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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
ty, Va., about 1738, Archibald Stuart, Sr., acquired large landed estates, which he divided between his four children. His second son, and third child, Major Alexander Stuart, was, early in the Revolutionary War, commissioned major of the regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel McDowell; and, during Colonel McDowell's illness, comently exchanged, and his sword was returned to him. This valued relic is now in the possession of his grandson, the Hon. Alexander H. H. Stuart, of Va. Judge Alexander Stuart, the youngest son of Major Alexander Stuart, was a lawyer by profession, and resided at various times in Virginia, in Illinois, and in Missouri. He held Major Alexander Stuart, was a lawyer by profession, and resided at various times in Virginia, in Illinois, and in Missouri. He held many honorable and responsible offices in each of these states. He died and was buried in Staunton, Va. His eldest son, the Hon. Archibald Stuart, of Patrick, the father of our general, was an officer in the war of 1812. He embraced the profession of law, and throughout his long and eventful life was actively engaged in the prac
ne county, Va., August 15, 1888. Major-General James Ewell Brown Stuart Major-General James Ewell Brown Stuart, chief of cavalry of the army of Northern Virginia, was born in Patrick county, Va., February 6, 1833. His ancestry in America began with Archibald Stuart, who sought refuge from religious persecution in western Pennsylvania in 1726, and subsequently removed with his family to Augusta county, Va., about 1738. The next generation was distinguished by the services of Maj. Alexander Stuart, who fell dangerously wounded while commanding his regiment at Guilford Court House. John Alexander, son of the latter, spent part of his life in the West, serving as Federal judge in Illinois and Missouri, and as speaker of the house in the latter State. His son, Archibald Stuart, lawyer, soldier of 1812, representative in Virginia legislatures and conventions, married a descendant of the distinguished Letcher family, and their son became the brilliant Virginia cavalry leader. Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Valuable war relic. (search)
orth Carolina. The roll of the company. The following is a complete roll of Company D, Twelfth Battalion Light Artillery, Major Frank J. Boggs, commanding, alluded to in the above letter: Captain, Lewis H. Webb. First Lieutenant, Malcolm D. McNeal. Junior First Lieutenant, Henry R. Home. Third Lieutenant, Archibald McNeal. Sergeant Major, Malcolm McMillan, Richmond county, North Carolina. Quartermaster-Sergeant, John A. McAlpine, Richmond, Virginia. Sergeants. First, Alexander Stuart, Richmond, N. C. Second, William Long, Richmond, N. C. Third, John T. Gibson, Wilmington, N. C. Fourth, James W. Home, Richmond, Virginia. Corporals. First, John W. Snead, Richmond county, N. C. Second, W. W. Dankins, Wilmington, N. C. Third, Alexander McIntyre, Wilmington, N. C. Fourth, A. G. McKithan, Wilmington, N. C. Fifth, D. M. McNeil, Jr., Richmond county, N. C. Sixth, Maltia Hoge, Richmond county, N. C. Artificer, H. W. Gibson, Wilmington, N. C.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
ed that Hill was just where he should have been to observe the movements of Meade's army and to guard the passes through the mountains. Longstreet at Chambersburg, midway between the two wings, was in easy supporting distance of either of them. Stuart, with his three brigades of cavalry, would have rejoined the army on July 1st, for on the morning of that day he reached Dover and in the afternoon Carlisle. It must have been, however, with great reluctance that General Lee would adopt a line of action predicated upon Stuart, for it might be for aught he knew that he had met with a disaster, or been driven back into Virginia. Because General Lee preferred to operate with his army in Pennsylvania until compelled to accept defensive battle with the Army of the Potomac, it by no means follows that an aggressive battle, in which he attacked the enemy as they were assembling, must be unsuccessful, or even that the conditions were necessarily favorable to the enemy. The results of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
kill and moral courage, and calculated on it, and this so nicely that he was able to pass between them without a moment to spare. Indeed, he held these hosts apart with his skirmishers while his main army passed through, each commander of the Federal army in doubt and dread whether the mighty and mysterous Jackson intended one of his overwhelming blows for him. Both, doubtless, hoping the other one would catch it. Certainly they acted in a way to indicate this. With the help of Ashby and Stuart he always knew the location and strength of his enemy. He knew the fighting quality of the enemy's forces too. Let the Yankees get very close, he said to Ewell at Cross Keys, before your infantry fires, they won't stand long. I asked him at Cedar Run if he expected a battle that day. He smiled and said: Banks is in our front and he is generally willing to fight, and, he added very slowly, as if to himself, and he generally gets whipped. At Malvern Hill, when a portion of our army was be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
