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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 9 7 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 8: (search)
nd laughs without ceasing at everything and everybody. Loving admiration to a fault, she is something of a coquette, though her better qualities, her talents, her good-nature and wit, keep both under some restraint. She always sits in a corner of the salon, and keeps her little court to herself, for she chooses to have an exclusive empire; but this is soon to be over, for she is to be married directly to Count Posse, a Swede. Christine Bonaparte married Count Posse, and afterwards Lord Dudley Stuart, being neither happy nor respectable in either connection. Count Posse travelled in this country about 1827 or 1828, and when visiting at my house showed us some very beautiful and curious miniatures and jewels. I did not know, till some time after, that he was so pressed for money that no doubt he would have gladly sold them. He borrowed money of Mr. Cogswell, which he did not repay. A younger daughter of Mad. Bonaparte came from the convent, where she had been educated, when she
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
t Church, besides our host and his handsome, agreeable wife, Dr. and Mrs. Buckland, the younger Copleston, etc, etc. It was an extremely agreeable conversazione. Tea was over when we entered, and no refreshment was offered afterwards, but the talk was excellent, and spirited. Dr. Chalmers was curious and acute about our poor-laws, and knew a good deal about the United States; praised Dr. Channing for his intellectual power and eloquence, and considered his mind of the first order; thought Stuart the ablest man in America on the other side of the theological discussions going on there; and placed a great value on Abbott's Young Christian, and his other practical works. He is, I think, much gratified with the attentions shown him at Oxford, which seem to have been abundant for a week, and which might indeed flatter any man; but he also seems plain, straightforward, and sincere, speaking his broad Scotch as honestly as possible, and expressing his own opinions faithfully, but entirely
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
e Continent. In a resume of this autumnal visit in London, Mr. Ticknor says:— I dined once with my old friend Lady Dudley Stuart. She is a good deal altered in person, and has feeble health, but her essential character is the same that I knew eighteen years ago. Christine Bonaparte. See ante, p. 183, and note. Lord Dudley Stuart was at Lord Brougham's on a visit. The company consisted of the Duke de Regina, the Count del Medico,—who owns the Carrara quarries,—and two or three other pe amusement of the evening being music. An English composer, who is just bringing out an opera which he dedicates to Lady D. Stuart, came in and played and sang; and a Polish prince-among those who are indebted to Lord Dudley Stuart for carrying theLord Dudley Stuart for carrying the bill in favor of the Poles through Parliament—was there a little while, and improvisated with great talent. There was nothing English about it, any more than if we had all been in Italy. Dr. Holland, who travelled in Greece with Lord Byron, cam
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
460, 483. Stewart, General, 381. Stolberg, Countess, 125. Stolberg, Leopold, 125. Story, Judge, Joseph, 40, 316 note, 339, 340, 361; letter to, 392. Stroganoff, Count, 462, 464, 465, 468, 491. Stroganoff, Countess, 462, 486, 487. Stuart, Lady, Dudley, 446 and note. See Bonaparte, Christine. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, 446 and note. Subaltern, by Gleig, 380. Sullivan, Richard, 12. Sullivan, William, G. T. studies law with, 9, 11, 12, 20, 40, 381. Switzerland, visits, 152-160. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, 446 and note. Subaltern, by Gleig, 380. Sullivan, Richard, 12. Sullivan, William, G. T. studies law with, 9, 11, 12, 20, 40, 381. Switzerland, visits, 152-160. T Tagus River, 243. Talleyrand, Prince, 13, 123, 254, 258-263. Talma, 126, 127. Tarentum, Archbishop of, 174. Tatistcheff, M. de, 210, 212. Tatistcheff, Mad. de, 211. Taylor, Abbe, 173. Taylor, Henry, 418. Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. John, 425 and note, 432 note. Tazewell, Littleton Waller, 350, 381. Tchitchagof, Admiral, 179 Teba, Count de, 233, 235. Teba, Countess de, 233, 234 and note, 309. Testchen, visits, 504-509. Thacher, Rev. S C., 11 Thayer, Sylvanus, Colone
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Appendix A. (search)
our own, will be sufficient to answer all your purposes, and all my expectations, which are but few, although you may think they are many. . . . . You may imagine, by my writing to you so much and so frequently on the improvement of time, and on the economy of your expenses, that I am not only very much concerned, but that I am very solicitous about you. If you have any such idea as this, you are greatly mistaken. I have no fear, except for your health and happiness. If you suppose Professor Stuart and I expect too much from you and Everett, you and he should not write such flattering accounts to Dr. Kirkland and Savage, of the advantages which Gottingen possesses over Cambridge and other universities in this country. So long as you and he draw such strong comparisons, and tell us that the University of Gottingen possesses ten times the advantages, and that a student can progress ten times as fast under her auspices as one can under those of our universities, what must be the fai
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
Ellice, Mr., II. 181. Ellice, Young, II. 149. Elliot, Author of Corn Law Rhymes, I. 441. Elmsley, Peter, I. 58 and note. Elphinstone, Right Hon. Mount-Stuart, II. 68, 70, 72, 154. Elwin, Rev. W., II. 865, 867, 369. Emmet, Thomas Addis, I. 39, 40, 41 note. Empson, William, II. 152, 154, 155. Encke, J. F., II465, 468, 491. Stroganoff. Countess, I. 462, 486, 487. Strutt, Hon J. W., II. 482. Stuart, Abbe, II. 80, 82. Stuart de Rothesay, Lord, II. 64. Stuart, Lady, Dudley, I. 446 and note. See Bonaparte, Christine. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, I. 446 and note. Sturgis, II. P., II. 445 note. Sturgis, Russell, II. 390. Stuart, Lord, Dudley, I. 446 and note. Sturgis, II. P., II. 445 note. Sturgis, Russell, II. 390. Subaltern, by Gleig, I. 380. Sulivan, Miss, II. 482. Sullivan, Richard, I. 12. Sullivan, William, I. 9, 11, 12, 20, 40, 381. Sulmoua, Prince (since Borghese), II. 61, 66, 84. Sulmona, Princess, II. 61, 66. Sumner, Charles, II. 199, 296, 297. Survilliers, Countess, II. 87. Sussex, Duke of, II. 152. Switzerlan