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ld, among which was the body of the lamented Col. Lomax. An omnibus was sent out to get as many as possible, but this was captured by the enemy. The Yankees advanced to the edge of a piece of woods, within about two hundred yards of our line, where they halted and remained at dusk. Gen. Mahone's brigade was soon reenforced by several brigades which were drawn up a short distance in its rear, while a large force was placed near by in reserve. President Davis, Gens. Lee, Smith, Longstreet, Stuart, and other commanding generals were upon the ground at this point, showing that it was an important position in the affairs of the day. Thus matters stood at sundown. As no further attack was anticipated during the night, our troops prepared to bivouac on the field, in readiness for the events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The Twelfth Virginia and the Thir
r to be, General, your obedient servant, J. E. B. Stuart, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Cavalry. Gen. R. issance of their position and strength, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart ordered the First, (Col. Fitz-Hugh Lee,orporated in the detail, as also two pieces of Stuart's flying artillery--a twelve-pound howitzer anilled and wounded scores of the enemy; pleased Stuart, and had one man killed — poor Capt. Latane! ry cannot show such another exploit as this of Stuart's! He spoke the truth, honestly and roughly, nished and applauds ; McClellan is disgraced ; Stuart and his troopers are now forever in history. illiant in its execution. On Thursday, Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, with the First and Ninth regiments of and the cavalry of Cobb's Legion, and three of Stuart's artillery, left our lines on a reconnoissanc and Second regiments of Virginia cavalry, General Stuart; the Jeff Davis Legion, the cavalry of the city yesterday. Much praise is accorded Gen. Stuart by his command for his bravery and coolness[6 more...]
ing, intrepid Gen. Wheat was instantly killed by a ball through the brain. At a later hour of the evening, one of his compatriots, Gen. Hood, of the Texas brigade, dashed into a Yankee camp, and took a thousand prisoners. And so with Jackson and Stuart pushing on toward the Pamunkey to intercept the enemy's retreat to West-Point, should it be attempted, and McClellan with his main body retiring toward the south (or Richmond) side of the Chickahominy before our victorious troops, the second day . The remainder of Saturday was marked by the capture of the Fourth New-Jersey (Stockton's) regiment, the Eleventh Pennsylvania, and the famous Bucktails, with their regimental standards, by rapid and wholly successful movements of Jackson and Stuart, between the Chickahominy and the Pamunkey, taking the York River Railroad, and cutting off McClellan's communication with his transports, and destroying his line of telegraph. At this time high hopes were entertained of speedily destroying or c
nth in the direction of Louisa Court-House, captured the Adjutant-General of Gen. Stuart, and was very near capturing that officer himself. Among the papers taken was an autograph letter of General Robert Lee to General Stuart, dated Gordonsville, August fifteenth, which made manifest to me the disposition and force of the enemy lower fords of the Rappahannock. A captured letter from Gen. Robert Lee to Gen. Stuart, dated at Gordonsville, August fifteenth, clearly indicates their movement. eceived a request from General Bayard to attend a conference with the rebel General Stuart relative to the cessation of hostilities, for the purpose of attending to tegraph was destroyed, and the track of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad torn up. Stuart yesterday sent a message to Abe by another line. I have seen the Baltimore Sunoc among the rebels. The force of the rebels was composed of five hundred of Stuart's old cavalry and a regiment of Tennessee infantry, together with the two batte
out on the sixteenth in the direction of Louisa Court-House, captured the Adjutant-General of Gen. Stuart, and was very near capturing that officer himself. Among the papers taken was an autograph letter of General Robert Lee to General Stuart, dated Gordonsville, August fifteenth, which made manifest to me the disposition and force of the enemy and their determination to overwhelm the army under whatever on the lower fords of the Rappahannock. A captured letter from Gen. Robert Lee to Gen. Stuart, dated at Gordonsville, August fifteenth, clearly indicates their movement. We had several ht the same time received a request from General Bayard to attend a conference with the rebel General Stuart relative to the cessation of hostilities, for the purpose of attending to the dead and woundter which the telegraph was destroyed, and the track of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad torn up. Stuart yesterday sent a message to Abe by another line. I have seen the Baltimore Sun of today. They
