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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Will A. Strong or search for Will A. Strong in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
to the ramparts in time to repel the onslaught. As it was, the result was long doubtful. A part of the enemy's column effected a lodgment in the salient on the left, and not until reinforcements were sent down from James Island to the assistance of the garrison, were these assailants finally overpowered and the entire fort once more in the hands of the Confederates. The attack was bloody and disastrous to the attacking force. Its leader, General Seymour, was dangerously wounded and General Strong with many of his best officers, and hundreds of the men, were killed, while the total loss in killed, wounded and prisoners, has been variously estimated at from 1,500 to 2,200 men. Nearly all of the enemy's regiments were in a statements were in a state of disorganization, and gloom and dismay settled upon them. In this connection it will be of interest to state that, during the siege, the Federal signal book was in our possession, having been captured on the person of a signal offic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
to the ramparts in time to repel the onslaught. As it was, the result was long doubtful. A part of the enemy's column effected a lodgment in the salient on the left, and not until reinforcements were sent down from James Island to the assistance of the garrison, were these assailants finally overpowered and the entire fort once more in the hands of the Confederates. The attack was bloody and disastrous to the attacking force. Its leader, General Seymour, was dangerously wounded and General Strong with many of his best officers, and hundreds of the men, were killed, while the total loss in killed, wounded and prisoners, has been variously estimated at from 1,500 to 2,200 men. Nearly all of the enemy's regiments were in a statements were in a state of disorganization, and gloom and dismay settled upon them. In this connection it will be of interest to state that, during the siege, the Federal signal book was in our possession, having been captured on the person of a signal offic
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
five hundred dollars ($2,500) out of the revenues of the year of 1884, out of any moneys in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to be paid on the warrant of the President of said Board of Directors. Be it further enacted, etc., That this Act shall take effect from and after its passage. R. N. Ogden, Speaker of the House of Representatives. Geo. L. Walton, President pro tern of the Senate. Approved June 30, 1882. S. D. McENERY, Governor of the State of Louisiana. A true copy: will A. Strong, Secretary of State. The Board of Directors as at present constituted are: Army of Northern Virginia—Francis T. Nichols, President; John H. Murray, Louis Prados, John J. Fitzpatrick, John W. T. Leech. Treasurer, John H. Murray. Army of Tennessee—J. A. Chalaron, John Augustin, A. J. Lewis, W. H. Rogers, R. Lambert. A. J. Lewis, Secretary. We need scarcely add that under such management the success of the Home is already an assured fact. All honor to our Louisiana Confederates!