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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson in Lexington, Va. (search)
utes he reviewed the resolutions, endorsed them, spoke of the dangers threatening the South, the duty of taking a firm stand, and then sat down. He displayed one quality of an orator not always exhibited by political speakers; when he was done he quit. The Frank Paxton spoken of in this connection, went out the next spring as a lieutenant in the Rockbridge Riflemen, and when he was killed at Chancellorsville, held the position of brigadier-general, and fell at the head of Jackson's old Stonewall brigade. His was as dauntless a spirit as that of his old commander, and they are quietly sleeping together in the Lexington cemetery. At the request of a young friend in the town of Lexington, who expected to be absent several weeks, I agreed to supply his place temporarily as a teacher in the colored Sunday school. Accordingly on the next Sabbath afternoon I repaired to the lecture-room of the Presbyterian church. I found the room well filled with colored children, whose clean clot
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
days, we remained in line of battle, and, with a force of not quite 9,000, threw down the guage to General Patterson, with his upwards of 20,000. I mingled freely among the men here, having old college mates in nearly every command, and I never saw men more anxious to fight — being eager to be led to attack the enemy at Martinsburg when it seemed settled he would not attack us. It was while we were at Darkesville that I first came in personal contact with the afterwards world-renowned Stonewall Jackson, who was then a modest Brigadier-General of two days standing. A col-porteur (a friend of mine) had sent me word that he desired permission to enter our lines to distribute Bibles and tracts. With the freedom with which in our army the humblest private could approach the highest officer I at once went to General Jackson for the permit. I have a vivid recollection of how he impressed me. Dressed in a simple Virginia uniform, apparently about thirty-seven years old, six feet high,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. by J. Wm. Jones. Paper no. 3.--down the Valley after Stonewall's quarter-master. I pass by the scenes of our winter quarters at Manassas, and of the falling back from that line of defence; for although there are many points of interest connected with these events, I can only in these papers touch on a few of the more important movements of our army. Ewell's division held the line of the Rappahannock, while Johnston fell back to Richmond of our division were all men of mark. Gen. Richard Taylor (son of Old rough and ready ) was a gentleman of rare accomplishments and a soldier of such decided ability, that he was destined to rise to the rank of lieutenant general, and give to Stonewall's quarter-master, (Gen. Banks) on his Red River expedition the additional sobriquet of Dick Taylor's commissary. Gen. Trimble rose to the rank of Major-General, lost a leg at Gettysburg and gave most untiring service to the cause he came fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.50 (search)
ound. The shaft rests on a handsome base and is very graceful in its proportions, and on reverse sides are the following simple and appropriate inscriptions: Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiania division, and from Manassas to Appomattox, 1861 to 1865. The statue itself is eight feet nine inches high, and the remark of an old soldier present, as the veil was drawn aside, but echoed the universal verdict of those familiar with the form and features of the great chieftain: That is old Stonewall, as I used to see him. The likeness is excellent, the form and posture well nigh perfect, while the old cadet cap, tilted on the nose, the cavalry boots, the uniform coat, the spurs, the sabre — all of the details of the man and his dress — combine to give not an ideal Jackson of the artist's fancy, but the veritable old Stonewall, whom we used to see standing on some roadside, along which his veterans were hurrying into line of battle. Indeed we could almost see him turn suddenly awa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
hat at the battle of Slaughter's Mountain when we learned from a prisoner that General Banks was in command of the forces opposed to us, it rang all along our line: Send in your requisitions, boys, for whatever you want in the way of clothing. Stonewall's Quarter-master --General Banks--has come with a full supply to issue. We have a kindly feeling for General Banks. He treated the people of the Valley much more leniently than his successors in command there. He has shown on occasion (not and had not suffered an attack and rout. It had accomplished a premeditated march of nearly sixty miles in the face of the enemy, defeating his plans, and giving him battle wherever he was found. An old Rebel must be pardoned for thinking that General Banks did not exert himself very strenuously to find his enemy on that memorable campaign, and that those were glorious days when we marched down the Valley after Stonewall's Quarter-master. How we came back will be seen in our next Paper.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
