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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
ennsylvania we camped near Culpeper Court-house for a short time, where we were once ordered out, on a Sunday, to meet the Yankee cavalry, reported advancing on the Warrenton road. None of our infantry, however, became engaged. Camped at Orange Court-house. We were then moved to Orange Court-house, and went into camp in a piece of woods belonging to a Doctor Taliaferro, near the residence of a Mr. Somerville, where we remained doing picket duty on the river at Morton's Ford, until General Stuart's fight at Jacks's shops. Ordered to Liberty Mills to support cavalry. We were then ordered to Liberty Mills, as a support to our cavalry, but the brigade did not become generally engaged; that part of it which was sent to guard the road leading to Stanardsville repulsed a body of Yankee cavalry which had been driving some of ours. Winter quarters at Liberty Mills. When the infantry returned to Orange Court-house, we were left to picket the Rapidan at Liberty Mills, and soon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
rear rank, and afterward acting as chaplain in both Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps, I had some peculiar facilities for seeing and knowing what occurred. Personally acquainted with Robert E. Lee, J. E. Johnston, Beaureguard, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Early, Edward Johnson, Rodes, Pender, Heth, Wilcox, Hampton, Fitzhugh Lee, W. H. F. Lee, John B. Gordon, Pegram, J. A. Walker, and a large number of others of our leading officers, I at the same time made it my duty to know thrner Ashby, whose raven locks and soldierly bearing even then attracted attention, and whose name had become famous when he fell in June, 1862, as Brigadier-General of cavalry, but gallantly leading an infantry charge. I saw here also Colonel J. E. B. Stuart, who afterwards became the idol of the army, Colonel E. Kirby Smith, who was to surrender, as General commanding, the trans-Mississippi Department, Major Whiting, who was to win his wreath and stars and imperishable glory for his brave d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
on the 18th of July Johnston left a cordon of Stuart's cavalry to conceal the movement from Generale latter part of July, or the first of August, Stuart, with five companies of the First Maryland and. It was my privilege to see a good deal of Stuart at this period, at his Headquarters, on a red orchard, a tomato patch, or a cornfield, when Stuart would call for volunteers to drive in the enemdifferent points. On the 11th of September, Stuart took 305 men of the Thirteenth Virginia, two ctachment of cavalry. I remember how delighted Stuart was, as he declared, We have whipped them out Your old friend, Griffin. To this note Stuart made the following reply: Dear Griffinbefore long. Yours to count on, beauty. Stuart was made a Brigadier-General for his gallantryn on picket at Bealton Station as a support to Stuart's cavalry, and the enemy were rapidly advancinld, but we never forgot those bright days with Stuart, when we had our outpost service with the foot[3 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stuart's last dispatch. (search)
Stuart's last dispatch. The following is, so far as we have been able to learn, the last dispatch every sent by the great Confederate cavalryman, J. E. B. Stuart. Remembering that he was confronting overwhelming odds, and was about to lay down that very evening his noble life, this dispatch, which has never before been in J. E. B. Stuart. Remembering that he was confronting overwhelming odds, and was about to lay down that very evening his noble life, this dispatch, which has never before been in print, will have a sad interest and will be recognized by those who knew him, as having the clarion ring which always characterized the dispatches of this glorious cavalryman; of whom it has been truly said that he never believed he could be whipped, and could never bring himself to acknowledge that he had been defeated: Noy artillery bearing on a dust near Yellow Tavern. The enemy fights entirely as infantry to-day — though yesterday we got in with sabres with good execution. I am glad to report enemy's killed large in proportion. Most respectfully, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. The enemy may yet turn toward James river. J. E. B. S.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
of new companies of cavalry and artillery were formed (on paper), and if these plans had been carried out, the whole army would have been converted into cavalry and artillery. But the disasters at Forts Henry and Donaldson brought us to our senses, the patriotism of the men promptly responded, and most of them enlisted for the war, while the conscript law, which was now passed, settled the matter with any one who wavered. The Thirteenth Foot cavalry had tried in vain to be transferred to Stuart's cavalry, and they now gracefully accepted the situation, enlisted for the war, and entered upon the reorganization by the election of new officers. This fatal defect in the law by which the men were allowed to choose their own officers would have demoralized almost any other troops in the world; but the splendid morale of our army, their high intelligence, and their devotion to the cause, brought us safely through this severest ordeal without serious damage. There were, of course, some g
