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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 10 document sections:

J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
iage as when he marched forth so gayly at his country's call. He is borne on a litter—he has been shot through the lungs, his life-tide is ebbing away, and he has come home to die. On that memorable 27th day of June, 1862, at Cold Harbor, when Stonewall Jackson issued his crisp order, Tell General Ewell to sweep the field with the bayonet, and our whole line pressed grandly forward, carried every position before it, and persuaded General McClellan that it was indeed time to change base from be the same thing some days before, but the faculty had unanimously voted that it must be taken down, as Virginia was still in the Union.) The next morning, the president of the college, Rev. Dr. Junkin (the father-in-law of the afterwards famous Stonewall Jackson, but an ardent Union man all through the war), called a meeting of the faculty to ask what they proposed to do about the breach of discipline on the part of the students, as he regarded it, in again raising the flag on the college. P
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 3: influence of Christian officers—continued. (search)
ery at Lexington, in the Valley of Virginia, and two continents were bursting with the fame of Stonewall Jackson. Jackson gave a great deal of time to his colored Sundayschool. He was accustomed examples have ever told with such wondrous power upon the hearts of men. Is it surprising that Stonewall Jackson is invincible, and that he can lead his army to certain victory, whenever God's blessihe quiet Bible-reader and fluent talker upon religious subjects was none other than the famous Stonewall Jackson. He did everything in his power to encourage his chaplains and help them in their wees the soldiers thronging to hear the Gospel, and listens so attentively to the preaching, is Stonewall Jackson; those wreaths and stars which cluster around are worn by some of the most illustriousls with which we were favored were in answer to the prayers, and in blessing on the efforts of Stonewall Jackson, and to what extent his influence was blessed to individuals, eternity alone can revea
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 4: influence of Christian officers—concluded. (search)
. General John B. Gordon, of Georgia (now governor of that grand old Commonwealth), who rose from the captaincy of a company to command the remnant of the old Stonewall corps, and to win a reputation as one of the most brilliant soldiers which the war produced, was one of the most active of our Christian workers, and exerted a fesses. On the night before the last day's battle at Second Manassas, Friday, August 29, 1862, Colonel W. S. H. Baylor (I ought really to call him general, for Stonewall Jackson and R. E. Lee had both recommended his promotion, and his commission had actually been made out when news of his lamented death reached Richmond), one of before won its name and immortal fame on these historic plains. Sending for his friend, Captain Hugh White—son of the venerable Dr. Wm. S. White, of Lexington, Stonewall Jackson's old pastor, and himself a theological student—who commanded one of the companies in the brigade, Will Baylor (as we used familiarly to call him) said t
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 6: hospital work. (search)
er sketch of a soldiers' friend who labored in some of our largest hospitals. She is a character, writes a soldier, a Napoleon of her department; with the firmness and courage of Andrew, she possesses all the energy and independence of Stonewall Jackson. The officials hate her; the soldiers adore her. The former name her The great Eastern, and steer wide of her track; the latter go to her in all their wants and troubles, and know her by the name of Miss sally. She joined the army in you win souls who shall deck the diadem of your Redeemer—who shall be stars to glitter in your crown of rejoicing for ever and ever. At the union prayer-meeting (of all denominations) one afternoon, that gallant soldier and pious man, General Stonewall Jackson, was present, and led in prayer. At the supper-table, some professing Christians, when told of it, expressed regret at not having been present. Had they known that General Fackson was to have been there, they would certainly have gone
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
f Mississippi), was chaplain. There was one also in the Tenth Virginia Infantry, of which Rev. S. S. Lambeth, of the Virginia Methodist Conference, was chaplain. In the Thirteenth Virginia Infantry we had a chapel and parsonage under the same roof, and a well-selected circulating library, which proved a great comfort and blessing to the men. Down on the Rappahannock the next winter there were a still larger number of chapels. I remember especially a large and very comfortable one in the Stonewall Brigade, which General Jackson was accustomed to attend, and where I had the privilege of preaching one Sunday to a deeply attentive congregation, and of watching with great interest the world-famous chief as he played usher until the men were all seated, and then listened with glistening eyes to the old-fashioned Gospel in which he so greatly delighted. But the chapel-building reached its climax along the Rapidan in the winter of 1863-64, and along the Richmond and Petersburg lines in
