoneman's cavalry covering his left flank, and General Wood in reserve on Tunnel Hill. During the evening of this day and on the morning of the 12th the general movement was progressing and the Fourth Corps found itself alone, con and immediately ordered pursuit. The corps moved at once to Dalton and came upon the enemy's rear guard of cavalry there. We pushed forward toward Resaca, General Stoneman with his cavalry pursuing the direct route, McCook's cavalry on a road near the base of Rocky Face, and my corps marching by an intermediate road. We skirmi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
toward the right, and the Fourth Corps forming the left flank of the army, Sherman's brigade, of my division, was left on the top of Rocky Face, the other brigades being withdrawn and placed in defensible positions on the flank of the army, General Stoneman's cavalry being also on my left to observe the enemy and cover the flank. The enemy moved out a heavy force, threatening our left, which was first observed toward noon, composed of over twenty regiments of infantry and a large body of cavalry. General Stoneman was attacked, his pickets and front line being compelled to fall back. At this time I contracted my lines to get a better defense, and finding my force still insufficient called on General Wood for one brigade, as I had been instructed to do in such a case by General Howard. This brigade arrived promptly, with General Wood himself, and closed a gap in my line. The enemy, apparently satisfied with a demonstration merely, retired without attack. May 13, the enemy having
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
rigade, under Colonel Sherman, and I withdrew farther north along the ridge. On the evening of the 11th I was directed to take a position on the north end of Rocky Face, where I remained over night. At daylight on the morning of the 12th I was directed to march my brigade into the valley on the west side of the ridge, and took position in the north end of the valley, covering the approaches from that direction. The enemy threatened our front with a heavy force of infantry, driving in General Stoneman's cavalry, and I made ready to receive him, covering my lines with hastily thrown — up works. The enemy, however, withdrew from our front, after driving in the cavalry, and the night passed quietly, the men sleeping on their arms. On the morning of the 13th it was ascertained that the enemy had evacuated his works at Buzzard Roost Gap and retreated southward in the direction of Resaca. We moved on in pursuit, passing through the town of Dalton and down the valley on the east side of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
emy's position against a direct attack having become thoroughly patent, during the afternoon and night of the 11th a movement was commenced by all the forces in front of the enemy, less the Fourth Corps, to unite with the Army of the Tennessee and pass to the south and rear of the enemy. Having discovered the withdrawal of our forces, the enemy, on the afternoon of the 12th, commenced a counter movement, the object of which was to turn our extreme left, then held by the cavalry, under General Stoneman, and the Second Division, of the Fourth Corps (General Newton). The movement was early discovered by the signal officers on the northeastern point of the crest of Rocky Face Ridge. General Newton reported his position as perilous and asked for assistance. I immediately moyed with the First and Third Biigades of the division to his support; but the reenforcement was not in the end needed, as the enemy, after a bold display of force, and apparently inviting a movement, which if boldly pu
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 91 (search)
t's division, of Hood's corps, during the fight. Carlin reports just now that he detects the enemy engaged in preparing for the use of artillery at two points on his front. He thinks he hears the hum and suppressed noises which usually attend the secret movement of large bodies of troops, and as a consequence anticipates an attack to-night or early to-morrow. In my opinion, assuming an intention on the part of the enemy to attack, Schofield's position on the hill (that lately occupied by Stoneman) is the true object.of their movement. That once firmly in their possession the positions of King and Carlin are at their mercy. Unless the arrangements for its defense have been improved since 6 o'clock this afternoon it will not be held against a strong attack. I have addressed a note to General Schofield on the subject, which goes out with this. Very respectfully, John M. Palmer, Major-General. Brig. Gen. W. D. Whipple, Chief of Staff, Department of the Cumberland. Itinerar
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