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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 68 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 11 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 26 2 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 20 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Stoneman or search for Stoneman in all documents.

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e. General Burnside had only allowed time for transporting pontoons from Alexandria, when they had to be first transported to that place from Berlin. Delay was therefore entirely unavoidable, and, on investigation of the matter by General Burnside, General Woodbury was exonerated from all blame. General Hooker relieved General Burnside from his command on the twenty-fifth of January, but no advance movement was attempted till near the end of April, when a large cavalry force, under General Stoneman, was sent across the upper Rappahannock, toward Richmond, to destroy the enemy's communications, while General Hooker, with his main army, crossed the Rappahannock and the Rapidan above their junction, and took position at Chancellorsville, at the same time General Sedgwick crossed near Fredericksburgh, and stormed and carried the heights. A severe battle took place on the second and third of May, and on the fifth our army was again withdrawn to the north side of the river. For want
h the district indicated. The rebels have evidently obtained a supply of railroad-iron from some source within the last year. The writer hereof, while on General Stoneman's raid, in the spring of last year, had his attention particularly called to the condition of the tracks of several roads. It was badly worn and peeled off statement is, in the main, correct. The raid is no doubt intended to interrupt communication between General Lee's army and Richmond, but it is hoped that, like Stoneman's raid last spring, it may prove a failure. Passengers by the Fredericksburgh train, last night, state that the Yankee force consisted of one brigade of cavalas a robber. Streight and his mounted brigands lay waste and burn and plunder several counties in North-Alabama--they are taken and treated as prisoners of war. Stoneman, Spears, Kilpatrick, ride when they please up to the fortifications of Richmond, robbing the houses and hen-coops, stealing the very spoons and clothing, carryin