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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 6 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 15 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 14 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 9 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Silas H. Stringham or search for Silas H. Stringham in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 4 document sections:

ction with the fleet, under command of Flag Officer Stringham, against the rebel forts at Hatteras I. Respectfully, your obedient servant, S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer Atlantic Blockading Squadro. Respectfully, your obedient servant, S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer Atlantic Blockading Squadro the United States the eighty-fifth year. S. H. Stringham, Flag-Officer Atlantic Blockading Squadro, Respectfully, your obedient servant, S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer Atlantic Blockading Squadro I beg to refer to the reports of Flag-officer Silas H. Stringham and Major-General B. F. Butler. d to this steamer by the order of Flag-officer Silas H. Stringham. The two remaining men were fount, North Carolina, under the command of Commodore Stringham and Maj.-Gen. Butler. The result of th your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Com. S. H. Stringham. Secession reports. Major Andreon August 29, 1861, I surrendered to Commodore S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer, and Major-General Ben
Secession reports. Major Andrews' report. on board United States ship Minnesota, September 1, 1861. To the Adjutant-General of North Carolina: sir: I beg leave to report that after a bombardment of three hours and twenty minutes, on August 29, 1861, I surrendered to Commodore S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer, and Major-General Benjamin F. Butler, Commanding United States forces, Fort Hatteras, at Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina. In making this report, I desire briefly to relate the circumstances attending the capitulation. I arrived at Fort Hatteras on the evening of the 28th of August in company with Commodore Barron, Flag-officer C. S. navy, in charge of the defences of Virginia and North Carolina, and found that during the day the enemy had attacked the forces under the command of Colonel William F. Martin, as well as Forts Clark and Hatteras, under my command, and after a day of most severe and unceasing fighting, the colonel had succeeded in concentrating all the f
grant you; but ideas are universal, not sectional. It is American only in the sense that our liberty is American, embracing within the ample folds of its character, of its promise, of its hopes, all those who, residing with us and denizened among us, are faithful to our cause; and I cannot now fail to call to your recollection that in the recent brilliant exploit of our naval and our military arm off the coast of North Carolina, where a citizen of New York, the venerable and gallant Commodore Stringham, (loud applause,) united his well-earned laurels with those that garlanded the younger brow of a Massachusetts General, Butler. (Applause, and three cheers for Butler.) When would it be possible for me to forget that among the heroes on that day there were none more deserving of their country's honor, and of proud mention on the brightest page of our history, than the colonel and men of the Twentieth New York regiment of Volunteers under the command of an adopted citizen from the Ger
of two taken off in the steamboat Albemarle on Sunday. The destruction of the guns was with me a necessity. I had no means of transporting them or of defending them in their position. I therefore hope my course will meet your approval. I enclose a copy of Lieutenant Maxwell's report, giving all the details of this important service, which was performed without an accident of any kind. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. C. Rowan, Commander. Flag-officer S. H. Stringham, Commanding Atlantic Squadron. Lieutenant Maxwell's report. United States steamer Pawnee, Hatteras Inlet, Sept. 18. sir: I have to report that, in compliance with your orders of the 16th, I started for Ocracoke on that day, in the steamer Fanny, towing the Pawnee's launch. Lieutenant Eastman had charge of the latter, with twenty-two men and six marines from the ship, and the twelve-pound howitzer, and I had on board six men and sixty-one soldiers of the Naval Brigade,