Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. E. B. Stuart or search for J. E. B. Stuart in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
zhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. Willionets and Grape!’ hear Stonewall roar. Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score In Stonewall Jackson'series. Field Notes at Chancellorsville from Stuart and Jackson. Lexington, Ky., January 27, 18spatches written by Stonewall Jackson. General Stuart writes to General Jackson as follows: hay God grant us victory. Yours truly, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. Upon the back of thion that hill from which were borne Simmons and Stuart, and in that pen where Russell fell and found s Hill and Lewinsville, under the dashing J. E. B. Stuart; and then came the long winter in huts ont the rule of our lives in the front under Jeb Stuart, was vigilance, and on this occasion it was noaths in the country around Manassas unknown to Stuart's Cavalry. They had learned them all, as the ers can love such a leader as the glorious Jeb Stuart. Laying the corner Stone of the monument to[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ords, then, become the weapons with which we are to fight over again, before the forum of the world's judgment, the great war of secession and independence. In that contest the Southern mind and the Southern tongue and pen will not be less brilliant but more successful than than the Southern heart and the Southern sword. Let us do what we can to help this great purpose and end. Fellow citizens and guests, I offer you the name and fame of Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy comrade in the saddle of Stuart and of Hampton, and the good deeds of J. William Jones, the Chaplain of The Boys in Gray, whose life-work will perpetuate on the enduring page the memory of our heroes living and dead. Our printers report our space all filled, and we must reluctantly leave out what we had to say of Augusta, Athens, Rome, and Greenville, S. C., at all of which places we met a cordial greeting, and were placed under high obligations for courtesies freely extended. But we must say, that Colonel C. C. Jon
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Stonewall Jackson's way. (search)
es to scoff; Attention! it's his way. Appealing from his native sod, In forma pauperis, to God, “Lay bare thine arms! Stretch forth thy rod; Amen!” —that's Stonewall's way. He's in the saddle now. Fall in! Steady, the whole brigade! Hill's at the ford, cut off. We'll win His way out, ball and blade. What matter if our shoes are worn? What matter if our feet are torn? Quick step! We're with him before dawn. That's Stonewall Jackson's way. The sun's bright lances rout the mists Of morning; and, by George! Here's Longstreet struggling in the lists, Hemmed in an ugly gorge. Pope and his Yankees whipped before, ‘Bayonets and Grape!’ hear Stonewall roar. Charge, Stuart! Pay off Ashby's score In Stonewall Jackson's way! Ah, maiden! wait and watch, and yearn For news of Stonewall's band. Ah, widow! read with eyes that burn That ring upon thy hand. Ah, wife! sew on, pray on, hope on; Thy life shall not be all forlorn, The foe had better ne'er been born That gets in Stonew
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes and Queries. (search)
Notes and Queries. Field Notes at Chancellorsville from Stuart and Jackson. Lexington, Ky., January 27, 1883. Rev. J. Wm. Jones, Richmond, Va.: My Dear Sir,—Mrs. Thos. R. Price, of Richmondly submitted to my perusal some letters and papers left by her son, Major R. Channing Price, General Stuart's Adjutant-General, who was killed in battle near Chancellorsville, on 1st May, 1863. Among these I find one of the last field dispatches written by Stonewall Jackson. General Stuart writes to General Jackson as follows: headquarters cavalry division, 12 M., May 1st, 1863. Generalcommunicate through Wickham and Owens to you. May God grant us victory. Yours truly, J. E. B. Stuart, Major-General. Upon the back of this dispatch General Jackson writes, evidently whileclosed on Chancellorsville. Yours very truly, T. J. Jackson, Lieutenant-General. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. What a commentary upon the lives of these two great men! Yours very truly,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
ge. Dissensions and rivalries have brought defeat. The Fifth, unmoved, indignant and devoted, their battery sacrificed, seized the first guns abandoned in their rear, and with Austin's help check the enemy and save the bridge. Joe Johnston comes, and Dalton's cantonments ring with joy. With spring, Sherman attempts the portals of the pass, and Rocky-face and Buzzard's Roost repell him to Snake Gap. Resaca finds us in the thickest fray, and on that hill from which were borne Simmons and Stuart, and in that pen where Russell fell and found a grave beneath the cannon's trail, the Fifth Company never showed more coolness, more valor, nor more fortitude. In quick succession came Calhoon, Adairsville, Kingston and Cassville's lost opportunity. The Etowah is crossed, Dalton and New Hope Church claim more precious lives. 'Tis McGregor, 'tis Winston, 'tis Billy Sewell, with his last breath whispering into Slocomb's ear: Captain, haven't I done my duty? Can Pine Mountain and Kennesaw R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
