Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. E. B. Stuart or search for J. E. B. Stuart in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The honor roll of the University of Virginia, from the times-dispatch, December 3, 1905. (search)
, Charlottesville, Va., 1862. Smith, F. W., Lt. Col., Va., Amelia Co., Va., 1865. Smith, S., Capt. Va., University of Va., 1864. Somerville, J. M., Tenn., Atlanta, Ga., 1864. Somerville, W., Asst. Surg. Va., Mitchells, Va., 1862. St. Clair, O. M., Mo., Vicksburg, Miss., 1862. Stevens, H. L., S. C., Manassas, Va., 1862. Stirling, T. P., S. C., Richmond, Va., 1863. Stovall, J. B., Surg., N. C., Granville, N. C. Strain, E. H., Asst. Surg., Va., Richmond, Va., 1864. Stuart, G. W., Va., Fredericksburg, Va., 1863. Swann, S. R., Surg., Va., Norfolk, Va., 1862. Sykes. W. E., Adjt., Miss., Decatur, Ala., 1864. Scott, R. E., Va., Fauquier Co., Va., 1862. Scott, W. C., Col., Va., Powhatan, Va., 1865. Shields, W. S., Lt., Tenn., Corinth, Miss., 1862. Smith, R. B., Lt., Col., Va., Warrenton Va., 1865. Tallaferro, F. W., Va., Chancellorsville, Va., 1863. Tayloe, L., Lt. Col., Va., Raccoon Ford, Va., 1863. Taylor, E. P., Va., 1862. Taylor, T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The crisis of the Confederacy (search)
render them impossible, or suicidal. All that could be accomplished by shock-tactics was effected against cavalry and small bodies of infantry, but the magnificent fighting qualities of the cavalry (developed by Hampton, and Forrest, and not by Stuart, as the author supposes), were displayed as dismounted riflemen, where they equalled infantry in deadly work and staying-power and were enabled to excel them in mobility and dash by means of their horses. Gettysburg, the author considers the t Confederate corps commanders, and lack of needed support to attack delivered, but Lee was not in fault. He necessarily depended upon the cavalry for keeping him thoroughly informed of the position of the enemy, and this duty he had entrusted to Stuart, who disappeared with the flower and bulk of the cavalry, and did not report to the army until after the first day's fighting. The rest of the cavalry was required to guard lines of communication to the rear. Meanwhile Lee, deprived of the eye
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
ong these, I regret to say, was the failure of General Stuart to follow the order Lee's Report July 31, 18position on the right of our column as it advanced, Stuart followed the right of the Federal column, thus placme he crossed the Potomac had no communication with Stuart until after the battle on the 1st of July, when he heard that Stuart was at Carlisle, and Stuart did not reach Gettysburg unit the afternoon of July 2d. Lee, reStuart did not reach Gettysburg unit the afternoon of July 2d. Lee, referring to Stuart, says: By the route he pursued the Federal army was interposed between his command and our mStuart, says: By the route he pursued the Federal army was interposed between his command and our main body, preventing any communication with him until he arrived at Carlisle. The march toward Gettysburg was time the hot pursuit of Stonewall Jackson. Ah! if Stuart had been there, to give one bugle blast and to set the left, rout and cut off their right wing, where Stuart waited with his cavalry to charge upon them; and thder, Williams, Patton, Allen, and Owen is dying and Stuart mortally wounded. Three lieutenant-colonels are ki
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
ongstreet's corps. General Lee instructed General Stuart to keep on General Longstreet's right, or sed by the absence of his main cavalry force. Stuart was not there, as Lee had designed, to cover hly he asked whether I had any knowledge of General Stuart. I told him that I had forded the Potomacft at Williamsport, who said they had left General Stuart the day before in Prince William county, VTaylor why General Lee was concerned about General Stuart, and whether they were not informed about , and he replied that General Lee expected General Stuart to report before that time in Pennsylvaniand with serious consequences. Lieutenant-General J. E. B. Stuart was but thirty years of age at G Early was retiring from York toward Cashtown; Stuart, of whose whereabouts General Lee knew nothingsburg, said, I cannot think what has become of Stuart. I ought to have heard from him long before nmovements of his own separated divisions. General Stuart used the discretion given, and believed he[8 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
killed near Culpepper C. H. Thomas Rogers and Stuart were killed at South Mountain. James Posey, Wn the course of his successors, Lee, Johnston, Stuart, A. P. Hill, Rodes and others. Lee and Jackso caused him to turn over the command to Gen. J. E. B. Stuart of the cavalry, one of the most dashingpeper C. H., where we stayed a day supporting Stuart's cavalay, while he drove back some raiders ne Attempted to storm the heights, but failed. Stuart sent back a large number of captured wagons. victory. We have every confidence in Lee and Stuart. July 4. A memorable day! All able to wal the old burnt hotel. Right here gallant J. E. B. Stuart galloped by with the Twelfth Virginia cav rejoicing yells for some distance, until General Stuart halted us. I picked up a splendid Sharp's er, with their fine horses and equipment. General Stuart highly complimented the conduct of the regmodestly and patriotically yielded to General J. E. B. Stuart, who had been sent for by General Pen[2 more...]