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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 31: battle of Chickamauga. (search)
ad between the enemy's left and Chattanooga open, which gave him opportunity to interpose or force the enemy from his works to open battle to save his line. But he preferred his plan of direct attack as the armies stood, and opened his battle by attack of the right wing at 9.30 A. M. of the 20th. He was there, and put the corps under Lieutenant-General D. H. Hill to the work. Breckenridge's and Cleburne's divisions, Breckenridge on the right, overreached the enemy's left by two brigades, Stovall's and Adams's, but the other brigade, Helm's, was marched through the wood into front assault of the enemy behind his field-works. This brigade made desperate repeated and gallant battle until the commander, Benjamin H. Helm, one of the most promising brigadiers, was killed, when its aggressive work was suspended. The other brigades crossed the Chattanooga road, changed front, and bore down against the enemy's left. This gave them favorable ground and position. They made resolute at
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
he again charged, coming from the left, and wheeled into and down the road just where my left flank rested upon it. I immediately changed front upon the left regiment, and ordered Colonel Henderson, Forty-Second Georgia, temporarily in charge of Stovall's brigade, upon my right, to face by the rear rank and wheel to the right so as to cover the road. A few well-directed volleys cut the charging column, and part of two regiments continued down the road while the rest fell back into the woods. quitting the trenches. Lieutenant-Colonel Lindsay, while temporarily in command of my brigade, discovered fine qualities as an officer, and Colonel Henderson was conspicuous for his efficiency and bravery while, for a short time, in command of Stovall's brigade, under trying circumstances. I would again commend Captain A. L. Stuart, A. I. G., for his courage, judgment and promptness. I regret to state that he was severely wounded. Captain H. H. Bain, A. A. G., and Captain G. Norton, A. A.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A correction of General Patton Andersons report of the battle of Jonesboro, Ga. (search)
division, in the field. Major: I have the honor to make the following report: This division was moved from East Point on the night of the 30th August, and after an exceedingly fatiguing march, reached Jonesboroa about the middle of the day of the 31st. Here resting about two hours, I received orders from the Lt.-Gen. Commanding to send a brigade to report to General Stevenson, and to move out for battle. I was directed to form my two remaining brigades, Gibson's and Holtzclaw's, (Brig-Gen. Stovall having been sent to report to General Stevenson,) in the second line and on the right of General Manigault's brigade, which was also placed under my command. Between 3 and 4 P. M. the front line moved out of the breastworks to make the attack. Having a considerable quantity of brush-wood to go through and to pass over the breastworks, both of which I knew would create confusion in the line, I ordered that it should halt so soon as it should reach the open field beyond, and gave the
the direction of McLemore's Cove. Breckinridge's division, composed of Adams's, Helm's, and Stovall's brigades, guarded the various roads leading into Lafayette from the southward. On the morninette. Adams's brigade was immediately thrown across the road to oppose the threatened advance, Stovall forming on the left of Adams, with his artillery, commanding a wide extent of open ground in ouhe division formed its line of battle at a right angle with the road, Adams being on the right, Stovall in the centre, and Helm on the left. Advancing for about eight hundred yards through open fielon. Helm, encountering a deadly fire from the intrenchments, was held in check,while Adams and Stovall passed on exposed to a terrible fire of grape and shot from the enemy's front, at the same time parallel to the enemy's lines, whose artillery belched forth a blasting fire. Forward pressed Stovall, Gibson, and Helm, in perfect order, cheered by other lines of troops as they advanced, and pas
back in great disorder. The assaults were made principally in front of Holtzclaus' (Alabama), Gibson's (Louisiana), and Stovall's (Georgia) brigades, of Clayton's Division, and Pettus's Alabama brigade of Stevenson's Division, and too much credit cing to turn our right flank. He made, however, but one feeble effort to use this force, when it was readily repulsed by Stovall's Georgia, and Bradley's Mississippi brigades, which latter had been moved to the right. Smith's Division, of Cheatham'a rout, if possible. Their boldness was soon checked by many of them being killed and captured by Pettus's Alabama, and Stovall's Georgia, brigades, with Bledsoe's battery, under Major General Clayton. Several guidons were captured in one of theirtevenson's rear, and attacked Major General Clayton's Division about dark; but they were handsomely repulsed, Gibson and Stovall's brigades being principally engaged. Some four or five guidons were captured from the enemy during the evening. Abo
