Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. E. B. Stuart or search for J. E. B. Stuart in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Confederate dead in Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, Va. Memorial services, June 6, 1894. (search)
giment that was nearest the enemy, that, for the moment, was his favorite. Such, indeed, was his love of combat, that even at times when there was a cessation in the artillery firing, he utilized his leisure moments in riding along the skirmish line, or leading a squadron into action. Many are the stories told of Major Thomson's reckless daring. At Culpeper, in the fall of 1863, when the Federals advanced across the Rappahannock, and the overpowering numbers of infantry and cavalry forced Stuart to retire, one gun of his battery was captured. The enemy, by cunning action, had gotten in the rear, and driving off the supports, suddenly appeared, cutttng off all hope of escape, for swarms of Federals were at the same time pressing on front and flank. Major Thomson, stung with mortification at the loss of his gun, dashed at the leader of the charging troop, who was somewhat in advance of his men. Unhorsing him with a single shot, he seized the rein of the riderless steed, and amids
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
h the thunder of his guns and the sound of a great victory, and thus poured the living tide of hope into the bosoms of our forefathers. While there are monuments to him—one the highest on earth; while a monument has lately gone up to his mother; while monuments to our heroes stand all over the land, yet we want a monument in which should be represented the mothers, wives, daughters, and sisters of R. E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, Albert Sidney Johnston, Jubal A. Early, G. T. Beauregard, J. E. B. Stuart, George E. Pickett, Fitz Lee, and all the mothers, wives, sisters, and daughters of the Confederate Soldiers, living and dead; in short, to the Confederate Woman, looking as she did, when, with fair hands and bright eyes, she worked the banners and gave them to the boys to be unfurled in the bloody tempest; looking as she did when the shouts of victory throbbed her true, loving heart and flushed her cheeks; looking as she did when bad news reached her, and with anxious face and downcast
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
0, 1894.] The greatest cattle raid of the War—2,486 beeves driven from Coggin's Point into the Confederate lines. After that fateful day, May 11, 1864, when the bullet of the enemy took from the cavalry corps its great commander, J. E. B. Stuart, at Yellow Tavern, that man who Longstreet said was the greatest cavalryman America ever saw; that man upon whom Jackson threw his mantle, like Elijah of old; that man upon whom General Lee depended for eyes and ears—General Lee did not havethe mantle fell, and who was worthier? We have heard and do know of the achievements of this command and that command, from the pens of officers and privates, and I am glad it is so. I read everything of the kind I come across. I have read of Stuart's great ride around McClellan's army on the Chickahominy, and it was a wonderful performance. I know it is considered by military men as an unique feat. I wish I were able to describe it. I recall the enthusiasm it created, and also remember th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
was brought back and laid to rest in the old cemetery. In the days that followed I saw Jackson often; for the last time, just after the second battle of Manassas, early in September, 1862. I was then serving in the Eleventh Virginia Cavalry, of Stuart's Division, my command being encamped in Prince William county, Va. I was sick at the time, but having been refused a furlough by General Stuart, I preferred remaining in camp to going to the hospital. At last a friend of mine appealed to Generas, early in September, 1862. I was then serving in the Eleventh Virginia Cavalry, of Stuart's Division, my command being encamped in Prince William county, Va. I was sick at the time, but having been refused a furlough by General Stuart, I preferred remaining in camp to going to the hospital. At last a friend of mine appealed to General Jackson, who readily granted me leave of absence, and I went to my home in West Virginia. My next tidings of Jackson were that he was dead. Rufus R. Wilson.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
Secretary of War Sept. 2, ‘63, to rank from May 18, ‘63. Dec. 31, ‘62, 16th Tennessee Regiment, July 31, ‘63, 38th Alabama, Dec. 31, ‘63, Escort and Pioneer Corps Stuart's Division. Knott, J. J., Assistant Surgeon. Sept. 30, ‘63, 53d Georgia. Oct. 31, ‘63, no change. Knode, O. B., Surgeon. Dec. 3, ‘63, ordered to report to , 53d Alabama Cavalry. Moseley, W. H., Surgeon. June 30, 1864, Perrin's Regiment Cavalry. morrow, W. R., Assistant Surgeon. Oct 22, 1864, Medical Purveyor Stuart's Corps. Murphy, J. R., Assistant Surgeon. June 30, 1864, 31st Mississippi Regiment. Nash, miles H., Surgeon, com'd to rank 22d Aug. ‘62. Dec. 31, ‘62, at Cat3, to rank from April 29, ‘63. Passed Board at Chattanooga, May 9, ‘63, assigned by Foard to Academy Hospital. July 11, ‘63, Medical Purveyor Wheeler's Corps. Stuart, J. D., Surgeon, on duty by order of Secretary of War April 21, ‘63, to report to Medical-Director Ramsay. Sept. 30, ‘63, 65th Georgia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
had in the late war, or to afford opportunities for such leaders as Lee, Joseph E. Johnston, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Jackson, Stuart, and Early. The fact is that since the battle of Sedgmoor, fought August 5, 1665, between the Duke of Monmouth, some 6,0Commander of the Bath, lieutenant-general and field marshal. What do these cavalrymen know of war compared to Forrest, Stuart, Hampton, Wheeler, or the cavalry Lees? Robert Cornelius Napier, Lord Napier of Magdala, as he is familiarly called, ht comes with death, as it did to Charles XII, to Wallerstein, to Gustavus Adolphus, to Hampden and Sidney, to Jackson and Stuart, to Polk, to Cleburne, to Pegram and Pelham, to Wolfe, to Warren, and Sidney Johnston; whether it comes by wounds, as to Lee and Jackson and A. P. Hill, yon Howitzer upon your highway, and yon sentinel upon the hilltop will be lonesome till Stuart and Early shall join them here. On March 2d last, in the town of Lynchburg, where he had resided since the war, in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
an, Mr. Charles L. Todd, Major N. V. Randolph, Hon. J. Taylor Ellyson, Mr. William H. Curtis, Rev. Frank Stringfellow, Mr. W. J. Binford, Mr. L. B. Vaughan, Mr. J. E. B. Stuart, Mr. Joseph Bryan, Mr. Carlton McCarthy, Mr. Robert S. Bosher, Mr. C. V. Meredith, Mr. Joseph B. Welsh, Mr. Norvell Ryland, Colonel W. P. Smith, Colonel ChaY. Downman, Captain E. D. Hotchkiss, Captain Stewart McGuire, Captain H. C. Hubbell. Major Branch commanded the squadron, which was formed as follows: Troop A, Stuart Horse Guard, Captain E. J. Euker, forty men in line. Troop F, Chesterfield, Captain I. C. Winston, twenty-eight men in line. Troop H, Henrico, Lieutenant GeIII. Booted and spurred, his troopers riding ever Ready for the fierce fray, entwined around His brows the laurel leaves that made forever Thenceforth the name of Stuart glory-crowned: They followed where he led They conquered where he bled; Gladly had each one died in the lost leader's stead. IX. Can you not hear booming across