preciate the kindness of our people, and have just given a touching evidence of fraternal feeling which will be remembered. This being, by appointment, Hollywood Memorial day, the visiting Knights marched to the statue of Stonewall Jackson, on Capitol Square, and while their band played an appropriate dirge, they saluted the effigy of the great Chieftain, and placed a wreath around his neck, and flowers on the base of the statue. As we look out of our window on the bronze figure of old Stonewall, wreathed with flowers by Knights of Boston and Providence, we recall an eloquent passage in Governor Holliday's superb address of welcome: And now, if there be any animosities surviving, let them be buried in the graves of our great and loved ones on either side. With chivalric generosity let us do justice to virtue and valor whererever found. Remitting the camp followers, the shriekers and demagogues, both North and South, to everlasting oblivion, let the Puritan and the Cavalier, and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
t purpose of crossing the Massanutton by New Market Gap, and thus striking Jackson in flank if not in rear; but this purpose was defeated by our watchful chief, who sent parties to burn the White House bridge over the Shenandoah on the road to New Market, and the Columbia, some miles higher up the river. General Fremont pressed our rear with energy and gallantry, and some of the exploitsof his cavalry displayed a heroism which elicited the highest admiration of our men, although stern old Stonewall did say to Colonel Patton, who expressed to him a regret that three gallant fellows who charged alone through his regiment were killed: Shoot them, Colonel, I don't want them to be so brave. A number of gallant charges were made on our rear guard, and temporary advantages were gained, but Turner Ashby (who had recently won his wreath and stars, and was the idol of our whole army,) brought up our rear, and met these gallant dashes with a cool courage, which soon restored order, and usual
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Winchester in 1863. (search)
rolina regiment, who, with Private Owens, of the Maryland artillery, and some occasional assistance, manned the piece most effectively, driving the enemy back from the bridge at a most critical moment, as the regiments near, from want of ammunition, were unable to render any assistance. Up to this time my brigade (with assistance from the artillery) had alone sustained the attack upon the front and right. Brigadier General Walker now came up on my right with two regiments of his brigade (Stonewall) and rapidly advanced in line of battle through the woods, towards the turnpike. The Major-General commanding being engaged in a different part of the field, I directed two regiments of Nichols's brigade to cross the bridge and attack the enemy's rear, which was passing. At the same time General Walker was pressing them on their right, and thus hemmed in, they gave way, and many were taken prisoners — about 1.000 by my brigade and the remainder by General Walker. Four stands of colors we
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiseences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
our higher officers that our corps would certainly winter in the Valley — that he had gotten an intimation of this from General Jackson himself — and that he had ascertained that the General had rented a house for his family. We marched the next day for Eastern Virginia, and the glorious field of First Fredericksburg. So completely did General Jackson conceal his plans from his staff and higher officers that it got to be a joke among them when one was green enough to attempt to fathom Stonewall's ways. The men used to say, Well, if the Yankees are as ignorant of the meaning of this move as we are old Jack has them. The movement from the Valley to Richmond was so secretly planned and executed that army, people, and enemy alike were completely deceived. The reinforcements sent to the Valley from Richmond were purposely sent in such a public manner as to have the report reach Washington as soon as possible, where it had the effect of inducing Mr. Lincoln to order General McDowe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
nced. Soon Jackson directed those about him to dismount and shelter themselves, and Dr. Dabney found a place behind a large and very thick oak gate post, where he sat bolt upright with his back against the post. Just then there came up Major Hugh Nelson, of Ewell's staff — a gallant gentleman and a devout churchman, who had heard Dr. Dabney's sermon, and whose theological views did not fully indorse its doctrine — and, taking in the situation at a glance, rode direct for the gate post of Stonewall's Chief of Staff, and giving him the military salute coolly said: Dr. Dabney, every shot, and shell, and bullet is directedby the God of battles, and you must pardon me for expressing my surprise that you should want to put a gate post between you and special Providence. The good Doctor at once retorted: No! Major, you misunderstand the doctrine I teach. And the truth is, that I regard this gate post as a special Providence, under present circumstances. Just before the opening of t
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