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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
e sturgeon beef at the same time for our workmen. In cavalry equipments, the main thing was to get a good saddle— one that did not ruin the back of the horse; for that, and not the rider's seat is the point to be achieved. The rider soon accommodates himself to the seat provided for him. Not so the animal's back, which suffers from a bad saddle. We adopted Jenifer's tree, which did very well while the horses were in good condition, and was praised by that prince of cavalrymen, General J. E. B. Stuart; but it came down on the horses backbone and withers as soon as the cushion of fat and muscle dwindled. The McClellan tree did better on the whole, and we finally succeeded in making a pretty good saddle of that kind—comfortable enough, but not as durable as the Federal article. In this branch of the service, one of the most difficult wants to supply was the horseshoe for cavalry and artillery. The want of iron and labor both were felt. Of course such a thing as a horseshoe mach
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Manufacture of infantry, Artillery and cavalry equipments. (search)
e sturgeon beef at the same time for our workmen. In cavalry equipments, the main thing was to get a good saddle— one that did not ruin the back of the horse; for that, and not the rider's seat is the point to be achieved. The rider soon accommodates himself to the seat provided for him. Not so the animal's back, which suffers from a bad saddle. We adopted Jenifer's tree, which did very well while the horses were in good condition, and was praised by that prince of cavalrymen, General J. E. B. Stuart; but it came down on the horses backbone and withers as soon as the cushion of fat and muscle dwindled. The McClellan tree did better on the whole, and we finally succeeded in making a pretty good saddle of that kind—comfortable enough, but not as durable as the Federal article. In this branch of the service, one of the most difficult wants to supply was the horseshoe for cavalry and artillery. The want of iron and labor both were felt. Of course such a thing as a horseshoe mach
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
ch contributions of money or merchandise as will make our efforts a success. Please make prompt reply if you can help us. With soldierly greetings, we are, Your old comrade Confeds, R. H. Fox, J. B. Mckenny, D. S. Redford, J. T. Ferriter, W. T. Ashby, Committee. the Mercer cavalry, from Spotsylvania county, Virginia, commanded by Lieutenant Waller, and not the Mercer county Cavalry, commanded by Lieutenant Walker, as it was by some oversight put in Captain Frayser's account of Stuart's Ride Around McClellan, was the company which charged with the Essex Dragoons when the lamented Latane fell. We are indebted for this correction to our gallant friend Captain Willie Campbell, of Essex. corrections in the Roster of the army of Northern Virginia, which we published in our January-February number, have come from several sources, and we solicit others, if errors are found. General N. H. Harris writes as follows: Vicksburg, Miss., February 4th, 1884. Rev. J. William
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph (search)
s, and we solicit further corrections if errors should be found. The following explain themselves: Richmond, February 1st, 1884. Dr. J. William Jones. Dear Sir,—I see that in your papers of January and February, 1884, on the Organization of the Army of Northern Virginia, you earnestly request corrections if errors are found. Colonel H. Clay Pate reported as Colonel of the Fifth Virginia Cavalry on 31st August, 1864; was killed in battle at the Yellow Tavern the same day our beloved Stuart was shot—to-wit., May 11th, 1864—and in a few days thereafter Colonel R. B. Boston, then Captain, was made Colonel, and so continued until killed in action at High Bridge on April 6th, 1865. I had the honor to belong to that gallant regiment, and know this to be true. I can never think of that soul of honor, Colonel Boston, without having my heart strangely stirred. Many of his men soon after, I candidly believe, almost envied his fate. Very truly yours, P. J. White. Auburn, Ala., <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
ls commanding armies, for many of the Federals sketched would not come under this head, while a number of Confederates who commanded armies, such as John B. Floyd, Henry A. Wise. J. A. Early, John B. Hood, S. D. Lee, Leonidas Polk, Stirling Price, Earl Van Dorn, Kirby Smith, Dick Taylor, Hardee, &c., are omitted. The truth is the Confederates largely outnumbered the Federals in men worthy of places in general history, and for Southern schools it is unpardonable to omit such names as Ashby, Stuart, Forrest, Hampton, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Pat. Cleburne, M. F. Maury, Buchanan, and scores of others who should be household words among our people. The sketches of Lee and Jackson are the only ones which make any pretence to being even fairly appreciative, (and they are both utterly unworthy of their subjects,) and that of Lee is marred by inexcusable blunders in his name, and place of birth, in giving him the position of commander-in-chief of the Confederate armies in 1862, and in apologizi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraph. (search)
