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The Daily Dispatch: September 14, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 5 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 6 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Stringham or search for Stringham in all documents.

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five of her crew. The residue, thirty-six in number, were sent to Fort Mifflin, on the Delaware, as prisoners. Gen. Benj. F. Butler sailed, August 26, 1861, from Fortress Monroe, as commander of a military and naval force whose destination was secret. It consisted of the fifty-gun frigates Minnesota, Wabash, and Cumberland, with four smaller national vessels and two steam transports, carrying 800 soldiers, with two tugs laden with supplies; the Naval force under the command of Corn. Stringham. Arriving the second night off the entrance through Hatteras Inlet to Pamlico Sound, it was found defended Hatteras. Explanations to the plan of the Bombardment of Forts Hatteras and Clark. A. United States troops and marines. B. Masked Batteries. C. Scouting parties awaiting the bombardment D. Small Boats. 1. Cumberland. 2. Wabash. 3. Minnesota. 4 and 5. Susquehanna and Monticello, during the afternoon of the bombardment. 6, 7, and 8. Steamers Pawnee, Harriet Lan
s not in. elude Gen. Wool's command at and near Fortress Monroe. On the 1st of January following, he makes his total 219,707; on the 1st of February, 222,196. strong, and able to advance on the enemy with not less than 150,000 sabers and bayonets, eagerly awaited the long-expected permission to prove itself but fairly represented in that casual detachment which had fought and won at Dranesville. In every other quarter, our arms were in the ascendant. The blow well struck by Butler and Stringham at Hatteras, had never been retaliated. The Rebels' attempt to cut off Brown's regiment at Chicamicomico had resulted in more loss to them than to us. Du Pont's triumph at Port Royal had dealt a damaging blow to our foes, and inflicted signal injury on the original plotters of treason, without loss to our side. In West Virginia, the campaign was closing with the prestige of success and superiority gilding our standards, and with at least nine-tenths of the whole region securely in our ha
130; extract from, 131; removed to Alton, 134; comments from. 186; its press destroyed, 137; the editor slain, etc., 141. St. Louis Republican, The, citation from, 131; stigmatizes The Observer, 136. Storrs, Henry R., vote on Mo. Compromise, 80. Stone, Gen. Chas. P., McClellan's order to, 620-21; 621; 622; his orders to Col. Baker, 624. Stout, Mr., of Oregon, tenders a minority report in the Committee of Thirty-three, 387. Stringfellow, Gen., a Border Ruffian, 243; 283. Stringham, Com. S. H., 599; 627. Stuart, A. H. H., of Va., a Commissioner to President Lincoln, 452; his letter to The Staunton Spectator, 478; allusion to, 509. Stuart, Lieut.-Col., (Rebel,) at Bull Run, 543-4. Stuart, Gen. J. E. B., at Dranesville, 626. Sturgis, Major, 579;: in the battle of Wilson's Creek, 590 to 582; tries to reinforce Mulligan, 487. Sumner, Charles, 229; 231; assault on, 299. Sumter, the privateer, escapes out of the Mississippi; is blockaded at Gibraltar, 602