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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 68 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 11 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 26 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 20 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence. You can also browse the collection for Stoneman or search for Stoneman in all documents.

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k, I crossed the Monocacy, and continued the march throughout the night, via Liberty, New Market, and Monrovia, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, where we cut the telegraph wires and obstructed the railroad. We reached at daylight Hyattstown, on McClellan's line of communication with Washington, but we found only a few waggons to capture, and pushed on to Barnesville, which we found just vacated by a company of the enemy's cavalry. We had here corroborated what we had heard before, that Stoneman had between four and five thousand troops about Poolesville and guarding the river fords. I started directly for Poolesville, but instead of marching upon that point, I avoided it by a march through the woods, leaving it two or three miles to my left, and getting into the road from Poolesville to the mouth of the Monocacy. Guarding well my flanks and rear, I pushed boldly forward, meeting the head of the enemy's force going towards Poolesville. I ordered the charge, which was responded t
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 20: (search)
off into the woods were taken prisoners. We learned from these prisoners that the force consisted of three corps d'armee-the 5th, 11th, and 12th; that their destination was Germana Ford and Chancellorsville; and that their cavalry, under General Stoneman's command, was to march towards Culpepper Court-house. In accordance with this information General Stuart resolved to leave William Lee's brigade behind to impede as much as possible Stoneman's advance, and with Fitz Lee's command to fall aStoneman's advance, and with Fitz Lee's command to fall again upon the enemy's flank. By the time we reached Racoon's Ford it was already dark, and after crossing the river we dismounted here for an hour to feed our horses. The night was wet and chilly, a fine sleet drizzling down incessantly; and we felt cold, hungry, and uncomfortable, when, after a short rest, we rode on again through the darkness. We were marching along the plank-road, which, coming from Orange Court-house, strikes across that leading from Germana to Chancellorsville, at a sma
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 23: (search)
Chapter 23: Start after Stoneman. I am reported killed. headquarters near Orange Court-house. Stonewall Jackson's death. Reorganisation of the army. headquarters once more at Culpepper. great review of the cavalry corps. great cavalry battle at Brandy Station, 9th June 1863. Whilst the bulk of our army was mvoice in the morning calling me up to ride with him to General Lee's, whose headquarters were fixed in the old spot near Fredericksburg. Here we first heard of Stoneman's raid in the direction of Richmond. Leaving one of his brigades to occupy William Lee's command, the General, with a body of several thousand cavalry, had cros interred with all the honours of the State of Virginia. To this demand, General Lee sent the following characteristic reply: Can't spare it: it's in pursuit of Stoneman. Our headquarters were established on one of the hills forming a semicircle round one side of the beautiful little valley in which the pleasant village of Ora