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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 68 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 45 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 27 11 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 26 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 26 4 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 20 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: May 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Stoneman or search for Stoneman in all documents.

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The paroled story. --Mr. James Harrison, who was charged upon the authority of Lieut. Lee in the New York Tribune with asserting to him (Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply ty of Lieut. Lee in the New York Tribune with asserting to him (Lee) in the Libby prison, that three hundred of Stoneman's Yankees could have entered this city and destroyed a great deal of property, and gotten off safely, utterly denies the story. He asserts, on the contrary, that he assumed that the city was so well guarded that Stoneman could not have reached it at all — making his remark to this effect in reply to Lee, who contended that the city could have been surprised by a small forc