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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. Address delivered before the Virginia division, A. N. V., October 31st, 1878, by Colonel William Allan, late Chief of Ordnance, Second ( Stonewall ) corps, A. N. V. [Published by unanimous request of the association]. After the disastrous termination of Braddock's campaign against Fort Duquesne, in the summer of 1756, Colonel George Washington, to whom was entrusted the duty of protecting the Alleghany frontier of Virginia from the French and Indians, established himself at Winchester, in the lower Shenandoah Valley, as the point from which he could best protect the district assigned to him. Here he subsequently built Fort Loudoun, and made it the base of his operations. A grass-grown mound, marking the site of one of the bastions of the old fort, and Loudoun street, the name of the principal thoroughfare of the town, remain to recall an important chapter in Colonial history. It was this old town that Major-General T. J. Jackson ente
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Monocacy-report of General John B. Gordon. (search)
t execution of orders, I am especially indebted. They rode in the midst of their troops under the severest fire, and exhibited that cool courage so essential in an officer on the field. There are many other officers of lower grade who well deserve particular mention; among them I desire to call attention to the admirable conduct of Colonel Peck, Ninth Louisiana, commanding Hays' brigade; Colonel Atkinson, commanding Evans' brigade; Colonels Funk and Dungan, commanding the remnants of the Stonewall and Jones' brigades, of Terry's command. I regret to state that my loss was heavy in both officers and men, amounting in the aggregate, as shown by tabular report of brigade commanders, to 698. Among the killed are Colonel J. H. Lamar and Lieutenant-Colonel Van Valkenburg, both of the Sixty-first Georgia regiment, of Evans' brigade, and both meritorious officers. Colonel Lamar, a most promising young officer, was shot from his horse at the head of his regiment. Several other regiment
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. (search)
nt, Colonel Nadenbousch commanding, was detached from the Stonewall brigade and deployed as skirmishers on the left of the roput the enemy to precipitate flight upon the town. The Stonewall and Steuart's brigades were formed in line of battle in ain attack upon the fortifications. For this purpose, the Stonewall brigade, Brigadier-General J. A. Walker commanding, was mthing could have been more timely than the arrival of the Stonewall brigade. Owing to a misconception of orders, for which Bcholls' brigade the remainder, except 900 captured by the Stonewall brigade. Eleven stands of colors were captured, of which the Stonewall brigade captured six, Steuart's brigade four and the Louisiana brigade one. For particulars as to the numbee observed that my force, until the timely arrival of the Stonewall brigade, did not amount to over 1,200 muskets, with a poreeded the whole number engaged on our side, including the Stonewall brigade. Before the closing of this report, I beg leav
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.47 (search)
The career of the Confederate Cruiser Stonewall. By Captain Thomas J. Page, C. S. N. [The history of the Confederate vessels which, despite great obstacles, made themselves the terror and theld form a most interesting chapter in the true story of our great struggle. The career of the Stonewall was a glorious one, and our readers will thank us for the interesting narrative of the gallant Captain Page.] In presenting this blurred picture of the Stonewall, its imperfections should be attributed more to the shortcomings of the artist than to the absence of intrinsic worth in the subject represented. The Stonewall, a small twin-screw ironclad man-of-war, was built in France by the then most eminent constructor in the Empire. Her tonnage, twelve hundred; armament, one three-hperor — in the case before mentioned — an example he conceived worthy of his following. The Stonewall had not, at this time, been baptized with the ever memorable name she subsequently bore, for s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Barbara Frietchie --refutation of Whittier's myth. (search)
Barbara Frietchie --refutation of Whittier's myth. Whittier's famous poem has been several times shown to be founded on a myth; but as it is being continually republished in collections of his poems, and has been introduced into several school readers which are widely circulated, it seems proper that we should place in permanent form the refutation of this slander of Stonewall Jackson and the brave men he led: Letter from General J. A. Early. Having seen in a recent number of the Dispatch a communication from Frederick, Maryland, to the Baltimore Sun, in relation to a letter from An ex-confederate to the Los Angeles (California) Bulletin, endorsing the authenticity of the oft-repeated story of Barbara Frietchie's flaunting the old flag in the faces of General Jackson and his troops, and being fired upon by the General's order, and also an article in the supplement to the Sun of the 24th instant containing two letters from Frederick to disprove the story; and having
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 12.89 (search)
e rear, laughing, chatting, smoking, probably engaged, here and there, in games of cards, and other amusements indulged in while feeling safe and comfortable, awaiting orders. In rear of them were other parties driving up and butchering beeves. The remembrance of the scene is as clear as it was sixteen years ago. So impressed was I with my discovery, that I rode rapidly back to the point on the Plank road where I had left my cavalry, and back down the road Jackson was moving, until I met Stonewall himself. General, said I, if you will ride with me, halting your column here, out of sight, I will show you the enemy's right, and you will perceive the great advantage of attacking down the Old turnpike instead of the Plank road, the enemy's lines being taken in reverse. Bring only one courier, as you will be in view from the top of the hill. Jackson assented, and I rapidly conducted him to the point of observation. There had been no change in the picture. I only knew Jackson sligh