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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Records of Longstreet's corps, A. N. V. (search)
irection and fell into their hands; and after the charge, Lieutenant-Colonel Marye, and a number of men and officers of the Seventeenth in returning, as they thought to their original position, walked directly upon this brigade and were captured. Strange to say beyond making these captures, it took no part in the action, and its position was never known or suspected by the Confederates. Meanwhile, about the time that Kemper had penetrated the enemy's lines, Pickett's brigade, under Colonel Strange, and Branch's brigade of A. P. Hill's division were hurried forward to his support. The difficulties of the forest, however, prevented their arrival in time to take advantage of his success, and after passing the fragments of this brigade in retreat, Branch and Strange (the latter on the right) became engaged within the wood with the pursuing enemy, and drove him back into the field. On the edge of this field Branch halted, where a projection of the wood placed him within range of the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
rallel line on the north side of the river, and after the former had been struggling nearly two hours with his foe, the latter opened upon Marmaduke a heavy enfilading fire from across the stream. Hard pressed in front and flank, the Confederates fell slowly back toward the city, where columns of black smoke indicated the evacuation of the place. Seeing this, Davidson ordered a vigorous advance by Glover's brigade, and then a charge by Ritter's brigade (which had been held in reserve) and Strange's battery, supported by a part of the First Iowa Cavalry. This was done with the most abundant success. The Confederates broke, and fled through the city, closely followed by the Union cavalry, sabers in hand. At seven o'clock that evening, Sept. 10. when Steele and his immediate followers were occupying the Confederate works on the north side of the river, opposite Little Rock, the city and its military appurtenances were formally surrendered to Davidson by the civil authorities. The
gerly expecting their advance. But they appear to have been aware that their victory was a lucky accident, and they did not choose to submit its prestige to the chances of another fray. Having gratified their thirst for knowledge, considerably out of musket-shot, they returned to their previous hiding-places in the woods skirting Bull Run. Beauregard, in his official report, thus lamely explains this modesty: Early's brigade, meanwhile, joined by the 19th Virginia regiment, Lieut. Col. Strange, of Cocke's brigade, pursued the now panic-stricken, fugitive enemy. Stuart, with his cavalry, and Beckham, had also taken up the pursuit along the road by which the enemy had come upon the field that morning; but, soon encumbered by prisoners, who thronged his way, the former was unable to attack the mass of the fast-fleeing, frantic Federalists. Withers's, R. J. Preston's, Cash's, and Kershaw's regiments, Hampton's Legion and Kemper's battery, also pursued along the Warrenton road
th two 6-pounder brass guns of Walton's battery. Bonham's brigade held the approaches to Mitchell's Ford; it was composed of Kershaw's 2d, Williams' 3d, Bacon's 7th and Cash's 8th regiments South Carolina volunteers; of Shields' and Del Kemper's batteries, and of Flood's, Radford's, Payne's, Ball's, Wickman's and Powell's companies of Virginia cavalry, under Col. Radford. Cocke's brigade held the Fords below and in vicinity of the Stone Bridge, and consisted of Wither's 18th, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange's 19th, and R. T. Preston's 28th regiments, with Latham's battery and one company of cavalry, Virginia volunteers. Evans held my left flank and protected the Stone Bridge crossing, with Sloane's 4th regiment South Carolina volunteers, Wheat's Special Battalion Louisiana volunteers, four 6-pounder guns and two companies of Virginia cavalry. Early's brigade, consisting of Kemper's 7th, Early's 24th regiment of Virginia volunteers, Hays' 7th regiment Louisiana volunteers, and th
stantly responded, and was placed under command of Major Atkinson, of the Fiftieth Indiana, and recaptured the train, taking several prisoners, among whom were Major Strange, General Forrest's Adjutant-General; Colonel McKee, his aid, and one or two other officers. This was scarcely accomplished, when I learned that you had arrivelt, but ran for cover of the adjacent forest as fast as their horses could carry them. Forrest himself was one of the first to follow this example. His Adjutant-General Strange was not so fortunate, and became a prisoner. So quickly was the fight ended by their appearance upon the scene, that there was hardly any thing done on was fully one thousand. Among the killed were Colonel Nappier, a Lieutenant-Colonel and a Major, names not learned. Among the prisoners were Forrest's Adjutant-General Strange, Colonel McKee, an aid of Forrest's, Colonel Cox of the Tennessee militia, Major Lee, and fifteen other line and commissioned officers. We also captured
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
re the Confederates while crossing the Hatchie river at Bolivar. Forrest reached Bolivar first, and posting his three hundred chosen veterans in the fortifications, well constructed by the Federals when they held this place, he coolly received the attack of not less than two thousand cavalry, repulsed them with serious loss, and they retired evidently believing Forrest's whole command present. He then moved on, having suffered no serious loss, save the wounding of his gallant Adjutant, Major Strange. Hurlbut was severely censured, removed from his command at Memphis, and General C. C. Washburn put in his place. When, a short time after this, Forrest came into Memphis and captured Washburn's uniform from the room in which he slept, it is said that Hurlbut curtly remarked: They removed me because I couldn't keep Forrest out of West Tennessee, but Washburn couldn't keep him out of his bedroom. The defeat of Sturgis. Forrest reached Tupelo, Mississippi, on the 5th of May, 1864,
lle soon after the occupation of Fernandina by the Federal forces about the 12th of March, on the night of the 24th Lieutenant Strange of Company H, and C. H. Ross and Frank Ross of Company 1, Third Florida regiment, with ten volunteers, attacked the Federal picket at the Brick Church, killing four and capturing three. In this skirmish Lieutenant Strange was mortally wounded. Soon after this event the Fourth Florida was ordered to Corinth, Miss. While these organizations of infantry were bet to reconnoiter, who reported that a strong picket-guard was stationed at the Brick church. A small command under Lieutenant Strange of the Third Florida was ordered to capture the guard, if possible without bloodshed. Thus began the first encountugh about half our number, wounded several of our men before they gave up the post. It was in this engagement that Lieutenant Strange was mortally wounded. Soon after the enemy retired to the gunboats and Jacksonville was evacuated. It would have
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ation. We are not yet able to announce fully the programme, (which is in the hands of a local committee, of which General John F. Wheless is chairman,) but may say that we have every prospect of a large and interesting meeting, We have already the promise of the following papers: I. The Battle of Franklin. Discussed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ation. We are not yet able to announce fully the programme, (which is in the hands of a local committee, of which General John F. Wheless is chairman,) but may say that we have every prospect of a large and interesting meeting, We have already the promise of the following papers: I. The Battle of Franklin. Discussed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. M
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
r again. Upon getting my battery over the river, I put my guns in position along the old line as I thought best, and awaited ulterior orders from headquarters. My only support were the feeble remains of a company of so-called cavalry under Captain Strange. In all the twenty men of his command there was not a single man or officer decently mounted. With my old fiery Bucephalus, Duncan, I could have charged and overturned every skeleton of a horse in his company. But the men were all true tar-heels, and there was no braver man than Captain Strange. On the afternoon of the 10th the artillery was ordered back on the south side, and preparations made to leave Weldon. According to Captain Webb, there were then at that point about five hundred men, including at least seventy-five stragglers, furloughed men, convalescents from the hospitals, and detailed men. On the 12th the command to leave Weldon was given. Captain Webb was ordered to take charge of the column and start towards
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