matured, we will announce them; but we may say that in the meantime more money will be needed to carry out these plans, and contributions to the fund are still in order. the soldiers' home of the State of Louisiana has been fully organized, with General F. T. Nichols as President, and John H. Murray as Treasurer, and we have received the report for the year ending 1st of May, 1884, which gives a most encouraging exhibit of its affairs. They have twenty-two inmates of the Home, and seem to have made all proper arrangements for their care, and admirable regulations for the management of the Home. Colonel Heros von Borcke, the gallant and accomplished Prussian, who tendered his sword to the Confederacy and served with such distinction on the staff of General J. E. B. Stuart, is now on a visit to his old comrades, and has been received with open arms at Baltimore, Richmond, and at other points. Confederates generally will give him a warm welcome and a hearty greeting. Zzz
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from General Lee to President Davis on the situation in September, 1863. (search)
ent. The guns of three battalions of artillery have been called for, to go with General Longstreet, and have been forwarded to Richmond with that object. I think before they go it should be fully ascertained whether they can obtain horses for them in that region. If this cannot be done it would be worse than useless to carry them, as they would not only undergo the wear and tear and damage of transportation, but we might possibly lose them. A little after midnight on September 13th, General Stuart received notice of an intended advance of the enemy's cavalry, and made his preparations accordingly. On the morning of that day they came in force, having crossed the Rappahannock at all the fords, from Stark's on Hazel river to Kelly's. They were supported by a force of infantry. He skirmished with them all day and by 6 oa clock in the evening was pressed back to within half a mile of Cedar Mountain, with the loss, I regret to say, of three pieces of artillery. From this point he fe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Two anecdotes of General Lee. (search)
Brigadier-General Jos. R. Davis, of Mississippi, (nephew of Jefferson Davis), in the Army of Northern Virginia, will relate two little incidents which happened at the Battle of the Wilderness: On the eve of the 5th of May General Lee, with General Stuart, rode to the front, where Stuart's cavalry had encountered the advance of the Federal army. As they rode through the infantry, then awaiting orders, passing a farm-house, three young ladies stood at the gate of the residence, holding a packaStuart's cavalry had encountered the advance of the Federal army. As they rode through the infantry, then awaiting orders, passing a farm-house, three young ladies stood at the gate of the residence, holding a package, which from his gallantry, or good looks, or both, they entrusted to Capt. E. P. Thompson (nephew of Jake Thompson, and now a Mississippi editor), of General Davis's staff, with the request that he deliver the same to General Lee. It contained three handsomely embroidered colored merino overshirts, very much worn in the army. Capt. Thompson at once rode forward to overtake the General, who had by this time reached within range of the shots from Grant's skirmishers, and while under fire tend
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
ngth was Early's weakness. There is no evidence of military skill or strategy anywhere shown by the former. Of my old brigade I must be permitted to say it was composed of the best material Virginia could produce. For intelligence, moral worth, courage, and physical endurance it could not be surpassed, and it was backed by a patriotic devotion not excelled in the annals of war. It was the First, Second, Third, and Fourth Virginia regiments of cavalry and Brethead's old battery, known as Stuart's Horse Battery. Many of its field and company officers were educated soldiers; others were soldiers born, and promoted for distinguished services. (I had seventeen officers in my own regiment who had either graduated or been cadets at the Virginia Military Institute.) No officer could have received a more generous and cordial support than was accorded to myself. Their ready obedience to my orders under any and all circumstances endeared them to me. A mutual confidence bound us by all the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Major-General Fitzhugh Lee of the operations of the cavalry corps A. N. V. (search)
Griffin, Second Virginia cavalry. I cannot close this, my last official report, without commending for their valuable services the following officers of my staff not previously mentioned, and who at the last moment were found doing their duty on the fated field of Appomattox: Majors Mason and Treaner, Assistant Adjutant and Inspector-Generals; Major W. B. Warwick, Chief Commissary; Dr. A. C. Randolph, Chief Surgeon; Major Breathed, Chief of Artillery; Major G. M. Ryalls, formerly of General Stuart's staff; and Captain Lewellyn Saunderson, who, having just arrived from his native country, Ireland, joined me previous to the fall of Petersburg, and remained with me to the last. The proverbial intrepidity of the dashing Mason and reckless Breathed upon every battle-field of the war that the Army of Northern Virginia contended for is too well known for me to do more than refer to. Major Warwick, apart from his onerous duties, rendered services on many fields, his cool courage causing
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