voice caught up the cheer along the line. Thus, in the two engagements of July 18 and 21 the trial was met and successfully. And now came another trial, that of life in camp; sometimes more irksome to the true soldier than fighting, and yet not without its pleasures, which, however, are perhaps enjoyed more now in retrospection than was the reality at the time. The second company, under Rosser and Slocomb, had also won their spurs at Munson's Hill and Lewinsville, under the dashing J. E. B. Stuart; and then came the long winter in huts on the banks of Bull Run. Meanwhile the fifth company had sprung into existence in New Orleans, and at Shiloh the praise and admiration of the whole South was theirs for gallant fighting. Their guns were heard, too, at Monterey, Yorktown, Farmington and Corinth. And our batteries in Virginia were not idle, as Mechanicsville, Seven Pines, Gaines's Mill, Savage Station, Frazier's Farm, and Malvern Hill, will attest. Leaving McClellan upon t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A reminiscence of the Christmas of 1861. (search)
ntry pickets, to prevent any such interruption, but the rule of our lives in the front under Jeb Stuart, was vigilance, and on this occasion it was not relaxed. With song and jest and story interspcenes were being enacted. For us there was but one Christmas of the four we spent in service at Stuart's tavern; and of those who answered to the roll-call that day, how many could now answer Here! rs with our songs of triumph; and victory was the watchword of those who followed the feather of Stuart. The dinner passed pleasantly without interruption, and the stars had set their sentinel watcp, though the road was plain, and there were few paths in the country around Manassas unknown to Stuart's Cavalry. They had learned them all, as the infantry would say, in buttermilk ranging. I doeet no more, who counted it happiness to endure fatigue, hardships, and privations in the cause we loved, and under the man we loved as only soldiers can love such a leader as the glorious Jeb Stuart.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate Artillery at Second Manassas and Sharpsburg. (search)
Artillery)—(1). Attached to Anderson's Division, (Major Saunders, Chief of Artillery).—Huger's Battery; Moorman's; Grimes's—(3). There were also present, not assigned to special infantry commands: Washington Artillery, Colonel J: B. Walton.—Squire's (First Company); Richardson's (Second Company); Miller's (Third Company); Eshleman's (Fourth Company)—(4). Lee's Battalion, Colonel S. D. Lee.—Eubank's Battery; Jordan's; Parker's; Rhett's; Taylor's—(5). With the Cavalry under J. E. B. Stuart.—Pelham's Battery; Hart's (?)—(2). The following may have been present, but their assignments are not known to me: Leake's; Rogers' (Loudoun Artillery); Stribling's (Fauquier Artillery)—(3). There came up, after Second Manassas, from Richmond— Of the Reserve Artillery, five or six companies of Brown's First Virginia Regiment—Dance's (Powhatan Artillery); Hupp's (Salem Artillery); Macon's (Richmond Fayette Artillery); Watson's (Second Richmond
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 54 (search)
was one, the mystery of which, none of us could understand. The fact that General Stuart headed the expedition led many of us to believe that our journey southward understand. This was true of Colonels. As soon as we reached the town, General Stuart sent an order for its surrender, which was refused. A charge was made, buty, who fired upon our men from the windows of brick buildings. After this, General Stuart put his artillery into position and opened a terible cannonade, to which thonly how we, ourselves, might escape; but this was not so with that lady's man, Stuart. He seemed neither to suppose that his train was in danger, or that his men we to drive the enemy back should he attempt to move that way that night; but General Stuart being informed by the proper officer, that there was a limit to human enduraptured a great many Yankees. In the evening we drove the Yankees off, and General Stuart ordered us to follow them up. Our brigade endeavoured to take a piece of ar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
that hope is tested will they yield! As the day dawns, a remnant of the cavalry under Fitz. Lee is forming, and Gordon's infantry, scarce two thousand strong, are touching elbows for the last charge. Once more the thrilling rebel cheer rings through the Virginia woods, and with all their wonted fierceness they fall upon Sheridan's men. Ah! yes, victory still clings to the tattered battle-flags. Yes, the troopers of our gallant Fitz. are as dauntless as when they followed the plume of Stuart, the flower of cavaliers. Yes, the matchless infantry of tattered uniforms and bright muskets under Gordon, the brave, move with as swift, intrepid tread as when of old—Stonewall led the way. Soldiers of Manassas, of Richmond, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, of the Wilderness, of Spotsylvania, of Cold Harbor, of Petersburg—scarred and sinewy veterans of fifty fields, your glories are still about you, your manhood is triumphant still. Yes, the blue lines break befo
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