ather's overcoat. The Brandy Station fight. At Brandy Station the 9th of June, 1863, did Colonel Young recapture Stuart's headquarters and check the triumphant advance of Pleasanton, who had driven back all our cavalry until they met the Cobt, Records of War of the Rebellion, Vol. XXII, p. 732.) As Major Heros Von Borke, the celebrated Prussian officer on General Stuart's staff, said to General Stuart in my presence: Young's regiment made the grandest charge I see on either continent, General Stuart in my presence: Young's regiment made the grandest charge I see on either continent, and Brandy Station is considered the greatest cavalry battle of the war. Wounded again while attempting to lead two regiments of infantry in the charge, which had been sent to reinforce him, he being in command of Hampton's brigade, August 1, 1863us at Heyward's Farm, soon after the evacuation. He was without a peer as a cavalry officer from Georgia, and was one of Stuart's as well as Hampton's, most trusted lieutenants. That the choice should have fallen upon him, demonstrates what the War
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.17 (search)
r, John N. Stoner, D. H. Stoner, William M. Sale, Robert Sale, Samuel W. Short, John Sheridan, John N. Snider, James H. Snider, Thomas Sensabaugh, James Smiley, Andrew Smiley, Robert Sterrett, Daniel Swisher, James Swisher, Wm. W. Smallwood, Alexander Stuart, S. W. Stuart, J. G. Stuart, William M. Sterrett, Samuel W. Sterrett, H. L. Terrill, James Terrill, F. H. Templeton, Arch. Taylor, William Taylor, Howard H. Thompson, John F. Tribbett, William Vines, A. H. Weir, William N. Wilson, Thomas M. Hunter's command near Lexington, while a prisoner, in 1864. Died During War—Samuel B. Anderson, Jacob H. Anderson, Robert Anderson, Charles B. Buchanan, Z. J. Colton, William B. Firebaugh, Henry Firebaugh, Joseph Kinnear, Robert Sterret, Alexander Stuart. The following died in prison: H. W. Patterson, Cyrus Patterson, John Henry Mackey, Gideon Marks, William Brownlee, William Black. Wesley Paxton was drowned in the Kanawha river in 1862. The 14th Virginia Regiment was in Jenkins', aft
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
kskin gloves, with the name of T. J. Jackson inside the cuffs. Hill had intended an attack on the enemy as soon as he had formed his line in front, but soon after Jackson was wounded he himself was wounded, and the attack was not made. Major General Stuart was now in command of the corps. About dawn Sunday morning, May 3, General Stuart renewed the attack, General Heth in command of Hill's division taking the advance. The enemy were again charged in the face of their deadly fire, and twiceGeneral Stuart renewed the attack, General Heth in command of Hill's division taking the advance. The enemy were again charged in the face of their deadly fire, and twice were their works taken and twice relinquished. About ten o'clock the Federal army was driven by a mighty charge from all the fortified positions, back towards the Rappahannock, with heavy loss in killed, wounded and prisoners. On account of the nature of the country, this region being known as the wilderness, rapid pursuit was almost impossible. In the charge the troops were scattered, and after being gotten together, the command maintained its position Sunday and Monday, and on Tuesday eve
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
r duty the same day at Norfolk. At the expiration of its term of enlistment (twelve months) the company was reorganized for the war with largely increased numbers- W. N. Blow, Captain—at Currituck Courthouse, N. C., where it was then stationed. At the evacuation of Norfolk this company brought up the rear of General Huger's command, and was the last company to march out of Norfolk, as it had been the first to march in. At the organization of the Confederate States Cavalry under Major-General Stuart, June, 1862, this company was assigned as Company M to the First Virginia Cavalry, Colonel Fitz Lee commanding, and was soon after transferred to the Fifth Regiment, Colonel Rosser commanding. After the battle of Malvern Hill this company was ordered to Petersburg, and there became Company H, Thirteenth Virginia Cavalry, as part of this newly organized regiment under Colonel Chambliss. The regiment was made up of two companies from Petersburg and two from each of the neighboring cou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.42 (search)
d sweeping years? Here are they who marched away, Followed by our hopes and fears; Nobler never went than they To a bloodier, madder fray, In the lapse of all the years. Garlands still shall wreathe the swords That they drew amid our cheers; Children's lispings, women's words, Sunshine, and the songs of birds Greet them here through all the years. With them ever shall abide All our love and all our prayers. ‘What of them?’ the battle's tide Hath not scathed them. Lo, they ride Still with Stuart down the years. Where are they who went away, Sped with smiles that changed to tears? Lee yet leads the lines of gray- Stonewall still rides down this way; They are Fame's through all the years. Given vote of thanks. Captain Parks was frequently applauded during his speech, and at its close he received quite an ovation. Captain Stratton moved that the thanks of the camp should be extended to the distinguished speaker for his eloquent and patriotic oration, and the motion was second
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