right, similarly protected. The firing was opened by the rebels with shell, to which our guns replied by a quick and rapid discharge of grape and shell. The shots of the rebels fell far wide of the mark, while their shells, in many cases, either did not explode at all, or exploded in the air. On our own side the shells were thrown with remarkable accuracy, and exploded just in the nick of time, doing great havoc among the rebels. The force of the rebels was composed of five hundred of Stuart's old cavalry and a regiment of Tennessee infantry, together with the two batteries named, comprising eight or ten guns. Our cavalry at one time made a charge upon that of the rebels, in which we completely routed them with severe loss, a number of them being seen to relax their hold on the bridles of the horses, which were subsequently led away by the comrades of the wounded. Sharp skirmishing also took place between the soldiers of the One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania regiment and the
on, fronting Buell's army. On the evening of the seventh a portion of the right wing of the army of the Mississippi (Cheatham's division, composed of Donelson's, Stuart's and Maney's brigades) moved from Harrodsburgh to Perryville, where they rested on their arms in line of battle till daylight. The pickets skirmished all night.ed, probably for this reason, but more probably because they could not withstand the impetuous valor of our troops. About this time — probably a little earlier — Stuart's brigade moved into action, in perfect order and with great coolness. The troops first engaged, worn and weary, rushed on with Stuart's men, and the rout on theStuart's men, and the rout on the left became general. The enemy re-formed their lines several times, but were no sooner restored than they were broken. The fighting was kept up till night put an end to the conflict. We had then driven the enemy from three to five miles along the whole line of the two armies. We formed our lines and remained on the ground
up the telegraph from Gordonsville. An hour later, a large body of Stuart's cavalry came up to attack them. These too were defeated, driven lmost unexpectedly a large force of cavalry (afterwards found to be Stuart's) came down on the right. I ordered up the reserve, and the enemydful of men were hastening the work of destruction, a large body of Stuart's cavalry appeared at a short distance. Had they charged they woulours, routed a vastly superior rebel force, composed principally of Stuart's famous cavalry, destroyed several thousand dollars' worth of prop extent. A Richmond paper, found in the rebel camp, stated that Gen. Stuart was building a bridge across the North Anna River, over which hemmit depredations in this direction. Col. Kilpatrick left word for Stuart that he need take no more trouble about the bridge, as we should gihannock is about to prove rather a troublesome neighbor, and unless Stuart's men exercise more courage their laurels will very soon have faded
Doc. 194.-rebel raid on Manassas, Va. The following is the Philadelphia Inquirer's account of the rebel raid upon Manassas: Alexandria, August 27, 1862. There was an important rebel raid on Manassas last night, the details of which I give you, having just arrived from near that locality, as correctly as the excitement of the hour will permit. The regular train, which should have arrived here last night at ten o'clock, was attacked by about four hundred of Stuart's cavalry, under command of Lee, at Bristow, a place some four miles and a half west of Manassas. The first intimation the passengers had of the approaching danger was a sudden shock, occasioned by the engine running into a pile of ties placed upon the track. Fortunately the machine was going at a high rate of speed, and the obstruction was removed without throwing the train from the track. The rebel cavalry had undoubtedly concluded upon no such result, for they were drawn up in line on each side of the
sterday in front of Shepherdstown. The Ninth Virginia cavalry, which was on picket, repulsed the enemy several times by vigorous charges, disputing the ground step by step, back to the main body. By the time his artillery reached him, Col. W. F. H. Lee, who was in command of the brigade, was obliged to place it on the west bank of the Opequon, on the flank of the enemy, as he approached Martinsburgh. Gen. Hampton's brigade had retired through Martinsburgh, on the Tuscarora road, when Gen. Stuart arrived and made dispositions to attack. Lee's brigade was advanced immediately, and Hampton's ordered forward. The enemy retired at the approach of Lee along the Shepherdstown road, and was driven across the Potomac by the cavalry, with a severe loss, and darkness alone prevented it from being a signal victory. His rear was overtaken and put to flight, our cavalry charging in gallant style under a severe fire of artillery, driving squadron after squadron, killing a number, wounding mo