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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 18 0 Browse Search
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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 18: the battle of Antietam. (search)
ches overhead. While descending this slope, Ernest A. Nichols, of Company C, a lad of but 17, was hit by a spent ball on the breast plate and fell forward. Someone said Nichols is gone but he sprang up again and took his place in the ranks, saying I'm not killed yet. Major Rice heard his remark and responded, There's a brave man. The division moved on through this wood with the ranks being depleted at every step. Gen. Sumner did not know that there were ten Confederate brigades with Stuart's Unseen Guns concealed behind the ridge in front and behind fences between the Dunker church and the house of a man named Miller, east of the turnpike, ready to swing upon Sedgwick. Their centre was in a cornfield behind a stone wall, which was crowned with artillery and infantry at every available point. Hooker's Corps had again been forced back and Burnside had, as yet, failed to carry the bridge. The Division was still in close column by Brigade lines, which made it impossible to
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 27: the Gettysburg Campaign. (search)
t night. The Nineteenth Massachusetts, was the reply. Thank God, said Hancock, we'll have a good rest tonight. There's no fool business about that regiment. Stuart's cavalry came through the Gap on the 24th and outflanked Hancock, and on the 25th he started back toward Haymarket, but when Stuart interposed his cavalry the coStuart interposed his cavalry the corps kept to the left to avoid an encounter which would use up time and be of no benefit. When near Haymarket, Stuart opened on the brigade with his artillery from a hill at the right, wounding a few men and causing a halt until a battery was placed in position which, opening fire on his line, soon caused him to draw off and the mStuart opened on the brigade with his artillery from a hill at the right, wounding a few men and causing a halt until a battery was placed in position which, opening fire on his line, soon caused him to draw off and the march was continued without molestation and in a drizzling rain which steadily increased until it fell in torrents. The regiment encamped for the night at Gum Springs. Here the brigade of four New York regiments commanded by Gen. Alexander Hays joined the corps. Gen. Hays assumed command of the Third Brigade. The last part o
by Gen. Hancock. On the morning of the second of July, the Sixth and Fifth Corps had not yet taken up their final positions. The Fifth Corps had a march of 36 miles to make in the night of July 1st and the morning of the 2nd and that morning passed very quietly for the other Union forces. Notwithstanding Ewell's success, Lee made no effort until the balance of his army could get up, under Longstreet, and this occupied the entire forenoon. Far in the north could be seen the dust made by Stuart, returning from his wild escapade around the Union army. Down to the left, Kilpatrick and his men were seen to come up. The Union troops were rapidly getting their positions and there was a feeling that a hard struggle was before them. Failure to drive the enemy, everyone knew, meant invasion of the North. Lee's failure to drive Meade and Hancock meant, perhaps, the destruction of his army. The summer sun gilded leaf and trunk, hill and plain. Light summer airs just stirred flag and p
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
iv., (H), Dec. 1, ‘61; 22; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Stone, Vertulan R., ass't surg., (F and G), Nov. 6, ‘62; disch. May 11, ‘63. Strange, James, priv., (B), Apr. 24, ‘62; 21; wounded May 10, ‘64; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; disch. for insanity June 5, ‘65; abs. wounded alias Thos. J. Shaw. Stringer, Thos., priv., (B), Feb. 19, ‘64; 23; M. O. June 30, ‘65; abs. pris. from June 22, ‘64, to Apr. 28, ‘65; disch. July 7, ‘65. Strickland, Wm., priv., (—), Dec. 8, ‘62; 21; N. F.R. Stuart, Alonzo E., priv., (F), Apr. 8, ‘64; 21; abs. pris. since May 6, ‘64. Suchester, Edward, priv., (E), Feb. 15, ‘65; 40; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Sullin, Daniel, priv., (K), Aug. 13, ‘61; 35; deserted in Co. C May 3, ‘63 while on 10 days furlough. Sullivan, Daniel, priv., (—), June 2, ‘64; 36; sub. H. L. Ashley; N. F.R. Sullivan, Humphrey O., priv., (F), Aug. 1, ‘61; 20; re-en. Mar. 7, ‘64; deserted Apr. 11, ‘64; see O'Sullivan. Sullivan, James
93, 210 Stone, William A., 106, 144, 152, 200, 201, 210, 222, 248, 258, 260, 262, 333, 356 Strange, James,.................................................... 285, 323 Stringer, Thomas,................................................ 328 Stuart, General,.................................................... 215 Stuart's Unseen Guns.............................................. 136 Sullivan, James,...................................................... 293 Sullivan, John,..................Stuart's Unseen Guns.............................................. 136 Sullivan, James,...................................................... 293 Sullivan, John,........................................................ 104 Sullivan, Michael,................................................... 51 Sullivan, Michael, (E),............................................ 106, 144 Sullivan, Patrick, (G),.................................................. 145 Sumner, E. V., Maj. Gen.,....55,58, 113, 133, 134, 136, 137, 156, 158, 160, 164 Sunken Road, Antietam,............................................... 133 Sweeney, M.,...................................................
e, Who on Antietam's gun-swept field Their noble lives to Freedom gave. At Fredericksburg the boats we man, Under the fire from trench and slope, And, with the Seventh Michigan, We form once more ‘The forlorn hope.’ On Gettysburg's famed heights we stand, And form the long, thin line of blue, Whose courage high, and valor grand, The fiery Pickett's charge o'erthrew. All through the gloomy Wilderness, In rough dug graves we leave our dead; At Spottsylvania, back we press The line of gray, by Stuart led. Cold Harbor's flaming cannon boom, And thin our weak and shattered lines; And comrades fall, and find a tomb Amidst Deep Bottom's tangled vines. At Petersburg we stand again Where strong redoubts the hillsides crown; We see beyond the intrenched plain The lofty steeples of the town. Disaster at Reams' Station came, When from its trenches we are hurled; On Appomattoxa field of fame We see the flag of treason furled. And from war's sad and gory fields, With tattered banners borne above,