er's reserve corps of Abolition troops was moving down upon us, and not a moment was to be lost. At the same time, it was reported that Longstreet was driving the enemy's right flank, which added fresh nerve and vigor to our already exhausted men. The signal being given, the whole line advanced: Breckinridge leading off on the extreme right, the division making a left half-wheel, which brought it parallel to the enemy's lines, whose artillery belched forth a blasting fire. Forward pressed Stovall, Gilson, and Helm, in perfect order, cheered by other lines of troops as they advanced, and passing through the unterrified of Walker's line, who was then engaging the enemy, without halting, and reserving their fire until within a few yards of the foe, when they sprang forward with a wild yell to the charge, receiving a volley from the enemy without effect. A second volley from the barricades of trees and stones checked Breckinridge for a moment, and many a brave, with the noble Helm, fe
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 11 (search)
g as resolutely, and approaching as near to the Confederate line as before, but were a second time repulsed by the firmness of their opponents, and their deliberate fire of canister-shot and musketry. The engagement was continued in this manner almost two hours, when the assailants drew off. In this action a few of the men of Clayton's and Baker's brigades were partially sheltered by a hasty arrangement of some fallen timber which they found near their line. The other brigade engaged, Stovall's, had no such protection. Nothing entitled to the term breastworks had been constructed by the division. We found, next morning, that the Federal line extended much farther to our right than it had done the day before. Polk's corps was transferred to the right of Hood's, therefore, covering the road to Acworth. Consequently, all the ground between Hood's left and the Powder Spring road was guarded by Hardee's corps. There was little activity apparent in either army during the day.
ion in which the importance and splendor of the victory prompts us to indulge. And the death of those noble men causes us to realize our increased obligation to Him who ruleth in the armies of heaven and earth, and to fall down in adoring gratitude, and give the honor of the success to the God whom we serve. His right arm won the victory for our arms, and to Him would we ascribe the glory.--Charleston Courier, July 23. While we rejoice for our success, many homes have the shadow of death round about, and the voice of weeping, the wail of widowhood, the sharp cry of orphanage, are in our land. We have bought our victory dearly, paid for it the purchase-blood of the brave. While we drop a tear for the noble, the manly, the gallant heroic, for our Bartow, and Bee, and Johnson, and Stovall, and the whole long list of glory's children, and while we mourn with their families and friends, let us thus be nerved all the more to strike, strike again.--Atlanta (Ga.) Sentinel, July 23.
alloped off. My revolver had failed me — missed fire. Private Stovall, of the Fiftieth Illinois, dashed out after them. Their horses and mules did, I don't know which. I determined Stovall should not be alone, and let old gray do her best after him. None of the others could keep in sight of the rebels. Stovall and I had the chase to ourselves, he being some twenty yard horse got into the creek, about forty yards in advance of Stovall, he fell, and threw Cooper plump into the water. The horshe saddle turned, and they both fell into the creek, when, Stovall having arrived, he presented his pistol so dangerously tharot, when I turned the prisoners over to him, and followed Stovall, who did not see where the rebel horse-tracks left the patd the rest of our party. Of the four guerrillas we saw, Stovall captured the Colonel (Cooper) and one man — I, another manhave his saddle and bridle as a trophy. I may add that Stovall and my informant (whose pardon I humbly beg for here infor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lieutenant-General S. D. Lee's report of the Tennessee campaign, beginning September 29th, 1864. (search)
iven back in great disorder. The assaults were made principally in front of Holtzclaw's Alabama, Gibson's Louisiana and Stovall's Georgia brigades of Clayton's division, and Pettus' Alabama brigade of Stevenson's division, and too much credit cannoing to turn our right flank. He made, however, but one feeble effort to use this force, when it was readily repulsed by Stovall's Georgia and Brantley's Mississippi brigades, which latter two had been moved to the right. Smith's division of Cheathat a rout if possible. Their boldness was soon checked by many of them being killed and captured by Pettus' Alabama and Stovall's Georgia brigades and Bledsoe's battery under Major-General Clayton. Several guidons were captured in one of their chaevenson's rear and attacked Major-General Clayton's division about dark, but they were handsomely repulsed; Gibson's and Stovall's brigades being principally engaged. Some four or five guidons were captured from the enemy during the evening. Abo
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