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 9: State of religion in 1861-62. (search)
nd all were stirred up to their duty by the solemn scenes in which they were called to minister. We had some precious seasons of worship from the day that old Stonewall electrified the Confederacy with his famous dispatch: God blessed our arms with victory at McDowell; all through the Valley campaign; Seven Days around Richmond;mes, and it is needless to add that few such examples have ever told with more wondrous power upon the hearts of men. Are you surprised, after this recital, that Stonewall Jackson is invincible, and that he can lead his army to certain victory whenever God's blessing precedes the act? Rev. G. T. Gray, chaplain of a regiment staElder J. J. Hyman, army chaplain, in a letter to the Christian Index, gives the following account of religious exercises in his regiment (Forty-ninth Georgia, in Stonewall Jackson's command) the second week after the battle at Cedar Run: On the following Monday night, after all became quiet, I opened a meeting, as usual, in o
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 10: revivals in the Lower Valley and around Fredericksburg. (search)
plains in Lawton's Brigade in a very interesting revival. There has also been, under the same efficient labors, an interesting revival in Jackson's old brigade (Stonewall), and in Taliaferro's. A meeting was begun in our brigade (Early's) two weeks ago, and, despite our frequent moves and the bad weather, we are still keeping up tports to the Christian Observer that there are revivals of religion, or a state of promising preparation, amongst others, in the following brigades: Barksdale's, Stonewall, Lawton's, Walker's, Paxton's, Hoke's, Cobb's, Jones's, Posey's, Wilcox's and Kershaw's. The following letter gives a better account of the condition of thinghat their rallying, charging and dying at the very crisis of our fate, at Manassas, contributed not a little towards earning for their brigade its immortal name, Stonewall. While we were singing, one thought frequently came to me: If such meetings were common throughout the army, what a school of sacred music it would be! Surel
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 11: the great revival along the Rapidan. (search)
Ramseur's North Carolina, Doles's Georgia, Scales's North Carolina, Thomas's Georgia, J. M. Jones's Virginia, Battle's Alabama, Kemper's Virginia, Armistead's Virginia, Corse's Virginia, Garnett's Virginia, Hoke's North Carolina, Benning's Georgia, Kershaw's South Carolina, Lane's North Carolina, Daniel's North Carolina, Davis's Mississippi, Kirkland's North Carolina, Semmes's Georgia, Barksdale's Mississippi, Jenkins's South Carolina, Law's Alabama, Anderson's Georgia, Steuart's Virginia, Stonewall (Virginia), Iverson's North Carolina, Cooke's North Carolina, H. H. Walker's Virginia and Tennessee, McGowan's South Carolina, and a number of the artillery battalions and cavalry regiments. This revival work went graciously on, and though the Bristoe campaign, Longstreet's move to the battle of Chickamauga and his East Tennessee campaign, the cold weather which prevented outdoor services, and the very active campaign of 1864, all tended to interrupt the regular services, the interest b
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 12: progress of the work in 1864-65. (search)
myself, I have but one fear. I do not doubt the valor or the patient endurance of the army or the people at home. I only fear that we may trust in an arm of flesh—may look to Lee and Johnston instead of to the Lord of hosts. Our chaplains' meeting on last Tuesday was of more than usual interest, since the report elicited showed a very general revival throughout the army. Extensive revivals were reported in Kirkland's, Davis's, Cooke's, Harris's, Wright's, Perrin's, Scales's, Lane's, Stonewall, J. M. Jones's, Steuart's, Gordon's, Battle's and Daniels's Brigades and portions of the Artillery of both Corps, while in all of the brigades there was a very hopeful state of things. The Lord is evidently with us in these camps, and if we remain here for some days longer, there is every prospect of an even more glorious work than we had last summer and fall. A brother told of a captain in a Georgia regiment who had been a very wicked man, but who, on making a profession of religion, r
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Roster of chaplains, army of Northern Virginia. (search)
w. Thirty-eighth Georgia. J. M. Brittain. Twenty-sixth Georgia. Thirteenth Georgia. Sixtieth Georgia. S. H. Smith. Twelfth Georgia Battalion. Louisiana Brigade (Colonel Peck). Sixth Louisiana. Seventh Louisiana. Father Hubert. Fifth Louisiana. Wm. M. Strickler. Eighth Louisiana. Father Schmilders. Ninth Louisiana. Rev. F. McCarthy. First Louisiana. Father Sheran. Second Louisiana. Robert Hardee. Tenth Louisiana. Fourteenth Louisiana. Fifteenth Louisiana. Terry's Brigade (Stonewall, J. M. Jones' and Steuart's Virginia Brigades). Second Virginia. Rev. Mr. McVeigh; A. C. Hopkins. Fifth Virginia. E. Payson Walton; C. S. M. See. Fourth Virginia. F. C. Tebbs; Wm. R. McNeer. Twenty-seventh Virginia. L. C. Vass. Thirty-third Virginia. J. M. Grandin. Twenty-third Virginia. Paul C. Morton. Tenth Virginia. J. P. Hyde; S. S. Lambeth; Rev. Mr. Balthis. Thirty-seventh Virginia. Forty-fourth Virginia. Richard I. McIlwaine; James Nelson. Twenty-fifth Virginia. Georg