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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 61 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1864., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for A. D. Streight or search for A. D. Streight in all documents.

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Vaught's Hill Gordon Granger repulses Van Dorn at Franklin Col. A. D. Streight raids into Northern Georgia is overpowered and captured neand mules, and destroying a large amount of camp equipage. Col. A. D. Streight, 51st Indiana, at the head of 1,800 cavalry, was next dispath Alabama, returning ultimately to his headquarters at Corinth, Col. Streight struck for Northern Georgia, expecting to swoop down successive when, his ammunition being exhausted and his men nearly worn out, Streight surrendered, when 15 miles from Rome. His men were treated as other captives and exchanged; while Streight and his officers were retained for a time in close prison, on a demand of Gov. Brown, of Georgia, this employer's sword, as an act of duty. After a long confinement, Streight, will 107 other of our officers, escaped Feb. 9, 1864. from Libby Prison, Richmond: 60 of them, including Streight, making their way to our lines. He estimates his loss in killed and wounded during this r
osed in on Wood's left flank ; while Smith came in on Wood's right; Schofield, facing eastward, threatened the enemy's left flank ; and Wilson, still farther to the right, and more advanced, gained the Rebel rear — reaching across the Granny White pike, and threatening to cut them off from any line of retreat on Franklin. And now, while this movement against his, rear was prosecuted, our entire front advanced till within 600 yards of the enemy; and, at 3 P. M., Post's brigade, supported by Streight's, was directed by Wood to assault Overton's hill in front; while Col. Morgan's Black brigade was impelled by Steedman against it farther to our left. The assault was duly made; but the enemy had seen all the preparations for it, had concentrated accordingly, and now received it with such a storm of grape, canister, and musketry, as our men charged over abatis up the hill, that they were driven back, terribly cut up--Col. Post being among the wounded. But the survivors were promptly ref
ries, 298. Quinby's division, at Champion Hills, 308; at Vicksburg, 312. R. Raccoon Ford, Va., Rebels crossing at, 175. raids, of J. E. B. Stuart, around McClellan's army, 150; into Pennsylvania, 211; of Carter and Wheeler, 283; of Streight and Dodge in Georgia, 285; of Stoneman, in Virginia, 365; of Forrest and John Morgan, 270; of Grierson, 301-2; of Green, 338; of Stuart across the Rappahannock, 352; of Morgan into Indiana and Ohio, 405; of Wheeler into East Tennessee, 433; of Ses Salisbury, N. C., 689; destroys railroad, 751. Stone river, or Murfreesboroa, battle of, 273-9. Stone's battery, at Perryville, 219. Strahl, Gen., killed at Franklin, Tenn., 683. Strange, Col. J. B., on battle of Glendale, 163. Streight, Col. A. D., 51st Ind., raids into Georgia, 285; captured in the fight at Nashville, 685. strong, Gen., established on Morris Island, 475; assaults Fort Wagner and is killed, 477. Stuart, Gen. David, at Pittsburg Landing, 53; at Yazoo Bluf