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Charles E. Stowe, Harriet Beecher Stowe compiled from her letters and journals by her son Charles Edward Stowe 274 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 34 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 30 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 28 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, John Greenleaf Whittier 13 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Harriet Beecher Stowe or search for Harriet Beecher Stowe in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
of tender mysticism became a dogma of terror. Naturally it roused intense opposition, but this, together with the logical completeness of the system, focussed attention upon it; so that it remained a powerful influence until the time of general emancipation from theological terrors. Hopkins personally met his own requirements of benevolence. His combination of terrific doctrine with a kindly and self denying personal life among his Newport parishioners is the underlying theme of Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel, The minister's Wooing. The romance indicated by the title was suggested in part by an incident of Hopkins's ministry at Great Barrington. His philanthropic opposition to the slave trade, said to be the first open opposition by an American clergyman, rendered him so unpopular among the prosperous traders of Newport that he was left to die in poverty with the feeling that his work was unaccomplished. Futile, he must have felt, was his letter of remonstrance and admonition
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
is in the attempt to portray negro character were William Gilmore Simms, See also Book II, Chap. VII. Edgar Allan Poe, See also Book II, Chap. XIV. Harriet Beecher Stowe, See also Book III, Chap. XI. Stephen Collins Foster, and Irwin Russell. Hector, the negro slave in Simms's Yemassee (1835), and Jupiter in Poe's Goldse, the scenes in the book are so skilfully arranged to excite public indignation, that one can hardly call it a great work of art or even a work of art at all. Mrs. Stowe knew the negro chiefly as she had seen him on the right bank of the Ohio River. Ohio was a free state and the negroes that Mrs. Stowe talked with in CincinnatiMrs. Stowe talked with in Cincinnati were those that had fled from Kentucky. Uncle Tom is the type of a good man, a man of sterling piety, subjected to bitter servitude and maltreatment; but there is little about him that is distinctively negro. There is no African background. The language that he speaks is a low grade of highly evangelized English but no more dis
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
lf. One cannot forget them. A transition from another source is to be found in the stories of Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909), who also stands on the border line between the real and the romantic. She was affected not at all by Harte, but by Mrs. Stowe and Rose Terry Cooke. In her Deephaven (1877) she struck the new note of the decade, concreteness, geographical locality made so definite and so minutely real that it may be reckoned with as one of the characters in the story. Rose Terry Cooke had written of New England; Miss Jewett wrote of Deephaven, which was Berwick, Maine, her native town. Mrs. Stowe and Mrs. Cooke wrote of the New England flood tide; Miss Jewett wrote of the ebb, not despairingly like Miss Wilkins and the depressed realists, but reverently and gently. Over all her work is the hint of a glory departed, that Irving-like atmosphere which is the soul of romance. She delighted in decaying old seaports with their legends of other and better days, of old sea capta
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
e the Mast, which like that of Robinson Crusoe so commended it to boys, is found in the fact that quotations from it long formed the material upon oculists' cards for testing the eyesight. wrote directly for them. Nor (except occasionally) did Mrs. Stowe, See also Book III, Chap. XI. whose Uncle Tom's cabin is now almost exclusively a juvenile. The one author of general fame who did so was Hawthorne. See also Book II, Chap. XI. His Grandfather's chair, Wonder Book, and Tanglewood talesimplicity need not be inane, and that to entertain children without enfeebling their intellect or stultifying their sentiment afforded scope for mature skill and judgment. Our young Folks, published by Ticknor and Fields (about 1865), enlisted Mrs. Stowe, Whittier, Higginson, Aldrich, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps, E. E. Hale, Rose Terry Cook, Bayard Taylor. It was edited by J. T. Trowbridge, Gail Hamilton, and Lucy Larcom; and later was merged into St. Nicholas, edited by Mrs. Mary Mapes Dodge (18
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
2 Sterne, 103 Stewart, Dugald, 197 Stevenson, B. E., 304 Stevenson, R. L., 6, 9, 10, 15, 230, 240 Stiles, Rev., Ezra, 198, 200, 201 n., 205, 206 Stockton, F. R., 374, 385-386, 388, 407 Stoddard, R. H., 167, 276, 281, 286 Stonewall Jackson's grave, 307 Stonewall Jackson's way, 298, 299, 304, 307 Stories mother nature told, 405 Stories of Georgia, 348 n. Stories revived, 387 Story, Joseph, 71, 72, 76-78, 118 Story, W. W., 276 Story of a bad boy, 405 Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 199, 211, 214, 351, 352, 382, 401 Stranger in Lowell, the, 52 Strauss, 209 Stuart, Moses, 208, 209, 211 Such is the death the soldier dies, 331 Sumner, Charles, 51, 143, 144, 319 Sun (N. Y.), 186, 187, 357 n. Sunday, 5 Sunrise, 343 Supernaturalism of New England, the, 52 Susan Coolidge. See Woolsey, Sarah Sut Lovengood. See Harris, G. W. Surrender at Appomattox, the, 279, 285 Swamp Fox, the, 306 Swift, 5, 102, 203 Swinburne, 51, 245, 271,