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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 106 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 50 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 44 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 34 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 28 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Stonewall or search for Stonewall in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. His career and character. An address by Hunter McGuire, M. D., Ll.D. This address, as felicitous in its delineation of the character of one of the greatest soldiers of the age as it is acute and comprehensive in its recountal of his achievements, has been several times delivered by its distinguished author before large and representative audiences, first on June 23, 1897, at the dedication of the Jackson Memorial Hall, at Lexington, Va., next before R. E. Lee Camp Confederate Veterans, at Richmond, Va., on July 2d, and since, at other places. It has been enthusiastically received on every occasion. The close official relation of Medical-Director McGuire with General Jackson afforded the best possible advantages for an intimate knowledge of the character of the great leader. The address itself is a striking evidence of the versatility of the genius of one of the foremost surgeons and physicians in this era
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
Jackson threw his force upon the right flank of the enemy, whilst A. P. and D. H. Hill pressed them vigorously at other points. Their breastworks were soon carried, and the enemy fell back one mile to a stronger line of works, from which position A. P. Hill failed to dislodge them. Night came on, but an artillery contest was still maintained until a late hour. Next day at dawn the Confederates renewed the attack, after a bloody conflict of two hours, the enemy, realizing that the mighty Stonewall had got in their rear, abandoned their position, destroying ammunition, &c., and fell back to a yet stronger line of works. In fact they had three lines of battle here, each protected by breastworks extending from a point on the left near Gaines' Mill, to a point on the right beyond Cold Harbor. In the attack on this position, the division of D. H. Hill—to which the 23d belonged—was the first to become engaged. When the battle became general, and the whole of Jackson's and Longstreet's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.37 (search)
General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson. [from the Richmond, Va., times, January 23, 1898.] Incidents in the remarkable career of the great soldier. by General Dabney H. Maury. He made a poor impression when he first arrived at West Point—a second in a Duel—he obeyed orders at great cost. Men will never cease to wonder at the character and history of General Thomas Jonathan Jackson. No other man in history can be likened to him. He has oftener been compared with Oliver Cromwell than with any other great soldier. But Cromwell was a great statesman, who ruled his people with far-reaching wisdom. We have no evidence that Jackson can be likened to Cromwell in this, but would be inclined to pronounce Jackson a warrior, pure and simple, devoid of any great strategic capacity, as he seemed to be of good fellowship, humorous inclinations or any degree of tenderness. Four years of incarceration together at West Point and subsequent service together in the armies of the Unite
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
dder fray, In the lapse of all the years. Garlands still shall wreathe the swords That they drew amid our cheers; Children's lispings, women's words, Sunshine, and the songs of birds Greet them here through all the years. With them ever shall abide All our love and all our prayers. ‘What of them?’ the battle's tide Hath not scathed them. Lo, they ride Still with Stuart down the years. Where are they who went away, Sped with smiles that changed to tears? Lee yet leads the lines of gray- Stonewall still rides down this way; They are Fame's through all the years. Given vote of thanks. Captain Parks was frequently applauded during his speech, and at its close he received quite an ovation. Captain Stratton moved that the thanks of the camp should be extended to the distinguished speaker for his eloquent and patriotic oration, and the motion was seconded, though before it could be put Captain Alex. Archer moved to amend it so as to include the thanks of the entire audience.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.46 (search)
ll for naught. It was their way Where they loved. They died to save What was lost. The fight was brave. That is all; and here are they. III. Is that all? Was duty naught? Love and Faith made blind with tears? What the lessons that they taught? What the glory that they caught From the onward sweeping years? Here are they who marched away, Followed by our hopes and fears; Nobler never went than they To a bloodier, madder fray, In the lapse of all the years. Garlands still shall wreathe the swords That they drew amid our cheers; Children's lispings, women's words, Sunshine, and the songs of birds Greet them here through all the years. With them ever shall abide All our love and all our prayers. ‘What of them?’ The battle's tide Hath not scathed them. Lo, they ride Still with Stuart down the years. Where are they who went away, Sped with smiles that changed to tears? Lee yet leads the lines of gray— Stonewall still rides down this way; They are Fame's through all the y