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n. Sixth corps, at New Baltimore. Ninth corps, with Stoneman's and Whipple's divisions, on both sides of the river, inps over the river; and the two remaining divisions of General Stoneman's corps in readiness to cross at the lower ford in suntioned, that on the evening of the twelfth I ordered General Stoneman, with two divisions of his corps, to a point near the command was about twenty six thousand strong, two of General Stoneman's divisions having reported to General Franklin. Pon our left seems probable, as far as can now be judged. Stoneman has been directed to cross one division to support our leved a half mile, and halted without serious loss. One of Stoneman's divisions ordered across (at twelve o'clock this divisiurther attempt was made to carry this point in the west. Stoneman's two divisions (Birney's and Sickles') were conspicuous of Meade's division. I beg to refer to the report of General Stoneman for a correct understanding of the movement of these
later. Reynolds has been forced to develop his whole line — an attack of some force of enemy's troops on our left seems probable, as far as can now be judged. Stoneman has been directed to cross one division to support our left. Report of cavalry pickets from the other side of the river, that the enemy's troops were moving down the river on this side during the latter part of the night. Howe's pickets reported movements in their front, same direction. Still they have a strong force well posted with batteries her
oops are working around the rebel left flank. Kilpatrick occupies our right with his cavalry. Stoneman is on the left. The failure of one or two storming parties is expected before Johnston can be crossed near Resacca, while Schofield is crossing on the left near Pelton. The cavalry, under Stoneman and McCook, commenced the pursuit early in the morning, and at the present writing they are engavalry, which this season is in excellent trim and superior to that of former seasons. McCook, Stoneman, and Kilpatrick, are dashing officers, who never refuse a fight, and invariably whip their antapatrick's division), Garrard, and Ed. McCook, General McCook connecting with the infantry. General Stoneman had an independent command, also, on the immediate left. At day-light the monotonous popping the centre, with General Schofield on the left, and the flank covered by the cavalry of Generals Stoneman, McCook, and Kilpatrick. These forces were drawn out in an irregular line, running north-
enth Pennsylvania, led by Colonel Mindel, of the former, the object being to flank the rebel right on the crest. Like the first, it failed after a gallant fight. Our troops withdrew about dark to their position occupied in the morning, and went into bivouac. The loss during both assaults will not exceed two hundred and fifty killed and wounded. It must be remembered that large bodies of troops are working around the rebel left flank. Kilpatrick occupies our right with his cavalry. Stoneman is on the left. The failure of one or two storming parties is expected before Johnston can be expelled. His attention will soon be called to other localities than Dalton. General Schofield, with his corps, to-day reached Newton's left, and this afternoon moved up Crow Valley, to the left of Rocky Face Ridge. He will possibly strike the enemy on his right flank, simultaneously with an attack on his left by a column now moving forward for that purpose. Should these flank movements succ
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
tion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Sufd men. Being wholly ignorant of the plans and movements of Generals Hooker and Stoneman, I deemed it probable that at the crisis Lee would call for Longstreet, and thtter might, perhaps, get through with a division. Had I been advised of General Stoneman's movements on the communications near Richmond, as I should have been, the idea of Longstreet's leaving would not have been entertained. General Stoneman's report, doubtless, will show that no part of Longstreet's army passed to Lee untat Suffolk, and also that Jackson was killed. * * * * * * * Very truly, George Stoneman. headquarters Army of the Potomac, February 15, 1865. Major-General J. Jitnesses from General Hooker's army. No higher evidence can be produced. General Stoneman had all the railways in his hands, just outside of Richmond. General Sloc
Rappahannock. During the presence of Longstreet's wing at Suffolk, Lee, with Jackson's wing, was confronted by the army of Hooker. Hooker was advised of every change in my front, and assured that I would hold Longstreet as long as possible in order that he might destroy Lee. He was urged to strike before aid could be sent to the Rapidan. Perhaps a division, or a portion of one, joined Lee, in spite of the interruption of the communications by Stoneman. Longstreet did not; for his horses and servants fell into our hands near Suffolk, on the fourth of May. No mention of his presence is made in any accounts of Chancellorsville, nor in the Southern history. Jackson contended with Hooker on the first and second of May, while Early fought Sedgwick, near Fredericksburg. On the third, Stewart succeeded Jackson.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. General Rousseau's expedition. (search)
d three miles from the latter place. The advance met a party of about twenty rebels, and captured three of them, who represented themselves as scouts detailed by order of General Johnston, and then on service for General Jackson, commanding a rebel cavalry force. They were taken by surprise at our approach, having had no intimation of our coming. We learned that a small cavalry force from General Sherman's army had been at Carrollton a few days ago, and had returned toward Marietta. General Stoneman's pickets were reported to be near Powder Springs, sixteen miles in advance of us. July 22d.--The expedition reached Powder Springs about eleven o'clock and found a Federal cavalry picket a mile beyond. They had heard of our approach from scouts, but supposed us to be rebels. Our true character however was discovered before we reached them. A general feeling of relief pervaded the command at being again within our own lines after thirteen days of hard marching in the enemy's count
en there the day before, but hearing that General Stoneman was getting in their rear, two of them hareme left, then held by the cavalry under General Stoneman, and the Second division of the Fourth coatoona and Ackworth, after which I pushed General Stoneman's cavalry rapidly into Allatoona, at the y across the Chattahoochee, and I also pushed Stoneman's cavalry to the river below Turner's. Gend rapid march, and ordering it to relieve General Stoneman at the river about Sandtown, I shifted Ged East Point. To accomplish this, I gave General Stoneman the command of his own and General Garrared back to Conyers', where, learning that General Stoneman had gone to Covington and south on the eas position on our left. It is known that General Stoneman kept to the east of the Ocmulgee to Clinte of the enemy. He could hear nothing of General Stoneman, and finding his progress east too strongd, which was endangered by the failure of General Stoneman to reach Lovejoy's. But on the whole, the[10 more...]
ds were also made by Generals McCook, Garrard, and Stoneman to cut the remaining railroad communication with Ammen. Under the directions of General Thomas, General Stoneman concentrated the commands of Generals Burbridgs directed to send a cavalry expedition, under General Stoneman, from East Tennessee to penetrate South Caroli. Of the feasibility of this latter, however, General Stoneman was to judge. Sherman's movements, I had no dollect, and facilitate the execution of this. General Stoneman was so late in making his start on this expedi one now about starting from East Tennessee, under Stoneman, numbering four to five thousand cavalry, one fromLynchburg, or into North Carolina. I do not think Stoneman should break the road until he gets into Virginia,labama, the other from East Tennessee under Major-General Stoneman toward Lynchburg-and assembling the remaind given to General Lee. The expedition under General Stoneman from East Tennessee got off on the twentieth o
m's relief. On his way through Nashville General Stoneman received instructions from me to concentrering his command. November twenty-third General Stoneman telegraphed from Knoxville that the main inridge was falling back toward Virginia, General Stoneman was again directed to pursue him, and desons of the main army in Middle Tennessee, General Stoneman's forces in the north-eastern portion of ean's station, on the twelfth of December General Stoneman started for Bristol, his advance, under Gturing, or dispersing the whole command. General Stoneman then sent General Burbridge to Bristol, wnd the railroad bridges over Ready creek. General Stoneman then turned his attention toward Saltvilley moved on Wytheville, and on returning, General Stoneman met them at Marion, where he made preparauring some of his wagons and caissons. General Stoneman then moved on Saltville with his entire cng the buildings. His work accomplished, General Stoneman returned to Knoxville, accompanied by Gen[1 more...]
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