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
our friends who may have facts bearing on the question to send them forward at once. Jeb. Stuart's correspondence at Lewinsville we quoted from a version we had at the time of its occurrence, bhern Historical Society Papers, you make mention of some correspondence which passed between General Stuart and some of his old army comrades about the time of the outpost affair near Lewinsville, Vir me if you please. Yours, &c., (Signed,) Orlando M. Poe., Lt. U. S. Top'l Eng'r. J. E. B. Stuart, Esq., Commanding cavalry near Fall's Church. In care of whoever finds this. Please answer both the note and Griffin's invitation. Upon the back of this sheet is the following in Stuart's own hand-writing: I have the honor to report that circumstances were such that they coulg from his speed, Griffin surely left for Washington to hurry up the dinner. (Signed), J. E. B. Stuart. We print the following letter in the hope that some one will be able to send the info
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.50 (search)
ymen, Ladies and Gentlemen: I am thrice happy in the circumstances under which you have called upon me. The eloquent and beautiful address to which you have listened has been so full in its recital as to require no addition. Again, the speaker saw all, and was a large part of that which he described, giving a life and vigor to his narration, which could not be attained by one who only, at second-hand, knew of the events. Your honored guest and orator, General Fitzhugh Lee, rode with Stuart in his perilous campaigns, shared his toils and dangers, took part in his victories, and became the worthy successor of that immortal chieftain. When the Army of Northern Virginia made its last march to Appomattox Court-house, a numerous foe hovering on his flanks and rear, little Fitz was there with the remnant of his cavalry to do and dare, and, if need be, die for Dixie. How vain it would be for any one to add to what has been said by such a witness. Again, and lastly, Jackson's char
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Expedition to Hardy and Hampshire. (search)
ers. Only fifty of the wagons were saved and brought to the valley. Everything else is now safe in the valley. I am, Major, most respectfully, Your obedient servant, Thos. L. Rosser, Brigadier-General. Major H. B. McClellan, A. A. General Stuart's Cavalry Corps. Endorsements. Headquarters cavalry corps A. N. V., April 7th, 1864. Respectfully forwarded. The bold and successful enterprise herein reported furnishes additional proofs of General Rosser's merit as a commander, and adds fresh laurels to that veteran brigade, so signalized for valor already. J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. Headquarters Army Northern Va., 19th April, 1864. Respectfully forwarded for the information of the War Department. General Rosser acquitted himself with great credit in this expedition. R. E. Lee, General. Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War, by order, Samuel W. Melton, Major & A. A. G. A. & I. G. O., 30th April, 1864. A. G.--Noted General Rosser exhibited
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations around Winchester in 1863. (search)
to the left and advanced in line of battle in the direction of the enemy's column to cut off their retreat. The Second and Fifth Regiments were moved forward and formed in line of battle on the right of the road, and on the right flank of General Stuart's brigade. At this juncture, Captain Douglas, of Major-General Johnson's staff, informed me that the whole of my command was needed on the right. I directed Captain Arnall, of my staff, to recall the Fourth, Twenty-Seventh, and Thirty-Third Regiments from the left and bring them to the support of the Second and Fifth on the right. Advancing at once with the Second and Fifth Regiments through the fields in right of the woods, in which General Stuart's brigade was posted, we crossed the railroad and reached the turnpike without encountering the enemy. The smoke and fog was so dense that we could only see a few steps in front, and when, on reaching the Martinsburg turnpike, I saw a body of men about fifty yards to the west of tha
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
the Secretary of War: The President's order has been received — is in process of execution. This is a crushing blow to us. We have seen how Jackson eluded the snare set for him, beat his enemies in detail at Cross Keys and Port Republic, deceived them as to his plans, and hastened to obey the orders he received from General Lee to join him on the Chickahominy. This great commander, who had succeeded to the command of the army on the wounding of General Johnston at Seven Pines, had sent Stuart on his famous ride around McClellan, had discovered the weak point of his antagonist, and was thus prepared to strike so soon as Jackson should arrive at the designated point on the enemy's flank. In his official report General McClellan seeks to make the impression that his movements during the seven days battles were simply a preconceived change of base, and a number of writers have adopted this theory and write as if Lee simply endeavored to prevent McClellan from fulfilling his purpos
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