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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 6 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 14 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Silas H. Stringham or search for Silas H. Stringham in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. Determination of Lincoln to regain possee Hatteras Inlet. vessels composing the squadron and their commanders. Commodore Stringham. the squadron leaves Hampton Roads. the squadron anchors at Hatteras I forts Hatteras and Clark. the garrison surrender to General Butler and Commodore Stringham. effect of the capture of forts Hatteras and Clark on the Confederates. of capturing the defences of Hatteras Inlet a squadron under command of Commodore Stringham was fitted out. It consisted of the Minnesota, Captain Van Brunt, Wabashve been finished in six hours required twenty-four to accomplish. Commodore Silas H. Stringham, U. S. N. (afterwards Rear Admiral.) In our opinion had all the deavoring to reach the forts. At 2:30 P. M. General Butler went on board Com. Stringham's flagship, taking with him Flag Officer Samuel Barron, C. S. N., commandin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
cement of the Mississippi squadron. Captain A. H. Foote ordered to command the Western flotilla. James B. Eads. Commodore Stringham relieved. commands given to flag officers Dupont and McKean. the Port Royal expedition fitted out. assembling ody encounter, from Fort Henry to Grand Gulf, Port Hudson and the Red River. After the capture of Fort Hatteras, Commodore Stringham was relieved of the command at his own request. Two squadrons were organized on the Atlantic coast, one to guard d effect against earthworks, but those works were small affairs in comparison with the defences of Port Royal, and Commodore Stringham's force was comparatively much more powerful than that of Dupont, to say nothing of a clear sea in which StringhamStringham had plenty of room to perform his elliptical movements. The forts at Hatteras had inflicted little injury on the Union ships, but here it looked as if the case would be different, and that our squadron would have as much as it could attend to.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
seen. The President inquired if there was at that time any officer of high rank in Washington who would sustain Mr. Fox in his project, directing that if one could be found he should be brought to the executive mansion. Mr. Fox took Commodore Stringham to the President, who that morning had held a long conference with Commodore Stewart, and both declared that Sumter could be relieved on the plan Mr. Fox proposed. On the 10th of March the President sent Mr. Fox to New York to make inqulay half a day was lost. The recruits that he finally furnished were entirely unfit to be thrown into a fort likely to be attacked by the Confederates. Mr. Fox had applied to the Secretary of the Navy before leaving Washington, to have Commodore Stringham take command of the expedition; but that officer declined, as he considered it too late to be successful and likely to ruin the reputation of the officer who undertook it! The hiring of three tugs was intrusted to Russell Sturgis, who o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
dition of the Navy Department at the breaking out of the rebellion. Secretary Welles, his character and ability. Commodores Stringham and Paulding connected with the Navy Department to assist Secretary Welles. Paulding drives the secessionists outkind of men it was desirable to have about him under the circumstances, and he called to his aid in the department Commodore Stringham, the best dock-yard officer in the Navy and a thorough seaman, loyal to the last degree and of a most honorable chfederates that it would break up any further attempt to fortify the Southern coast! Commodore Paulding relieved Commodore Stringham in the Navy Department. He was a faithful officer, who looked upon the flag of his country as the emblem of all tdid not care to shoulder. In fact, Commodore Paulding disliked the atmosphere of the Navy Department as much as Commodore Stringham had done, and soon obtained duty at the New York Navy Yard, where he thought he could be of more service to his co