hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

Your search returned 19 results in 6 document sections:

h of the Epiphany, Washington, and Military and religious writer (The Confederate Army). Captain F. M. Colston, artillery officer with Alexander (Memoirs of Gettysburg and many rare photographs). Allen C. Redwood, of the 55th Virginia, with Stonewall Jackson; later Artist and author (Confederate Reminiscences; Jackson). Brig.-Gen.M. J.Wright; later U. S. War Dept. Agent (Records of the War and statistics). Col. D. G. McIntosh; later Attorney-at-law (Artillery of the Confederacy). Cor was it to be expected or desired that Professor William P. Trent, a writer and scholar Southern born, should fail to emphasize the lofty personal traits of his hero, Lee; or that Mr. Allen C. Redwood, whose rare privilege it was to fight with Stonewall, should not portray his honest and frank admiration for the most surprising military genius developed by the Civil War. Particularly gratifying to the humanist is the sketch of Sherman, written from the standpoint of the most sympathetic di
Richmond, and, after sending J. E. B. Stuart on a scouting circuit of the Union army, he prepared for the offensive. The attack made on June 26th failed because Stonewall Jackson's fatigued soldiers, who All the original war-time photographs of Robert E. Lee: as presented in this chapter and in other volumes. I believe tgled in equal measure. But we must take up once more our thin thread of narrative. Burnside superseded McClellan, and Lee, with the support of Longstreet and Stonewall Jackson, encountered him at Fredericksburg, where, on December 13, 1862, the Federals suffered one of the most disastrous defeats of the war. Hooker succeeded Bund 69, a fourth on page 83 of Volume I, and a fifth on page 23 of Volume III. erate victory was dearly paid for, not only in common soldiers but in the death of Stonewall Jackson. Weakened though Lee was, he determined upon another invasion of the North—his glorious, but ill-fated, Gettysburg campaign. Was it justifiable befor
emained until President Hayes invited him to return to Washington and inaugurate his cherished plans of army administration. This pleasing professional situation continued until Sherman's retirement, in 1884. During his later years, he spent most of his time in New York among old army associates, attending reunions, making speeches at soldier's celebrations, and putting his papers in order for the use of future historians. He died in New York on February 14, 1891, aged seventy-one years. He was buried, as he wished, in St. Louis, by the side of his wife and his little son, who had died nearly thirty years before. Inconspicuous among the many generals who went to New York to do honor to the dead leader was a quiet old gentleman in civilian dress— Sherman's ablest antagonist in war, Joseph E. Johnston, and by the side of the grave at St. Louis was one of his old Louisiana colleagues, proud of his unique experience, a professor under Sherman and a soldier under Stonewall Jackson.
and Chapultepec. Fourteen years later he earned his sobriquet of Stonewall in the first great battle of the Civil War. Within two years more At last, one boy—the dullard of the class, usually—suggested, Stonewall and the men who bore his orders their honors came not easily te dawn of his brilliant career John Echols, Colonel of a Stonewall regiment at Bull Run; later led a brigade in Lee's Army. J. D. ughout 1862; last, at Fredericksburg. Isaac R. Trimble. where Stonewall was, there was Trimble also. Arnold Elzey, a brigade and divisirred upon Manassas field had become the veriest of misnomers; the Stonewall had acquired a marvelous mobility since that July day not yet a ythe writer heard that he was no other than our commander, General Stonewall Jackson. he wore a rather faded gray coat and cap to match—theorsville, for instance. But at Gettysburg, we were short just one man—who had been dead just two months-and his name was Stonewall J
a short time. On April 2, 1863, the Eleventh Corps was given him, and it was these troops that were so badly routed by Stonewall Jackson at Chancellorsville. In September, 1863, Howard and his corps were transferred to the Army of the Cumberland, and was augmented later by troops from three corps of the Army of the Potomac. A corps of the Army of Virginia checked Stonewall Jackson's advance Federal major-generals commanding armies: operating on the gulf and along the western frontierurned over the troops therein to Major-General John C. Fremont. This force co-operated with Banks and McDowell against Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah valley, and its principal engagements were those at McDowell and Cross Keys. On June 26, 186the Antietam campaign, did not reach Fredericksburg in time for the battle, and at Chancellorsville was badly routed by Stonewall Jackson, because its commander allowed himself to be surprised. In this battle about twelve thousand troops were prese
, February 20, 1893. Lieutenant-generals of the Confederacy—group no. 1 On this and the two pages following appear portraits of all officers who held the rank of Lieutenant-General in the Confederate States Army, with the exception of Stonewall Jackson and A. P. Hill, whose portraits have appeared among the general officers killed in battle. Richard Stoddert Ewell a battle record from July 21, 1861, to April 6, 1865. fought nearly three years on a Wooden leg. James Longstreet, and went to the Mexican War with General Taylor. He joined the Confederate army in 1861, serving first as colonel of the Ninth Louisiana Volunteers in the Army of the Potomac. He was promoted to brigadier-general in October, and served under Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah valley and in the Peninsula campaign. He was made major-general in July, 1862, and the following month was assigned to the command of the District of West Louisiana (Trans-Mississippi Department), where he remained un